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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

An atom loses an electron to another atom. Is this


an example of a physical or a chemical change?
A. Physical change involving the formation of negative ions.
B. Chemical change involving the formation of negative ions.
C. Physical change involving the formation of positive ions.
D. Chemical change involving the formation of positive ions.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

An atom loses an electron to another atom. Is this


an example of a physical or a chemical change?
A. Physical change involving the formation of negative ions.
B. Chemical change involving the formation of negative ions.
C. Physical change involving the formation of positive ions.
D. Chemical change involving the formation of positive
ions.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

The neon atom tends NOT to gain any additional


electrons because
A. its nuclear charge is not great enough.
B. that would result in a positive ion.
C. of the repulsions they would experience with electrons in
the same shell.
D. there is no more room available in its outermost occupied
shell.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

The neon atom tends NOT to gain any additional


electrons because
A. its nuclear charge is not great enough.
B. that would result in a positive ion.
C. of the repulsions they would experience with electrons in
the same shell.
D. there is no more room available in its outermost
occupied shell.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Magnesium ions carry a 2+ charge, and chloride ions
carry a 1 charge. What is the chemical formula for the
ionic compound magnesium chloride?
A. MgCl
B. Mg2Cl
C. MgCl2
D. Mg2Cl2

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Magnesium ions carry a 2+ charge, and chloride ions
carry a 1 charge. What is the chemical formula for the
ionic compound magnesium chloride?
A. MgCl
B. Mg2Cl
C. MgCl2
D. Mg2Cl2

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


A hydrogen atom does not form more than one covalent
bond, because it

A.
B.
C.
D.

has only one shell of electrons.


has only one electron to share.
loses its valence electron so readily.
has such a strong electronegativity.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


A hydrogen atom does not form more than one covalent
bond, because it

A.
B.
C.
D.

has only one shell of electrons.


has only one electron to share.
loses its valence electron so readily.
has such a strong electronegativity.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Classify the following bond as ionic, covalent, or metallic
(Na, atomic number 11; Cl, atomic number 17)
Na with Cl
A.
B.
C.
D.

Na with Na

metallic, covalent, covalent


ionic, metallic, covalent
ionic, ionic, covalent
covalent, metallic, ionic

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Cl with Cl

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Classify the following bond as ionic, covalent, or metallic
(Na, atomic number 11; Cl, atomic number 17)
Na with Cl
A.
B.
C.
D.

Na with Na

metallic, covalent, covalent


ionic, metallic, covalent
ionic, ionic, covalent
covalent, metallic, ionic

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Cl with Cl

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


In terms of the periodic table, is there an abrupt or gradual
change between ionic and covalent bonds?
A. An abrupt change that occurs across the metalloids.
B. Actually, any element of the periodic table can form a covalent
bond.
C. There is a gradual change: the farther apart, the more ionic.
D. Whether an element forms one or the other depends on nuclear
charge and not the relative positions in the periodic table.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


In terms of the periodic table, is there an abrupt or gradual
change between ionic and covalent bonds?
A. An abrupt change that occurs across the metalloids.
B. Actually, any element of the periodic table can form a covalent
bond.
C. There is a gradual change: the farther apart, the more ionic.
D. Whether an element forms one or the other depends on nuclear
charge and not the relative positions in the periodic table.

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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which bond is most polar?

A. H-N
B. N-C
C. C-C
D. O-H

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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which bond is most polar?

A. H-N
B. N-C
C. C-C
D. O-H

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Is the air in your house a homogeneous or a
heterogeneous mixture?
A. Homogeneous, because it is mixed very well.
B. Heterogeneous, because of the dust particles it contains.
C. Homogeneous, because it is all at the same temperature.
D. Heterogeneous, because it consists of different types of
molecules.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Is the air in your house a homogeneous or a
heterogeneous mixture?
A. Homogeneous, because it is mixed very well.
B. Heterogeneous, because of the dust particles it
contains.
C. Homogeneous, because it is all at the same temperature.
D. Heterogeneous, because it consists of different types of
molecules.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Many dry cereals are fortified with iron, which is added
in the form of small iron particles. How might these
particles be separated from the cereal?
A. Add water, and the iron particles will float to the top.
B. Blend the cereal to a fine consistency and pass through a
filter.
C. Collect the iron filings with a magnet.
D. Heat the cereal so that the iron particles melt and thereby
coalesce.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Many dry cereals are fortified with iron, which is added
in the form of small iron particles. How might these
particles be separated from the cereal?
A. Add water, and the iron particles will float to the top.
B. Blend the cereal to a fine consistency and pass through a
filter.
C. Collect the iron filings with a magnet.
D. Heat the cereal so that the iron particles melt and thereby
coalesce.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Hydrogen chloride, HCl, is a gas at room temperature.
Would you expect this material to be very soluble or not
very soluble in water?
A. HCl is very soluble in water by virtue of the dipole/dipole
attractions occurring between the HCl and H2O molecules.
B. It is not very soluble because it is a gas, and all gases have very
low solubility in water at room temperature.
C. HCl is very soluble in water, because it is such a small molecule,
there is little electrical attraction to other HCl molecules.
D. It is not very soluble, because as a gas with low density, it floats to
the surface of the water and then into the surrounding
atmosphere.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Hydrogen chloride, HCl, is a gas at room temperature.
Would you expect this material to be very soluble or not
very soluble in water?
A. HCl is very soluble in water by virtue of the dipole/dipole
attractions occurring between the HCl and H2O molecules.
B. It is not very soluble because it is a gas, and all gases have very
low solubility in water at room temperature.
C. HCl is very soluble in water, because it is such a small molecule,
there is little electrical attraction to other HCl molecules.
D. It is not very soluble, because as a gas with low density, it floats to
the surface of the water and then into the surrounding
atmosphere.

