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The Johari Window

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PURPOSE

Assist you, as change leaders to gain an understanding for and appreciation of how effective feedback and selfdisclosure can improve communication skills.

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The Johari Window is a communication model that can be used to improve understanding between individuals. Developed by Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham (the word Johari comes from Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham).

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Two key ideas behind the tool:


Individuals can build trust between themselves by disclosing information about themselves. They can learn about themselves and come to terms with personal issues with the help of feedback from others.

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Using the Johari model, each person is represented by their own four-quadrant, or four-pane, window. Each of these contains and represents personal information - feelings, motivation - about the person, and shows whether the information is known or not known by themselves or other people.

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JOHARI WINDOW PANES


I know
aware

me

I do not know
unaware

group knows

aware

Arena

Blind spot Self Disclosure

you
unaware Facade Unknown

group does not know


Feedback
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The four quadrants are:

Quadrant 1: Open Area What is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others.

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This type of person has a clear self image and enough confidence. In a management role he tends to feel respected and encouraged to grow.

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For example, a persons height, eye color and occupation all fall under the open area. The more you know about yourself and the more you reveal to others, the larger your open arena. Communication is open, with minimal defensiveness.

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Quadrant 2: Blind Area, or "Blind Spot" What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which others know. This can be simple information, or can involve deep issues (for example, feelings of inadequacy, incompetence, unworthiness, rejection) which are difficult for individuals to face directly, and yet can be seen by others.

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This type of person talks a lot but does not listen too well. He is preoccupied with himself and does not know when to keep quite. In a management role employees tents to feel annoyed with that person.

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Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided Area What the person knows about him/herself that others do not.

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The faade or hidden area relates to things I know about myself, but other people dont know, which means I wish to keep them hidden; It has to do with our personal, private self, and includes our opinions, attitudes and biases. How much we keep hidden depends on how close we are to another person; we usually reveal more about ourselves to people we trust. Included in the faade window may be such things as previous bad school or work , bad experiences, unwanted personality traits, and negative reactions towards another person.

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This type of person is always asking about information from others but gives very little in return. In a management role employees tends to feel defensive and resentful.

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Quadrant 4: Unknown Area What is unknown by the person about him/herself and is also unknown by others.

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The final window is called unknown because it relates to things neither I nor the other person know about me - things which are usually hidden in the unconscious. We know the unconscious exists because we occasionally act out certain behaviors and have trouble tracing back the reasons for them. Change in the blind and hidden areas is possible through revelation and feedback .

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This type of person lacks self knowledge and understanding. His behaviour tends to be unpredictable and security oriented. In a management role employees tends to feel confused and insecure about expectations.

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BEHAVIORS/ACTIONS THAT CAUSE PANES TO MOVE/CHANGE SIZE


Knowing what the panes represent will help you understand and describe behavior/action that causes the panes of the Johari Window to move/change size.
Arena - Giving and soliciting feedback; self-disclosure. Blind spot - Soliciting and being receptive to feedback. Facade - Giving feedback and self-disclosure. Unknown - Availing yourself of and being receptive to sharing experiences of others; learning vicariously.
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REASONS FOR GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK


Allows personal growth.

Enables the provider to learn about self.


Enables the receiver to gain insight. Creates an open environment for effective operational and interpersonal communications. Aids in preparation for the future; not dwelling on the past.

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JOHARI WINDOW activity 1 (home assignment )


RATING SCALE AND INSTRUCTIONS Below is the basic ten-point scale to be used in rating yourself on your use of the twenty behaviors describe on the next two pages. Read over the behavior description and determine how much it characterizes yourself in your relationship with other people. SCALE VALUE

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10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

EXTREMELY CHARACTERISTIC VERY CHARACTERISTIC QUITE CHARACTERISTIC PRETTY CHARACTERISTIC FAIRLY CHARACTERISTIC SOMEWHAT CHARACTERISTIC FAIRLY UNCHARACTERISTIC PRETTY UNCHARACTERISTIC QUITE UNCHARACTERISTIC EXTREMELY UNCHARACTERISTIC

I do this consistently I do this nearly all the time I do this most of the time I do this a good deal of the time I do this frequently I do this on occasion I seldom do this I hardly ever do this I almost never do this I never do this
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JOHARI WINDOW QUESTIONS CONT.

