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November - December 2009 Volume 2, Issue 6

Michigan Wing, Civil Air Patrol, U.S. Air Force Auxiliary


Inside this issue:

Major Betty Dumont Accepts Command of the Cadillac Civil Air Patrol Squadron

West MI Sq gets Glider Orientation

Alaska Units trains with Air Force In Remembrance Veterans Day Remembrance Calendar

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Michigan Wing Civil Air Patrol U.S. Air Force Auxiliary

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Special Articles of Interest

Character Development Moment The Builder on page 9 Swivel Chair Patrol on page 10 Pvt Murphy on page on page 11

Photo: By Major Vince Robinson: labeled Dumont COC (lt to rt) Michigan Wing Commander Mike Saile, Lt Col Raymond Hill, Major Betty Dumont and Lt Col Bill Dumont

William L. Dumont, Lt. Col, CAP Commander of the Northern Michigan Group
26 Sep 2009 At a Change of Command Ceremony held at the office of the Oakland County Sheriff, Major Betty Dumont was sworn in as commander of the Cadillac High Point Squadron. Presiding at the ceremony was Lt Col Bill Dumont, Commander of the Northern Michigan Group and Michigan Wing Commander Michael Saile, along with members of the Michigan Wing of the Civil Air Patrol. Continued on page 2
Wing Newsletter Staff

Capt Mike Sandstrom Executive Publisher 1st Lt Dave DArcy Senior Editor

Editor: Lt David J. DArcy ddarcy@miwg.cap.gov

Submissions: newsletter@miwg.cap.gov

IN-FORMATION
Major Betty Dumont Accepts Command of the Cadillac Civil Air Patrol Squadron
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Major Dumont is a long time member of the Civil Air Patrol initially joining the Monroe Squadron. She served as squadron medical officer and branched into Aerospace Education. After moving to Cadillac in 2003 she accepted the position of Director of Aerospace Education for the Michigan Wing and directed the statewide program for several years earning many award and recognition for the state for her efforts. Before the change of command she was the Deputy Commander for Senior Members as well as the Squadron Professional Development Officer. She also serves the Northern Michigan Group as the Professional Development Officer encompassing the northern lower peninsula. When not involved with Civil Air Patrol responsibilities, she is a Registered Nurse, employed at Mercy Home Care in Cadillac. She resides in Cadillac with her husband and two children, all members of t he Civil Air Patrol.

For hobbies she enjoys time in her green house, cooking, anything aviation and knitting. Although not a pilot for the Civil Air Patrol, she is a private pilot with considerable experience earned when living downstate. As a former hospice nurse when living in Monroe she is now enjoys volunteering for Mercy Hospice in Cadillac. Out going Commander Lt. Col Ray Hill will be changing jobs. He has accepted the position of Inspector General for the Northern Michigan Group and Communications Officer. In addition he will continue to serve the Cadillac unit as an Emergency Services Officer and Communications Officer.

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IN-FORMATION
West Michigan Squadron Takes to the Skies over Marshall, Michigan
Around lunchtime, the clouds cleared, the rain was driven away, and the skies parted as though to invite our members skyward. Although several other squadrons were invited, only three cadets from Grand Haven, Michigan came and reaped the bene-

C/Amn Bret Tiles exclaimed "Awesome!" when asked how he liked the ride

fit. One cadet had already received an orientation flight last July at his summer encampment, so he flew once, and the other two cadets were able to get up twice.

View more pictures from this story on pg 4


1st Lt David J. D'Arcy, CAP Mich Wg E-Newsletter Editor Lakeshore 119 Comp. Sq. Grand Haven, Michigan GRAND HAVEN, MICHIGAN

The cadets were required to take an on-line test on how to be a "Wing Runner" for a glider and they were able to put the newly acquired skill to work, under the watchful eye of the glider pilots who gave further instruction on how to properly hold the wing and run with it. Cadets were also taught to be careful on an active runway due to the dangers of the tow rope being dropped for the next flight, etc. The cadets were grateful for the chance and C/Amn Tiles said "It was Awesome" when asked how his day went. Cadets join CAP for various reasons, but obviously for our cadets the chance to fly trumps them all.

- Saturday, 10 October 2009, Pilots from the 235th Kellogg Field Senior Squadron, based at the Air National Guard Base, Battle Creek, gave the Lakeshore 119 Composite Squadron much - needed Orientation Flights in a glider. Three pilots volunteered an entire day to give cadets a chance to learn about flying in gliders. The lead tow plane was piloted by Major Rick Crepas, and the two glider pilots, Captain Ron Van Houten and 2nd Lt John McCormic gave expert and attentive instruction to the cadets who braved the cold and rain in hopes that it would clear up enough to fly!