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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Would you expect to find more dissolved oxygen in cold
polar or warm tropical ocean waters? Why?
A. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the tropical oceans,
because intense tropical storms mix up the atmospheric oxygen
into the ocean water.
B. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the polar oceans,
because the colder oxygen would sink and dissolve into the
water.
C. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the tropical oceans,
because the heated oxygen molecules in the air would collide with
and mix into the water.
D. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the polar oceans,
because the solubility of oxygen in water decreases with
increasing temperature.
Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Would you expect to find more dissolved oxygen in cold
polar or warm tropical ocean waters? Why?
A. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the tropical oceans,
because intense tropical storms mix up the atmospheric oxygen
into the ocean water.
B. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the polar oceans,
because the colder oxygen would sink and dissolve into the
water.
C. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the tropical oceans,
because the heated oxygen molecules in the air would collide with
and mix into the water.
D. There would be more dissolved oxygen in the polar oceans,
because the solubility of oxygen in water decreases with
increasing temperature.
Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Fish dont live very long in water that has just been boiled
and brought back to room temperature. Suggest why.
A. There is now a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 in the water.
B. The nutrients in the water have been destroyed.
C. Because some of the water was evaporated while boiling, the
salts in the water are now more concentrated. This has a negative
effect on the fish.
D. The boiling process removes the air that was dissolved in the
water. Upon cooling, the water is void of its usual air content;
hence, the fish drown.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Fish dont live very long in water that has just been boiled
and brought back to room temperature. Suggest why.
A. There is now a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 in the water.
B. The nutrients in the water have been destroyed.
C. Because some of the water was evaporated while boiling, the
salts in the water are now more concentrated. This has a negative
effect on the fish.
D. The boiling process removes the air that was dissolved in the
water. Upon cooling, the water is void of its usual air content;
hence, the fish drown.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following intermolecular forces best
describes why nonpolar molecules like gasoline
(C8H18) have only limited solubility in water?
A. Dipoledipole.
B. Induced dipoleinduced dipole.
C. Hydrogen bonding.
D. Dipoleinduced dipole.
E. Iondipole.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following intermolecular forces best
describes why nonpolar molecules like gasoline
(C8H18) have only limited solubility in water?
A. Dipoledipole.
B. Induced dipoleinduced dipole.
C. Hydrogen bonding.
D. Dipoleinduced dipole.
E. Iondipole.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


A glass of water contains on the order of a trillion trillion
(1 1024) molecules. If 0.0001% of these molecules were
some impurity, about how many molecules would this be?
A.

1000
(one thousand: 1 103)

B.

1,000,000
(one million: 1 106)

C.

1,000,000,000
(one billion: 1 109)

D.

1,000,000,000,000,000,000
(one million trillion: 1 1018)

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


A glass of water contains on the order of a trillion trillion
(1 1024) molecules. If 0.0001% of these molecules were
some impurity, about how many molecules would this be?
A.

1000
(one thousand: 1 103)

B.

1,000,000
(one million: 1 106)

C.

1,000,000,000
(one billion: 1 109)

D.

1,000,000,000,000,000,000
(one million trillion: 1 1018)

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


How would you respond in defense of waters purity if
it contained thousands of molecules of some impurity
per glass?
A.

Impurities arent necessarily bad; in fact, they may be


good for you.

B.

The water contains water molecules, and each water


molecule is pure.

C.

Theres no defense. If the water contains impurities, it


should not be drunk.

D.

