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Women and the Web

Unleashing a global opportunity

Agenda
1. Introduction
2. Summary Insights - Women & the Web
report 2012

Context and background


Intel Corporation engaged Dalberg Global Development
Advisors to conduct a study on the relationship between
gender and the Internet in developing countries, in
consultation with individuals at UN Women; the State Departments
Office of Global Womens Issues, Experience Insights Lab, IXR, Intel
Labs; and World Pulse
This study specifically explored the barriers and
opportunities related to online access, Internet usage, and
gender in order to quantify implications and identify
recommendations for the private sector, the social sector,
and the development community

Focused on the emerging middle class rather than BoP


+2,000 women surveyed across India, Egypt, Mexico and
Uganda
Over 40 interviews with global gender and ICT experts
Extensive literature review and global data analysis

The resulting report revealed an urgent and untapped opportunity


in reaching the underserved segment of women and girls in

Dalberg is a strategy and advisory firm dedicated to


Global Development
Founded in 2001
Grown to 14 global offices, with 4 in Africa
SAN
FRANCISCO

LOND
NEW YORK
ON
WASHINGTON
DC
DAKAR
LAG
OS

COPENHAGEN
GENEVA
ABU DHABI
NEW DELHI
MUMBAI
SINGAPORE
NAIROBI

Staff drawn from top-tier management


consulting firms in the private sector

Expertise in both business and

JOHANNESBUR
G

development strategy, and on-the-ground


implementation experience in frontier and
emerging markets

Services and sample of


Identification of investment opportunities &
clients
business case creation

Market feasibility, entry & growth strategies

World Bank

Organizational improvement
Performance management and evaluation
Policy advisory
Portfolio and project management
Strategic planning & program design
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Introduction: The Internet Gender Gap


The Internet is the global gateway to ideas, resources and
opportunities. . .
and yet not all people have equitable access to the Internet
On average across the developing world, nearly 25% fewer
women and girls are online than men and boys, and this gender
gap climbs to above 40% in regions like sub-Saharan Africa

To begin to bridge the Internet


gender gap,
the number of women and girls
online can and should be doubled
in the coming three years
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Internet penetration in the developing world is


growing rapidly

Internet Users in Developing


er ofCountries
Internet users

Drivers of Growth

2.5B

2.1B

Improved infrastructure e.g.,


3G
Proliferation of access
platforms including
broadening spectrum of entry
points e.g., smarphones

1.8B
1.4B

Increased affordability of
platforms and services
Increased public sector and
4/9/1
4/9/1
4/9/1
4/9/1
NGO support to facilitate
5
5
5
5
awareness, education and
access
e.g. WOUGNET in
Developing world Internet
penetration
Uganda
growth is outpacing the developed
world

by 4x

1. Estimation of 18.4% annual Internet penetration growth, based on 3-year historical growth from 2009-11, 1.25%
annual population growth based on five-year historical growth in 144 developing countries 2. ITU reports that
between 2009-11, Internet penetration CAGR in developing economies was 18.4% while in developed economies it
was 4.7%
Source: ITU, UN Population database

However, nearly 25% fewer developing world


women are online than men a gap that soars to
over 40% in sub-Saharan Africa

Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

This gap is forecasted to perpetuate and widen

Forecasted Internet access for women and men in


mber ofdeveloping
Internet userscountries
4/9/15
4/9/15

350M1 Gender gap


1.4B

Internet Users

1.5B
200M Gender gap
1B

1.05B

800M
600M

500M
4/9/15

4/9/
4/9/
If Internet usage
increases
at
the
same
15
15 rate for both
men and women,
in 3 years the gender gap will balloon from 200 to 350
million
Assumes 18.4% annual Internet penetration growth, based on 3-year historical growth from 2008-2011, 1.25% annual

1.
population growth based on five-year historical growth in 144 developing countries
Source: ITU, UN Population database

Causes and effects of the Internet gender gap


occur at the level of the individual, her
community
and her country
CAUSE
EFFECT
What factors influence or hinder
Internet access and use among
women and girls?

What are the anticipated


benefits as a result of increased
access and use?