IN-FORMATION

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More pictures from the O-Flight story from page 3

(L-R) Captain Ron Van Houten at the controls with C/CMSgt Aaron Trute receiving his first glider orientation ride

(Left) Major Rick Crepas, was the tow pilot for all the glider flights for the day

(Above) C/CMSgt Trute moments after letting go of the wing as instructed by the on-line Wing Runner Course One of Michigan Wing's Gliders coming in for a landing

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IN-FORMATION

Alaska aircrews play vital role in Air Force training exercises


November 4, 2009
Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron Public Affairs Officer 71st Composite Squadron Alaska Wing The opportunity to fight dissimilar F-15 versus F16 is highly valued but infrequent for most pilots. Even when they fight dissimilar, however, they're both doing 350-plus knots and operating in the same environment. Fighter pilots virtually never get to train in a combat-like setting against aircraft simulating low and slow targets ... until now, Rytting said. During Red Flag-Alaska large force employment exercises, CAP aircraft assisted Red Force Aggressors by providing just such targets. These low and slow aircraft provide unique threedimensional problems for high-tech fighters that spend most of their time between 20,000 and 40,000 feet, Rytting said. Our potential adversaries have certain aircraft -Antonov AN-2 Colts, for example -- that fly just above the trees at about 100 knots, he said. These propeller-driven aircraft are used for various missions, including behind-the-lines parachute

ALASKA -- The Alaska Wing provided the U.S. Air Force with valuable assistance in training domestic and allied pilots during the 2009 Red Flag Alaska season, contributing aircraft, pilots and crews to the effort. Red Flag-Alaska is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. joint and coalition forces. The exercise provides joint offensive counter-air, interdiction, close air support and large force employment training in a simulated combat environment. U.S. and allied pilots, aircrews and operational support personnel train and improve their air combat skills in preparation for a myriad of worldwide contingencies. The exercises are held on the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex -- the largest training range in America, totaling more than 65,000 square miles. Air operations are flown out of Eielson and Elmendorf air force bases. The 2009 exercises CAP participation in the 2009 exercises -- which spanned three two-week blocks, taking place April 16- May 1, July 23- Aug. 7 and Oct. 1-16 -- provided an added dimension to the exercises. In daily training at home station, fighter aircraft generally practice against their own kind, F-15 versus F-15, said Air Force Lt. Col. Matt Rytting, chief of advanced programs for the 353rd Combat Training Squadron as well as commander of the Alaska Wings Eielson 71st Composite Squadron.

insertion of special operations forces. CAP aircraft from all over Alaska participated in the exercises. For this latest exercise, we used four corporate aircraft -- a DHC-2, C-185, C-182 and a C -172 -- to simulate the high-wing AN-2 Colt, and one low-winged multi-engine privately owned CAP member aircraft to ensure a significant difference of aircraft design, said Maj. Steve Brewer, operations officer for the Eielson 71st. The twin-engine aircraft was added to the scenario for two of the four training days as a neutral-country, non-hostile Continued on pg 7

IN-FORMATION
In Remembrance
Subject: Col Dave Belcher It is with deep regret that I inform you that Col Dave Belcher, immediate past Massachusetts Wing Commander, passed away on Tuesday. There will be a visitation on Friday October 30th, from 4 to 8 pm, at Blanchard Funeral Chapel, 666 Plymouth Street, Whitman, MA 02382, followed by a private family service on Saturday. Donations may be made in his name to Hospice of the South Shore, Box 9060, Braintree, MA 02184; the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 10 Brookline Place / Floor 6, Brookline, MA 02445-9924; or the Massachusetts Wing CAP, Attn: Cadet Programs, Box 656, Bedford, MA 01730-0656. If you need additional information you may view his obituary at http://blanchardfc.com/ Obituaries.html. Colonel Belcher was an valued member of CAP for almost 30 years, just completed a successful four-year term as Wing Commander and will be greatly missed. Subject: Col Louisa S. Morse It is with deep regret that I inform you that one of the great ladies of Civil Air Patrol passed away yesterday. Colonel Louisa S. Morse was the Delaware Wing Commander from 1953 to 1976, Middle East Region Commander from 1976 to 1979 and then National Controller from 1979 to 1983. She was inducted into the CAP Hall of Honor in 1982. A memorial service will be held on, Tuesday, 27 October, at 2:00 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1502 W 13th St, Wilmington, DE 19806. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting donations to the Delaware Wing. In the event you never had the opportunity to meet this remarkable lady, I've attached some background information. She was a tremendous support of Civil Air Patrol for many years and will surely be missed.