Compared to the billions and billions of water


molecules, a thousand molecules of something else is
practically nothing.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


How would you respond in defense of waters purity if
it contained thousands of molecules of some impurity
per glass?
A.

Impurities arent necessarily bad; in fact, they may be


good for you.

B.

The water contains water molecules, and each water


molecule is pure.

C.

Theres no defense. If the water contains impurities, it


should not be drunk.

D.

Compared to the billions and billions of water


molecules, a thousand molecules of something
else is practically nothing.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The valence electron of a sodium atom does not
sense the full +11 of the sodium nucleus. Why not?
A. There are two inner shells of electrons containing ten electrons
shielding the sodium nucleus from sensing it.
B. The distance from the nucleus to the loosely held lone valence
electron varies greatly over time. So, the average sense of
charge from the nucleus is considerably less than +11.
C. Because the +11 charge is spread evenly around the entire
spherical surface of the nucleus, the actual force of the
charge in any given direction is greatly diminished.
D. There are two non-valence shell electrons shielding the sodium
nucleus from sensing it.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The valence electron of a sodium atom does not
sense the full +11 of the sodium nucleus. Why not?
A. There are two inner shells of electrons containing ten
electrons shielding the sodium nucleus from sensing it.
B. The distance from the nucleus to the loosely held lone valence
electron varies greatly over time. So, the average sense of
charge from the nucleus is considerably less than +11.
C. Because the +11 charge is spread evenly around the entire
spherical surface of the nucleus, the actual force of the
charge in any given direction is greatly diminished.
D. There are two non-valence shell electrons shielding the sodium
nucleus from sensing it.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The neon atom tends NOT to lose any electrons, because

A. the ionization energy is so high.


B. that would result in a negative ion.
C. it has a relatively strong effective nuclear charge.
D. its electrons are paired together within the same orbitals.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The neon atom tends NOT to lose any electrons, because

A. the ionization energy is so high.


B. that would result in a negative ion.
C. it has a relatively strong effective nuclear charge.
D. its electrons are paired together within the same orbitals.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Atoms of metallic elements can form ionic bonds, but
they are not very good at forming covalent bonds.
Why?
A. These atoms are too large to be able to come in close contact
with other atoms.
B. They have a great tendency to lose electrons.
C. They are on the wrong side of the periodic table.
D. Their valence shells are already filled with electrons.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Atoms of metallic elements can form ionic bonds, but
they are not very good at forming covalent bonds.
Why?
A. These atoms are too large to be able to come in close contact
with other atoms.
B. They have a great tendency to lose electrons.
C. They are on the wrong side of the periodic table.
D. Their valence shells are already filled with electrons.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

How many electrons are used to draw the electron-dot


structure for hydrogen peroxide, a covalent compound
with the formula H2O2?
A. 14
B. 8
C. 7
D. 4

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

How many electrons are used to draw the electron-dot


structure for hydrogen peroxide, a covalent compound
with the formula H2O2?
A. 14
B. 8
C. 7
D. 4

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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The source of an atoms electronegativity is the
A. kinetic energy which electrons orbiting the nucleus have.
B.

repulsive force occurring among electrons within the same shell.

C. repulsive force occurring between electrons within neighboring shells.


D. effective nuclear charge.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The source of an atoms electronegativity is the
A. kinetic energy which electrons orbiting the nucleus have.
B.

repulsive force occurring among electrons within the same shell.

C. repulsive force occurring between electrons within neighboring shells.


D. effective nuclear charge.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Two molecules, A and B, have very different physical
properties. A and B do not mix. Molecule A boils at 80C and
freezes at 30C. Molecule B boils at 35C and freezes at
100C. Which molecule is likely to have the largest dipole?
A. Molecule A
B. Molecule B
C. Not enough information was given.
D. Both have similar dipoles.
E. Molecule A and molecule B are the same, but each has different
properties.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Two molecules, A and B, have very different physical
properties. A and B do not mix. Molecule A boils at 80C and
freezes at 30C. Molecule B boils at 35C and freezes at
100C. Which molecule is likely to have the largest dipole?
A. Molecule A
B. Molecule B
C. Not enough information was given.
D. Both have similar dipoles.
E. Molecule A and molecule B are the same, but each has different
properties.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

Magnesium chloride, MgCl2, crystals are composed of


A. a two-dimensional array of [-Mg-Cl-Cl-] units.
B. a multitude of Mg2+ ions and Cl ions grouped together in a
three-dimensional array with a 1:2 ratio of Mg2+ to Cl.
C. units of MgCl2 molecules held together by dipole interactions.
D. groups of Mg2+ ions and Cl2 molecules.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

