Anda di halaman 1dari 13

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEAT PROCESSING

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


Editorial Advisory Board
Gustavo V. Barbosa-Cnovas Washington State UniversityPullman P. Michael Davidson University of TennesseeKnoxville Mark Dreher McNeil Nutritionals, New Brunswick, NJ Richard W. Hartel University of WisconsinMadison Lekh R. Juneja Taiyo Kagaku Company, Japan Marcus Karel Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ronald G. Labbe University of MassachusettsAmherst Daryl B. Lund University of WisconsinMadison David B. Min The Ohio State University Leo M. L. Nollet Hogeschool Gent, Belgium Seppo Salminen University of Turku, Finland John H. Thorngate III Allied Domecq Technical Services, Napa, CA Pieter Walstra Wageningen University, The Netherlands John R. Whitaker University of CaliforniaDavis Rickey Y. Yada University of Guelph, Canada

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEAT PROCESSING


Edited by

Leo M. L. Nollet Fidel Toldr

Boca Raton London New York

A CRC title, part of the Taylor & Francis imprint, a member of the Taylor & Francis Group, the academic division of T&F Informa plc.

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Published in 2006 by CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group 6000 Broken Sound Parkway NW, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33487-2742 2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC CRC Press is an imprint of Taylor & Francis Group No claim to original U.S. Government works Printed in the United States of America on acid-free paper 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 International Standard Book Number-10: 1-57444-587-1 (Hardcover) International Standard Book Number-13: 978-1-57444-587-9 (Hardcover) Library of Congress Card Number 2005024763 This book contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources. Reprinted material is quoted with permission, and sources are indicated. A wide variety of references are listed. Reasonable efforts have been made to publish reliable data and information, but the author and the publisher cannot assume responsibility for the validity of all materials or for the consequences of their use. No part of this book may be reprinted, reproduced, transmitted, or utilized in any form by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including photocopying, microfilming, and recording, or in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publishers. For permission to photocopy or use material electronically from this work, please access www.copyright.com (http://www.copyright.com/) or contact the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC) 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, 978-750-8400. CCC is a not-for-profit organization that provides licenses and registration for a variety of users. For organizations that have been granted a photocopy license by the CCC, a separate system of payment has been arranged. Trademark Notice: Product or corporate names may be trademarks or registered trademarks, and are used only for identification and explanation without intent to infringe.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data


Advanced technologies for meat processing / edited by Leo M. L. Nollet and Fidel Toldr. p. cm. -- (Food science and technology ; 158) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-13: 978-1-57444-587-9 (alk. paper) ISBN-10: 1-57444-587-1 (alk. paper) 1. Meat. 2. Meat industry and trade. I. Nollet, Leo M. L., 1948- II. Toldr, Fidel. III. Food science and technology (Taylor & Francis) ; 158 TS1960.A38 2006 664'.9--dc22 2005024763

Visit the Taylor & Francis Web site at http://www.taylorandfrancis.com


Taylor & Francis Group is the Academic Division of Informa plc.

and the CRC Press Web site at http://www.crcpress.com

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Preface
Meat and meat products constitute some of the most important foods in Western societies. However, the area of meat science and technology is not as fully covered as other foods from the point of view of books dealing with such important aspects as quality, analysis, and processing technology. It must be pointed out that the meat industry has incorporated important technological developments in recent years. The main goal of this book is to provide the reader with recent developments in new technologies for the full meat processing chain. It starts with the production systems through the use of modern biotechnology (chapters 1 and 2); followed by automation in slaughterhouses (chapter 3); rapid nondestructive online detection systems (chapters 4, 5, and 6); the description of new technologies such as decontamination, high-pressure processing, fat reduction, functional meat compounds such as peptides or antioxidants, processing of nitrite-free products, and dry-cured meat products (chapters 714). Bacteriocins against meat-borne pathogens and the latest developments in bacterial starters for improved avor in fermented meats are discussed in chapters 15 and 16. The two remaining chapters (17 and 18) detail recent nal product packaging systems. This book is written by distinguished international contributors with extensive experience and solid reputations. It brings together all the advances in such varied and different technologies as biotechnology, irradiation, high pressure, and active packaging to be applied in different stages of meat processing. For all their efforts and for sharing their knowledge on these different topics we would like to thank very cordially all contributors of this volume.