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Col Louisa S. Morse (Recent and during WWII)

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Continued from page 5
aircraft that couldnt be shot down, furthering the requirement for crews to visually identify each aircraft before firing. The 71st Composite became uniquely positioned to provide low and slow support to the Air Force when it gained a new commander and operations officer in Rytting and Brewer, whose day jobs in the 353rd Combat Training Squadron directly support planning and execution of Red Flag -Alaska and oth er exerc ises. "With ELT and other CAP searches declining rapidly in Alaska, mission development became very important, Rytting said. I wanted members to feel a strong sense of purpose and saw an obvious opportunity to use CAP assets and crews to support the Air Force. Having several active-duty Air Force pilots and Department of Defense civilians in our squadron working at Red Flag gave us needed experience, knowledge and contacts to make these missions happen, he said. As a training resource, CAPs value to the Air Force is absolutely phenomenal, Rytting added. Last Thursday, the entire exercise except CAP and eight F-16s was cancelled for a massive cloud deck. They sent dozens of planes home from the airspace. The F-16s intercepted us at low altitude and received the only training of the day. Had we not been there, it would have been a wash. For CAP pilot and crew participating in Red Flag Alaska, no day is average. The day prior to the mission, Brewer said, the designated lead pilot for the CAP aircraft will spend four to six hours planning and coordinating the CAP aircraft route of flight with Air Force exercise planners. Then, the day of the exercise mission the crews attend a mass briefing with all the exercise participants four hours prior to takeoff, he continued. Then they attend a smaller briefing with the Red Air mission commander, and finally a brief with just the CAP crews to ensure all safety measures are in place, and all crewmembers questions are answered.

IN-FORMATION
Alaska aircrews play vital role in Air Force training exercises

The CAP crews benefit from their participation just as the Air Force pilots do. Red Flag provides a special opportunity for squadron pilots, scanners and observers to watch the military at work in a simulated combat environment, sometimes up-close and personal, Rytting said. Crews attend mission briefs and debriefs and see how their involvement adds to the scenario. Sister services and coalition forces are often also involved. While CAP flies at a relatively low 1,000 feet above ground level, some fighter aircraft such as the French Mirages that recently participated flew much lower, he said. For many CAP crews the demands and limitations of military flying provide a new experience. Flying Red Flag missions has expanded the knowledge base of CAP pilots into the realm of military exercises and military fighter training requirements, Brewer said. Our CAP crews have improved their visual scanning skills, and pilots are more effective and accurate at executing low-level flights and meeting timing requirements of plus- or minus-30-second windows for arrivin g at required waypo in t s. The hard work and attention to detail has paid off for the CAP crews. On Tuesday, two of our three aircraft made it to the target, Rytting said. We're 4-for-6, by the way. This proves the difficulty of targeting these unique threats in a large force employment exercise. The Air Force pays for CAP to furnish training aids. The cost is just over $1,000 per day to have four aircraft participate in the visual identification exercise, Brewer said.

Story finishes on Page 10 (Lower Left Corner)

IN-FORMATION
In Remembrance of Veterans Day November 11 The Eleventh Hour...
News of the Great Wars end officially broke in Washington at 2:30 a.m. Nov. 11, 1918. Still half-asleep, journalists heard a brief announcement at the State Department: The Armistice has been signed. It was signed at 5:00 a.m. Paris time and hostilities will cease at 11 oclock this morning Paris time. Why 11 oclock? Did a chief diplomat crave to complete the eerie triad of 11th day and the 11th hour as the moment when a four-year bloodbath would end? On the morning of Nov. 11, meeting in a railroad car at Compiegne, France, Allied and German representatives took eight minutes to sign the armistice. Marshal Ferdinand Foch, the Allies supreme commander, suggested an official signing time of 5 a.m. and a cease-fire six hours later. Hed been up all night and wanted to end the meeting quickly. After a German delegate read a final protest against the treatys harsh terms, the French general replied Tres bien, and left soon after. If Foch attached some mystical meaning to ending the war at the 11th hour, he never said so. It seems that he simply felt six hours would be enough time to get word of the cease-fire to troops on the front lines. News of the armistice took more time to reach soldiers fighting on what was then known as the Dark Continent. German troops in Africa fought long past the 11th hour, surrendering Nov. 23. Armistice Day was celebrated on Nov. 11 each year until 1954, when Congress changed the observance to Veterans Day.

