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Arizona Fiduciaries Association, Inc.

AFA Summer Workshop 2006


Prescott, Arizona
July 28, 2006

Succession Management
Planning and Knowledge
Management

Succession Management
Planning (SMP)
A dynamic ongoing business
process that brings together the
execution of a strategic business
plan with the identification,
assessment, development and
deployment of talent to ensure
successful continuity of the
organization

OR . . .

HAVING THE RIGHT PEOPLE IN


THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT
TIME, ALL THE TIME.

Knowledge Management is . . .
The systemic collection, analysis
and dissemination of information
and insight in an organization.

Tacit Knowledge:
The higher-level understanding
that enables institutions to go
beyond routine procedural
activities to anticipating and
solving problems

Hard to capture in policies and procedures.


Comes largely from experience and cannot
be quickly learned.
Hard to define, but you know when you
see it.

Explicit Knowledge:
Embedded in databases,
procedures, written processes,
statutes and other documents

Detail

Detail

Detail

Explicit Knowledge = Information


Tacit Knowledge = Wisdom

Much of which purports to be


knowledge management is in
reality information
management.

Information Management . . .

Is working with data, policies,


business processes, statutes, case
law, code of ethics, spreadsheets
and objects. It deals with explicit
representations.

Knowledge Management . . .

recognizes value in originality,


innovation, adaptability, intelligence
and learning.

Professional and social network important.


Concerned with critical thinking.
Encourages sharing of experiences,
failures, best practices, and competitive
advantage.

Role of Technology in
Knowledge Management
Is core focus in information
management.
Information management should be
centralized in organization.
Technology used to foster dialog (list
serves, websites) share context and
negotiate meaning.

Experts v. Novices
Novices rely on formal rules and
procedures to guide them.
Experts rely to greater degree on
accumulated experience.
Novices are highly conscious of task
performance process.

Experts v. Novices (Cont.)


Experts, because of experience, see
the whole picture and have a larger
number and more effective
strategies for performing the task.
Experts know how to solve problems
quickly because they have multiple
strategies for dealing with the
unexpected.

Experts v. Novices (Cont.)


Experts can make very complex,
difficult tasks look easy.
Experts rely on intuition.
Experts are more flexible than novices.

Experts v. Novices (Cont.)


Experts acquire the ability to do less
and less, better and better a
process called
ENCAPSULATION
Whereby energies and skills become
focused on specific areas.

Experts v. Novices (Cont.)

As expertise grows, performance


of the task becomes automatic.
This cognitive phenomenon is
called:

AUTOMATICITY

Knowledge Mapping:
The ongoing quest to discover the
location, ownership, value and use of
knowledge, and to learn the rules
and expertise of people, to identify
constraints to the flow of knowledge,
and to highlight opportunities to
leverage existing knowledge.

Why Should I Map the


Knowledge in my Organization?

To encourage re-use of important


knowledge, saving search and research
time.
Highlight areas of expertise and build
bridges to increase knowledge sharing.
To help staff find critical information quickly.
To improve client service, decision-making
and problem solving by providing access
information.

What do you Need to Map?


Documents, files, systems, policies,
business processes, relationships,
competencies.
Explicit and tacit knowledge, lessons
learned, social and professional
networks.

How do you Collect the


Information?
Conduct interviews and ask targeted
questions.
Business processes and workflow
diagrams.

Ask:
How can the knowledge flow be
improved, what is preventing you
doing more, better, faster?
Who do you go to when there is a
problem? Who knows whom is key.

Retaining Institutional
Memory and Knowledge
Some institutional knowledge should
not be retained.
Use of cross-training, job rotation, job
shadowing, mentoring, special
assignments.

Sharing the Knowledge

Contributing to the
success of others should
be a primary requirement
of all professionals.

Sharing of knowledge and


documenting business
processes should be part
of performance plans.

Sharing Knowledge
Remove the fears.
Provide incentives.
Set forums to share.

Business Processes
Identification of key processes.
Each process is either value added
or waste.
Looking for the waste in the process.

Recruitment and Interviewing


of Staff

Frame the questions to find the skills,


personality and knowledge.
Hiring for attitude.
People cant share knowledge if they
dont speak a common language.

Transfer of Organizational
Knowledge
Transfer = Transmission + Absorption
(and use).
Transfer of tacit knowledge requires
extensive personal communications.