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Editors
Leo M. L. Nollet is professor of biotechnology at Hogeschool Gent, Ghent, Belgium. The author and coauthor of numerous articles, abstracts, and presentations, Dr. Nollet is also the editor of the three-volume Handbook of Food Analysis (Second Edition), Handbook of Water Analysis, Food Analysis by HPLC (Second Edition) and Chromatographic Analysis of the Environment (Third Edition). His research interests include air and water pollution, liquid chromatography, and applications of different chromatographic techniques in food, water, and environmental parameters analysis. He earned a masters degree (1973) and a Ph.D. (1978) in biology from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. Fidel Toldr earned a bachelors degree in chemistry in 1980, a high degree in food technology in 1981, and a Ph.D. in chemistry in 1984. He is research professor and head of the Laboratory of Meat Science at the Instituto de Agroqumica y Tecnologa de Alimentos (CSIC), Valencia, Spain. He is also associate professor of food technology at the Polytechnical University of Valencia. Professor Toldr has received several awards such as the 2002 International Prize for Meat Science and Technology. He has authored and coauthored many book chapters, research articles, and patents. He has authored one book and coedited nine others. Professor Toldr is the editor of the journal Trends in Food Science and Technology, editor-in-chief of the new journal Current Nutrition & Food Science, and a member of the editorial boards of Meat Science, Food Chemistry, and Journal of Muscle Foods. His research interests are based on food chemistry and biochemistry, with a special focus on muscle foods. He serves on the Executive Committee of the European Federation of Food Science and Technology and the Scientic Commission on Food Additives of the European Food Safety Authority.

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Contributors
D. U. Ahn Animal Science Department Iowa State University Ames, Iowa Keizo Arihara Department of Animal Science Kitasato University Towada-shi, Japan Teresa Aymerich Meat Technology Center Institute for Food Research and Technology Monells, Spain Jos Manuel Barat Food Science and Technology Department Polytechnical University of Valencia Valencia, Spain Brian C. Bowker Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Amparo Chiralt Food Science and Technology Department Polytechnical University of Valencia Valencia, Spain Vronique Coma Centre de Recherche en Chimie Molculaire Universit Bordeaux Bordeaux, France Eric Dufour Dpartement Qualit & Economie Alimentaires ENITA Clermont Ferrand Lempdes, France
2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Janet S. Eastridge Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Pedro Fito Food Science and Technology Department Polytechnical University of Valencia Valencia, Spain Margarita Garriga Meat Technology Center Institute for Food Research and Technology Monells, Spain Raul Grau Food Science and Technology Department Polytechnical University of Valencia Valencia, Spain Kjell Ivar Hildrum Norwegian Food Research Institute Matforsk, Norway Terry A. Houser Department of Animal Science University of Florida Gainesville, Florida Yoshihide Ikeuchi Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology Kyushu University Fukuoka, Japan Francisco Jimnez-Colmenero Instituto del Fro (CSIC) Ciudad Universitaria Madrid, Spain Anna Jofr Meat Technology Center Institute for Food Research and Technology Monells, Spain

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Ken Kim Department of Applied Biological Chemistry Niigata University Niigata, Japan E. J. Lee Animal Science Department Iowa State University Ames, Iowa Mark Loeffen Mark Loeffen & Associates Ltd. Hamilton, New Zealand Sabine Leroy SRV-UR Microbiologie INRA Theix Champanelle, France Martha N. Liu Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Beln Martn Meat Technology Center Institute for Food Research and Technology Monells, Spain Aubrey Mendonca Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition Iowa State University Ames, Iowa Joseph M. Monfort Meat Technology Center Institute for Food Research and Technology Monells, Spain Tadayuki Nishiumi Department of Applied Biological Chemistry Niigata University Niigata, Japan

