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INTRODUCTION TO

SAFETY MANAGEMENT
Prepared by: Pau B. Plantas
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UNI VE RS I T Y OF T HE E AS T
COL L E GE OF E NGI NE E RI NG
COMP UT E R E NGI NE E R I NG DE PART ME NT
Ma n i l a Ca mp u s

NES120 SAFETY MANAGEMENT
Safety and Management
Safety
The state of being "safe.
The condition of being protected against physical, social, spiritual,
financial, political, emotional, occupational, psychological,
educational or other types or consequences of failure,
damage, error, accidents, harm or any other event which could be
considered non-desirable.
Management
In business and organizations, Management is the function that
coordinates the efforts of people to accomplish goals
and objectives using available resources efficiently and effectively.
Management comprises planning, organizing, staffing, leading or
directing, and controlling an organization or initiative to accomplish
a goal.
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Safety Management
An organisational function, which ensures that all safety risks
have been identified, assessed and satisfactorily mitigated.
Application of set of principles, framework, processes and
measures to prevent accidents, injuries and other adverse
consequences that may be caused by using a service or a
product.
It implies a systematic approach to managing safety, including
the necessary organisational structure, accountabilities,
policies and procedures.
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Types of Safety Management
Reactive Safety Management
Identification and correction of systems deficiencies by
professional analysis of safety occurrences.

Proactive Safety Management
Prediction of systems deficiencies before errors occur.
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Safety Engineering
An engineering discipline which assures that engineered
systems provide acceptable levels of safety. It is strongly
related to systems engineering, industrial engineering and
the subset system safety engineering.
Safety engineering assures that a life-critical system behaves
as needed, even when components fail.
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Workplace Safety
Commonly referred to as Occupational Health and Safety
(OHS) or Workplace Health and Safety (WHS).
An area concerned with protecting the safety, health and
welfare of people engaged in work or employment.
All organizations have a duty of care to ensure that employees
and any other person who may be affected by the companies
undertaking remain safe at all times.
Occupational safety and health can be important for moral,
legal, and financial reasons.
It deals with all aspects of health and safety in the workplace
and has a strong focus on primary prevention of hazards as
defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) a
specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) that is concerned
with international public health.
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Workplace Hazards
Source of potential damage, harm or adverse health effects
on something or someone under certain conditions at work.
These hazards include but are not limited to:
Physical Hazards
Mechanical Hazards
Biological Hazards
Chemical Hazards
Psychosocial Hazards


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Workplace Hazards
Physical Hazards
Common source of injuries in many industries.
An engineering workshop specialising in the fabrication
and welding of components has to follow the Personal
Protective Equipment (PPE) at work regulations 1992.



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Workplace Hazards
Mechanical Hazards
Machines can be dangerous to workers for it may involve
moving parts, sharp edges, hot surfaces and other
hazards with the potential to crush, burn, cut, shear,
stab or otherwise strike or wound workers if used unsafely.
Confined Spaces
Noise
Temperature
Electricity
Safety measures including lockout-tagout procedures for
machine maintenance and roll over protection systems for
vehicles exist to minimize these hazards.

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Workplace Hazards
Biological Hazards
Bacteria
Virus
Fungi
Blood-borne pathogens
Tuberculosis


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Workplace Hazards
Chemical Hazards
Acids
Bases
Heavy metals
Lead
Solvents
Petroleum
Particulates
Silica
Fumes (noxious gases/vapors)
Highly-reactive chemicals
Fire, conflagration and explosion hazards


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Workplace Hazards
Psychosocial Hazards
Hazards are related to the way work is designed,
organised and managed, as well as the economic and
social contexts of work and are associated with psychiatric,
psychological and/or physical injury or illness.
Occupational Stress
Workplace Violence
Precarious work contracts
Increased worker vulnerability due to globalization
New forms of employment contracts
Feeling of job insecurity
Aging workforce
Long working hours
Work intensification
Lean production and outsourcing
High emotional demands
Poor work-life balance

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