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TECHNICAL REPORT:

Analytical Report
By: Roger C. Bayotas II

ANALYTICAL REPORT

Analytical report is an informational


report which gives primary state of affairs
information to the management or to the
employees and includes assessment,
evaluation, or feasibility study in its study
scheme.

ANALYTICAL REPORT: ILO Report


INCREASING JOB STRESS TAKES TOLL ON
WORKERS WORLD WIDE
By David Briscoe
The UNS International Labor Organization says job stress is
increasing to the point of a world-wide epidemic affecting some of the
most ordinary jobs.
Waitresses in Sweden, teachers in Japan, postal workers in
America,
bus drivers in Europe, and assembly line workers
everywhere are all showing increasing signs of job stress. Being
required keep up with machines, having no say about the job and
receiving low pay for long hours have left millions of workers burned
out, accident prone or sick.

ANALYTICAL REPORT: ILO Report


A major new stress-inducing employer practice is the constant
electronic monitoring of the rapidly growing numbers of workers who use
computers, it says.
The report, Job Stress The 20th Century Disease, points to growing
evidence of problems around the world, including developing countries,
where companies are doing little if anything to help employees cope with the
strain of modern industrialization.
The international organization, which monitors workers issues around
the world, estimates the cost of job stress at $200 billion in the United States
alone, from compensation claims, reduced productivity, for related disease
such as ulcers, high blood pressure and heart attack.

ANALYTICAL REPORT: ILO Report


US job-stress-claims have climbed from 5% of all occupational claims in 1980 to
15% a decade later In Australia, stress claims increased to 90% in three
years, accounting for 35% of all government workers compensation costs in
1990.
In Japan, there have been relatively few such claims, but work pressure in so
critical that the Japanese have a term for death by overwork: Karoshi. A recent
survey cited in the report says 40% of all Japanese workers fear they literally will
work themselves to death.
As the use of computers spreads throughout the world, workers in many
countries are being subjected to new pressures, including monitoring, the report
says.

ANALYTICAL REPORT: ILO Report


In airline offices, government agencies, insurance companies, mailorder houses, and telephone companies, they find themselves constantly
checked by employers who can monitor everything from the speed of their
typing to the length of breaks they are taking.
Among the evidence of the world-wide job stress are 1) a British study
showing that repetitive work was not necessarily stressful, but when the
worker is required to keep up with the machine, anxiety levels increase; 2)
Another British Study showing that police officers found organizational and
management pressures more stressful than dealing with crime scenes and
handling violent incidents; 3) Studies of teachers in Japan showing 40%
suffered from health problem that could be related to stress.

ANALYTICAL REPORT: ILO Report


In the United States, Mexico, Japan, Canada, India and Sweden
companies have taken steps to reduce stress on their employees. They
re-engineer the workplace to make it better suited to human aptitudes
and aspirations.

ANALYTICAL REPORT
SICK BUILDING SYNDROME BAFFLES RESEARCHERS
Massive infusions of fresh air appear to have no effect on sick building syndrome,
the mysterious array of allergy-like symptoms which affect millions of workers in
modern office buildings, new research has found.
There is no known cause for sick building syndrome, which the WHO has defined
as an excess of work-related skin and mucous membrane irritations, headache,
fatigue and difficulty in concentrating.
The syndrome is believed to affect millions of office workers in the United States,
reducing productivity and increasing absentee rates. Symptoms usually abate or
disappear after a person leaves the building.

ANALYTICAL REPORT
In about 25% of the cases, microbe contamination, accumulations of car
exhausts, or some other specific cause can be identified as the culprit,
but the vast majority of cases remain a mystery.
To test the hypothesis that a breath of fresh air might be all that is
needed, DR. Richard Menzies and his colleagues at McGill University in
Montreal looked at four buildings typical of offices in North America.
In tests of workers in four buildings, the researchers pumped in twice the
normal amount of outside air to no avail. Whether the amount of outdoor
air was 30 or 64 cubic feet per minute per person, about half the workers
involved still reported at least one symptom - about the same level as
before.

ANALYTICAL REPORT
Increases in the supply of outdoor air did not appear to affect
workers perception of their office environment or their reporting of
symptoms considered typical of the sick building syndrome, the
researchers concluded.
Tests showed that when the amount of fresh air increased, the
amount of carbon dioxide, levels of organic compounds and
formaldehyde levels dropped, but there was no change in the number
of complaints.