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Ernest W. Paroczay Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Jitu R. Patel Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Ronald B. Pegg Department of Applied Microbiology and Food Science University of Saskatchewan Saskatoon, SK, Canada Graham Purnell Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre University of Bristol Somerset, UK Peter Rdstrm Applied Microbiology, Lund Institute of Technology Lund University Lund, Sweden Milagro Reig Department of Food Science Instituto de Agroqumica y Tecnologa de Alimentos (CSIC) Valencia, Spain Jean-Pierre Renou STIM INRA Theix Champanelle, France Joseph G. Sebranek Animal Science, Food Science and Human Nutrition Iowa State University Ames, Iowa Vegard H. Segtnan Norwegian Food Research Institute Matforsk, Norway

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Fereidoon Shahidi Department of Biochemistry Memorial University of Newfoundland St. Johns, NL, Canada Manan Sharma Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Morse B. Solomon Food Technology and Safety Laboratory USDA-ARS Beltsville, Maryland Atsushi Suzuki Department of Applied Biological Chemistry Niigata University Niigata, Japan Rgine Talon SRV-UR Microbiologie INRA Theix Champanelle, France Hiroyuki Tanji Department of Applied Biological Chemistry Niigata University Niigata, Japan Declan J. Troy The National Food Centre Dublin, Republic of Ireland John L. Williams Division of Genetics and Genomics Roslin Institute Edinburgh, Scotland Jens Petter Wold Norwegian Food Research Institute Matforsk, Norway Petra Wolffs Applied Microbiology, Lund Institute of Technology Lund University Lund, Sweden
2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Contents
Chapter 1 Bioengineering of Farm Animals: Meat Quality and Safety.................................... 1 Morse B. Solomon, Janet S. Eastridge, and Ernest W. Paroczay Chapter 2 Gene Technology for Meat Quality ........................................................................ 21 John L. Williams Chapter 3 Automation for the Modern Slaughterhouse .......................................................... 43 Graham Purnell and Mark Loeffen Chapter 4 Hot-Boning of Meat: A New Perspective ............................................................... 73 Declan J. Troy Chapter 5 New Spectroscopic Techniques for Online Monitoring of Meat Quality .............. 87 Kjell Ivar Hildrum, Jens Petter Wold, Vegard H. Segtnan, Jean-Pierre Renou, and Eric Dufour Chapter 6 Real-Time PCR for the Detection of Pathogens in Meat..................................... 131 Petra Wolffs and Peter Rdstrm Chapter 7 Meat Decontamination by Irradiation ................................................................... 155 D. U. Ahn, E. J. Lee, and A. Mendonca Chapter 8 Application of High Hydrostatic Pressure to Meat and Meat Processing ........... 193 Atsushi Suzuki, Ken Kim, Hiroyuki Tanji, Tadayuki Nishiumi, and Yoshihide Ikeuchi Chapter 9 Hydrodynamic Pressure Processing to Improve Meat Quality and Safety.......... 219 Morse B. Solomon, Martha N. Liu, Jitu R. Patel, Brian C. Bowker, and Manan Sharma
2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Chapter 10 Functional Properties of Bioactive Peptides Derived From Meat Proteins ......... 245 Keizo Arihara Chapter 11 New Approaches for the Development of Functional Meat Products.................. 275 Francisco Jimnez-Colmenero, Milagro Reig, and Fidel Toldr Chapter 12 Processing of Nitrite-Free Cured Meats ............................................................... 309 Ronald B. Pegg and Fereidoon Shahidi Chapter 13 Biochemical Proteolysis Basis for Improved Processing of Dry-Cured Meats............................................................................................... 329 Fidel Toldr Chapter 14 Vacuum Salting Treatment for the Accelerated Processing of Dry-Cured Ham................................................................................................. 353 Jos M. Barat, Raul Grau, Pedro Fito, and Amparo Chiralt Chapter 15 The Use of Bacteriocins Against Meat-Borne Pathogens .................................... 371 Teresa Aymerich, Margarita Garriga, Anna Jofr, Beln Martn, and Joseph M. Monfort Chapter 16 Latest Developments in Meat Bacterial Starters................................................... 401 Rgine Talon and Sabine Leroy Chapter 17 Modied Atmosphere Packaging .......................................................................... 419 Joseph G. Sebranek and Terry A. Houser Chapter 18 Perspectives for the Active Packaging of Meat Products ..................................... 449 Vronique Coma

2006 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC