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CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR)

PRESENTED BY:
Ms. RENCY VARGHESE

INTRODUCTION

WHAT IS CPR?
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including heart attack or near drowning, in which someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

CPR TIME LINE:


0-4 mins. 4-6 mins. 6-10 mins . Over 10 mins. Brain damage unlikely. Brain damage possible. Brain damage probable. Probable brain death.

PHASES OF CPR
PHASE I BASIC LIFE SUPPORT

AIRWAY

BREATHING
CIRCULATION

PHASE II- ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT


DEFIBRILLATION

& DRUGS

ECG

FLUIDS

PHASE III- PROLONGED LIFE SUPPORT

GAUGING
HUMAN MENTATION INTENSIVE CARE

INDICATIONS FOR CPR

WHO ALL CAN GIVE CPR?

Skilled personnel Bystanders or persons near to victim Family members

GUIDELINES
In 2005, new CPR guidelines were published by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR)
A

universal compression-ventilation ratio (30:2) recommended for all single rescuers of infant (less than one year old), child (1 year old to puberty), and adult (puberty and above) victims (excluding newborns).

CPR FOR CHILD


If

the child is unresponsive and you are alone with him, start rescue efforts immediately and perform CPR for at least 1 to 2 minutes before dialing emergency Check the victim for responsiveness by gently shaking the child and shouting, "Are you okay?" DO NOT shake the child if you suspect he may have suffered a spinal injury.

Place two fingers at the sternum (the bottom of the rib cage where the lower ribs meet) and then put the heel of your other hand directly on top of your fingers The rule to remember is 1 hand, 1 inch. Count aloud as you compress 30 times, followed by 2 breaths. Perform 5 cycles of 30 compressions and 2 breaths before checking the child for breathing and pulse. victim's carotid artery for pulse as well as any signs of consciousness.

REMEMBER THE ABCS


A: AIRWAY

B:

BREATHING CIRCULATION

C:

BEFORE YOU BEGIN CHECK RESPONSE ARE YOU OK ???

CALL EMERGENCY 1062.

PLACE THE VICTIM IN PROPER

POSITION..

A: AIRWAY

OPEN AIRWAY

SIT NEXT TO VICTIMS NECK & SHOULDER, THEN HEAD TILT & CHIN LIFT

IF ANY SUSPECTED INJURY OF NECK THEN JAW


THRUST WITHOUT HEAD TILT

B: BREATHING
Look Listen Feel for breathing

PINCH THE NOSTRILS

TAKE A DEEP BREATH & COVER VICTIMS MOUTH WITH YOURS & GIVE 2 BREATHS

C: CIRCULATION
CHECK PULSE

WHEN THERE ARE 2 RESCUERS

REVIEW- CHECK THE VITALS

RESCUE BREATHING

CHEST COMPRESSIONS

CPR FOR INFANTS


Most

cardiac arrests in infants occur from lack of oxygen, such as from drowning or choking. If you know the infant has an airway obstruction, perform first aid for choking. If you don't know why the infant isn't breathing, perform CPR.

HEIMLICH MANEUVER

Although

the head tilt/chin lift technique is similar to adults and children, when clearing an infant's airway it's important not to tilt the head too far back. An infant's airway is extremely narrow and overextending the neck may actually close off the air passage

SNIFFERS POSITION

CPR FOR INFANT

CHECKING VITAL SIGNS

RESCUE BREATHING

CHEST COMPRESSIONS

CPR

WITH ADVANCED AIRWAY

WHEN TO STOP CPR


WHEN

PERSON SHOW SIGNS OF RECOVERY BECAME PHYSICALLY UNABLE TO CONTINUE

YOU

TRAINED

FIRST AIDER ARRIVES

COMPLICATIONS OF CPR
Vomiting

is the most frequently encountered complication of CPR. If the victim starts to vomit, turn the head to the side and try to sweep out or wipe off the vomit. Continue with CPR.