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1. I am open and candid in my dealings with others, as opposed to being closed, cautious, and under wraps in my relationships. 2. I hear, respect, and accept the comments and reactions of others, as opposed to responding defensively, dismissing them as of little value, or turning a deaf ear on their observations. 3. I specifically test for agreement and commitment to joint or team decisions, as opposed to assuming that all are committed if no one openly disagrees. 4. I readily admit to confusion or lack of knowledge when I feel that I have little information about the topic under discussion as opposed to trying to bluff, feigning understanding, or insisting that my opinions are right. 5. I show my concern that others know where I stand on relevant issues, as opposed to being basically indifferent to others knowledge of me or just unrevealing in my comments. 6. I take the initiative in getting feedback from other members, as opposed to others to offer their comments of their own accord. waiting passively for

7. I "level" with others and describe how I feel about what they do and how they do it, as opposed to covering up, taking tolerance or denying any reaction.
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JOHARI WINDOW QUESTIONS CONT.


8. My comments are relevant, and pertinent to the real issues at hand in the team, as opposed to being "frothy" and off-target or attempts at camouflage. 9. I try to understand how others are feelings and work hard at getting information from them, which will help me do this, as opposed to appearing indifferent, showing superficial concern or being basically insensitive. 10. I value and encourage reactions equally from others, as opposed to being selective in my quest for feedback or treating some contributions as inferior. 11. I am openly affectionate toward others when I feel I like them, as opposed to being inhibited, restrained, or acting embarrassed. 12. I help others participate and work to support and draw everyone into a group discussion, as opposed to fending only for myself and leaving participation up to each individual. 13. I take risks with others and expose highly personal information, both emotional and intellectual, when it is pertinent, as opposed to playing it safe, as if I don't trust others. 14. I welcome and appreciate other's attempts to help me, no matter how critical or direct their feedback, as oppose to acting hurt, sulking, indifferent, or rejecting them outright.

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JOHARI WINDOW QUESTIONS CONT.


15. I openly try to influence an individual or a group, as opposed to being manipulative.

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16. I press for additional information when I am angered by them, as opposed to acting unaffected, restrained, or over controlled. 17. I am openly hostile towards others when I am angered by them, as opposed to acting unaffected, restrained, or over controlled. 18. I encourage collaboration on problems and solicit others definitions and solutions on mutual problems, as opposed to insisting on mechanical decision rules or trying to railroad my own judgments through. 19. I am spontaneous and say what I think no matter how "far out" it may seem, as opposed to monitoring my contributions so that they are in line with prevailing through or more acceptable to others. 20. I give support to others who are on the spot and struggling to express themselves intelligently and emotionally, as opposed to letting them flounder or trying to move on without them.
ADD YOUR RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS: FEEDBACK TOTAL: ADD YOUR RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS: EXPOSURE TOTAL: 2, 3, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 2O.

1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 13, 15, 17, and l9. 26

FEEDBACK 10 20 30 40
E
X P O S U R E

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50 60 70 80 90

X P O S

U
R E

100

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100
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FEEDBACK

Activity 2 (Graphing and sharingself


within a relationship)

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Think of a very close relationship you have with another person. Write that persons name. Now draw a vertical line and mark X on that line to show how willing you are to disclose or share personal thoughts with that person.

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Now draw a horizontal line and mark X on how open you are to receiving feedback or information about yourself from that person. Now join both the X by dotted lines an you can view the Johari window of your relation with that person

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Key Points:
In most cases, the aim in groups should be to develop the Open Area for every person. Working in this area with others usually allows for enhanced individual and team effectiveness and productivity. The Open Area is the space where good communications and cooperation occur, free from confusion, conflict and misunderstanding. Self-disclosure is the process by which people expand the Open Area vertically. Feedback is the process by which people expand this area horizontally. By encouraging healthy self-disclosure and sensitive feedback, you can build a stronger and more effective team.