Individual
or Micro
Factors

Individual or
Micro
Outcomes

Awareness
Ability
Environment

Esteem and
Expression
Opportunities
Knowledge and
Networks

Ecosystem or
Macro
Factors

Increase
d
Internet
Access
and Use

Ecosystem
or Macro
Outcomes

Infrastructure
Economic
Products and
Development
Players
Gender Equality
Policies
Diversity and
GenderGrowth
Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Responsive
Dalberg analysis

Analysis across country data reveals regional


variations

How important is access to Internet


to your daily life?

How long have you been


using the Internet for?

% of respondents

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

% of respondents selecting, Essential or Very


Important
4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15 4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

To what extent is the Internet


fun?

selecting, Describes very well

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

To what extent does the Internet


give me greater freedom?

% of respondents selecting, Describes very well

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

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There are regional variances for non-use of


internet
Why do you not currently use the Internet (more often)?

et non-user respondents, multiple selections okay

CULTURE

INFRASTRUCTURE

ABILITY

My family/friends
Lack easy access to
would disapprove a platform with Internet
4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

Im not familiar or
comfortable with
the technology
4/9/15

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15
4/9/15

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However consistent themes emerge


Because of the
Internet, I feel I
am more
confident

What is often perceived


as technophobia in reality
results primarily from
gender norms and
unequal opportunities

Internet
empowers the
masses and
especially the
women
Internet is not
appropriate for
me. For me, it is
not neededthat
is my parents
thinking.

If a family buys a computer, it will be for


the son because he may end up with a job
in IT. But if a family has two or three
daughters, they dont want them online
because of fears they may meet boys.
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Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews

Across all demographic and geographic divisions,


the beneficial impact of the Internet is clear. . .

Internet access empowers women,


boosts income, and raises income
potential

70%

85%

say
the Internet
provides
more

freedom
80%

use the
Internet to improve
their

education

find
the Internet
liberating

45%

use the
Internet to
search for and
apply for a job

30%

use the
Internet to earn
additional
income

Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

13

. . . and interestingly, accessing the Internet via


multiple platforms is key to unleashing these
benefits

Which describe benefits Internet access has


brought to you?
% of respondents
25%

Have used to search/


apply for a job

Greater employment opportunities


by expanding networks
Improved education/
studies
Have earned
additional income

50%

75%

100%

4/9/15 more benefits

4/9/15 more benefits

4/9/15 more benefits

4/9/15 more benefits

Multi-platform users
Mobile or Non-mobile platform only user

Multi-platform respondents were also +30% more likely


to cite the
Internet as essential to their daily lives than other
Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico,users
August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

14

There is a need to create 150M additional women


internet users
1.2 B Women and girls on the internet within three
years
4/9/15M

4/9/15B

4/9/15

4/9/15

4/9/15M

4/9/15M

4/9/15

4/9/15

Estimation of 18.4% annual Internet penetration growth, based on 3-year historical growth from
2009-11, 1.25% annual population growth based on five-year historical growth in 144
developing countries 2. ITU reports that between 2009-11, Internet penetration CAGR in
developing economies was 18.4% while in developed economies it was 4.7%
2. The gender gap represents 200M women and girls today, but given continued growth of
Internet access it will
represent ~350M women and girls in three years. The 150M women are 40% of the 350M

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The financial and economic case that emerges is


equally compelling

600
million

1.2
billion

Unleashes

billion
$50-70
USD untapped
market
opportunity for
data and
devices

billion
$ 13-18
USD in
additional GDP
across 144
countries

Source: Intel funded surveys in Uganda, Egypt, India and Mexico, August-September 2012; Expert interviews;
Dalberg analysis

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In conclusion, doubling the women and girls online


within three years is an urgent imperative for all

Initial Pathways for Action


1
1) Build

2
3 Incentivize
1)Deepen
coalitions
and
entreprene
for action
expand
urs
and
partnersh
to create
advocacy
ips with
womenmobile
centric
operators
content
4
5
1)Identify,
1)Track
foster and
how
engage
women
women
and girls
ICT
access
Source: Dalberg analysis
leaders in
and use

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Contact Information

For further information, please contact:


Renee Wittemyer, Intel. Renee.Wittemyer@intel.com
Andria Thomas, Dalberg.
Andria.Thomas@dalberg.com
Anne Makhulo, Dalberg.
Anne.Makhulo@dalberg.com

Thank you!
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