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IN-FORMATION
Character Development Moment

THE BUILDER I saw a group of men in my hometown. I saw a group of men tearing a building down. With a heave and a ho and a mighty yell, They swung a beam and the sidewalk fell. And I said to the foreman, Are these men skilled, The type youd hire if you wanted to build? And he laughed and said, Why, no indeed. Common labors all I need. For I can tear down in a day or two What it took a builder ten years to do. And I thought to myself as I walked away, Which of these roles am I going to play? Am I the type that constantly tears down As I make my way, foolishly, around? Or am I the type thats trying to build with care, In hopes that my organizationll be glad I was there?

IN-FORMATION

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Civil Air Patrols Anniversary 1 December 1941

Alaska aircrews play vital role in Air Force training exercises


Continued from page 7

In addition, the CAP pilots and crews walk away from the exercise with a strong sense of accomplishment. "Ive really enjoyed being a CAP Aggressor pilot," said Capt. Brad Sipperley, deputy commander of the Ninth Composite Operations Squadron. A certified flight instructor, Sipperley is a retired Air Force chief of weather station operations now employed with the National Weather Service. "Im sitting in the briefings as a pilot and watching the weather briefers do what I did for so long and training with and against such a diverse number of pilots and crew from different nations and services," he said.

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IN-FORMATION

Calendar of Events for


WING STAFF MEETINGS EVERY THURSDAY @ 19:00 AND 2ND SATURDAY @ 10:00

November 7-8 - Training Leaders of Cadets, Kalamazoo 11 - Veterans Day (formerly Armistice Day) 14 15 - Aircrew/GT Rapid Response, Kellogg Field - Battle Creek 26 - Thanksgiving December 1 - CAPs Anniversary 1 - Present Charter to MI-002 7 - Pearl Harbor RememLeaders instill in their people a hope for success and a belief Leaders instill in their people a hope for success and a belief brance 6 - Rochester Hills Santa Parade 12 - Hanukkah Begins 19 - Academic Bowl, MvM interviews and NLD interviews 24 - Christmas Eve
New Columns Wanted: Michigan Unit in the Spotlight! Send us your units group photo and your story, well post it right here for others to be encouraged by! Any questions, write the editor! ddarcy@miwg.cap.gov Leaders instill in their people a hope for success and a belief in themselves. Positive leaders empower people to accomplish their goals.

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From the Editor

Thank you for your support and your stories! Getting the newsletter out by the 1st can be a daunting task. Your help is crucial. We have decided on a new bimonthly format, rather than monthly. Well produce a monthly newsletter once the Public Affairs Officers of the various units across the state start sending us stories so the rest of us can learn what other folks are doing across our fair state! I want to share with you a few reminders for those who have a story to share: Submissions need to be submitted no later than the 15th of the month (unless you read that I need more stories, please consider this the end date for the next months edition).

The stories need to be Civil Air Patrol focused and all pictures must present CAP members wearing their uniforms correctly, as well as all CAP members identified. Cadets, established Public Affairs Officers, or just someone who has a story to tell can submit stories; we welcome them all. All submissions to the newsletter must be sent to the newsletter email at:
newsletter@miwg.cap.gov

Finally, the ideal submission will be formatted by:

Story embedded in e-mail as well as list picture titles with proper identification, which would include CAP members name and grade and home unit, and location of the picture. Reporter and photographer are clearly identified with Name, Grade, Squadron and position. I want to give credit where credit is due!

Thanks! Lt Dave D'Arcy, Newsletter Editor

Call me if you have any questions:


786(616) 786-4220

Lt Dave DArcy, Wing Newsletter Publisher and member of Lakeshore 119 Comp Sq, Grand Haven, Michigan

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Need to speak with the editor? Call Lt DArcy at 616-786-4220 or email him directly at ddarcy@miwg.cap.gov Submit all stories for consideration for the Wings E-Newsletter, please send pictures (as attachments) and/or stories to newsletter@miwg.cap.gov

IN-FORMATION

Safety Newsletter - The Sentinel: http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/safety Michigan Wing, Civil Air Patrol: http://miwg.cap.gov National Civil Air Patrol: http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com

CIVIL AIR PATROL, OFFICIAL AUXILARY OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 56,000 members nationwide. CAP performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and was credited by the AFRCC with saving 90 lives in fiscal year 2008. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and counter-drug missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to the nearly 22,000 young people currently participating in CAP cadet programs. CAP has been performing missions for America for more than 67 years.