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FOODBORNE ILLNESS

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THE DANGER OF FOODBORNE ILLNESS

A foodborne illness is a disease carried or transmitted to people by food


A foodborne illness outbreak is an incident in which two or more people experience the same illness after eating the same food and confirmed when laboratory analysis shows that a specific food is the sources of illness.
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Factors that contribute to foodborne illness

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1. Improper Holding Temperature

Temperature abuse allowing food to remain in the temperature danger zone for unacceptable period of time.

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Avoid temperature abuse

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Measure Food Temperature

Dial-face metal stem

Infrared

Built-in

Digital

Thermocouple

T-Stick

Maximum registering
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Calibrate a Thermometer
Before their first use At regular interval If drop or otherwise damaged If use to measure extreme temperature Whenever accuracy is in question

Boiling Point or Ice Point Method


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Preventing Temperature Abuse

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11. Good Personal Hygiene


Following hygienic hand practice Maintaining personal cleanliness Wearing clean and appropriate uniform & following dress code Avoiding unsanitary habits and actions Maintaining good health
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Hygienic Hand Practice

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Wash hands after

Using the restroom Handling raw foods Touching hair or body Sneezing, coughing, using handkerchief Smoking, eating, drinking, chewing tobacco or gum

Using chemicals Handling garbage Clearing tables or busing dirty dishes Touching aprons or clothing Touching other unsanitized surfaces

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Foodhandlers should:
A

Wear a clean hat or other hair restraint


B

Wear clean clothing daily Remove aprons when leaving foodpreparation areas
C
D

Remove jewelry Wear clean, closed-toe shoes

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111. Cross Contamination

The transfer of germs from one food item to another.

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Direct cross-contamination involves the transfer of a harmful agent from raw foods to cooked or ready-to-eat foods
example of direct contact: blood from thawing ground beef dripping onto fresh produce stored on a shelf below

Indirect cross-contamination involves the transfer of a harmful agent to foods by hands, utensils, or equipment.

example of indirect contact: raw chicken prepared with a knife and cutting board and knife and cutting board are not cleaned and sanitized after use
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Methods for Preventing CrossContamination During Preparation

Prepare raw meat separately from cooked/ready-to-eat foods Assign specific equipment for each food Use specific containers for each food Clean and sanitize food-contact surfaces after each task

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Use disposable or colorcoded cleaning cloths Consider using gloves for food preparation and service Practice good personal hygiene

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Summary

Almost all foodborne illness are linked to:


improper holding temperature poor personal hygiene contaminated equipment inadequate cooking food from an unsafe source
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