Magnesium chloride, MgCl2, crystals are composed of


A. a two-dimensional array of [-Mg-Cl-Cl-] units.
B. a multitude of Mg2+ ions and Cl- ions grouped together
in a three-dimensional array with a 1:2 ratio of Mg 2+ to
Cl .
C. units of MgCl2 molecules held together by dipole interactions.
D. groups of Mg2+ ions and Cl2 molecules.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

When nitrogen and fluorine combine to form a


molecule, the most likely chemical formula is
A. N3F
B. N2F
C. NF4
D. NF
E. NF

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

When nitrogen and fluorine combine to form a


molecule, the most likely chemical formula is
A. N3F
B. N2F
C. NF4
D. NF
E. NF

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The charges with sodium chloride are all balancedfor every positive
sodium ion, there is a corresponding negative chloride ion. Because its
charges are balanced, how can sodium chloride be attracted to water,
and vice versa?
A. This is not a matter of attraction. Sodium chloride dissolves in water, because
water provides a medium in which the individual sodium and chloride ions
can disperse.
B. Dispersion forces come into play as the sodium chloride and water come into
close proximity.
C. Hydrogen bonding in water allows the sodium chloride molecule to be
attracted to the water molecule.
D. As a water molecule gets close to the sodium chloride, it can distinguish the
various ions. It is thus attracted to an individual ion by iondipole forces.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The charges with sodium chloride are all balancedfor
every positive sodium ion, there is a corresponding negative
chloride ion. Because its charges are balanced, how can
sodium chloride be attracted to water, and vice versa?
A. This is not a matter of attraction. Sodium chloride dissolves in water,
because water provides a medium in which the individual sodium and
chloride ions can disperse.
B. Dispersion forces come into play as the sodium chloride and water
come into close proximity.
C. Hydrogen bonding in water allows the sodium chloride molecule to
be attracted to the water molecule.
D. As a water molecule gets close to the sodium chloride, it can
distinguish the various ions. It is thus attracted to an individual
ion by iondipole forces.
Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Why are iondipole attractions stronger than
dipoledipole attractions?
A. The chemical bond in an iondipole molecule is
similar to a covalent bond.
B. Like charge (dipole) does not attract like charge
(another dipole).
C. Dipole areas are subject to changing from positive to
negative regions on the molecule.
D. The magnitude of the electric charge associated
with an ion is much greater.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Why are iondipole attractions stronger than
dipoledipole attractions?
A. The chemical bond in an iondipole molecule is
similar to a covalent bond.
B. Like charge (dipole) does not attract like charge
(another dipole).
C. Dipole areas are subject to changing from positive to
negative regions on the molecule.
D. The magnitude of the electric charge
associated with an ion is much greater.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following intermolecular forces best
describes why nonpolar molecules like gasoline
(C8H18) have only limited solubility in water?
A. Dipoledipole.
B. Induced dipoleinduced dipole.
C. Hydrogen bonding.
D. Dipoleinduced dipole.
E. Iondipole.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following intermolecular forces best
describes why nonpolar molecules like gasoline
(C8H18) have only limited solubility in water?
A. Dipoledipole.
B. Induced dipoleinduced dipole.
C. Hydrogen bonding.
D. Dipoleinduced dipole.
E. Iondipole.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Dipoleinduced dipole forces of attraction exist
between water and gasoline, and yet these two
substances do not mix, because water has such a
strong attraction for itself.

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Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following compounds might best help to make water
and gasoline mix into a single liquid phase?

A. The molecule in the middlebecause when the salts mix into the
water, it will help separate the water and decrease the attraction for
itself.
B. The molecule on the far leftbecause the O-H bond is polar, and the
carbon and hydrogen bonds are nonpolar.
C. The molecule on the right will form attractions with the polar ends of the
water, allowing the gasoline a chance to mix with the water.
D. All of these molecules would be equally effective at increasing the mixing
of gasoline and water.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


Which of the following compounds might best help to make water
and gasoline mix into a single liquid phase?

A. The molecule in the middlebecause when the salts mix into the
water, it will help separate the water and decrease the attraction for
itself.
B. The molecule on the far leftbecause the O-H bond is polar, and the
carbon and hydrogen bonds are nonpolar.
C. The molecule on the right will form attractions with the polar ends of the
water, allowing the gasoline a chance to mix with the water.
D. All of these molecules would be equally effective at increasing the mixing
of gasoline and water.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The boiling point of 1,4-butanediol is 230C. Would you
expect this compound to be soluble or insoluble in roomtemperature water?

A. Because there are no polar areas on this molecule, it is insoluble in water


at room temperature.
B. A high boiling point means that the substance interacts with itself quite
strongly. Therefore, this molecule is not soluble in water.
C. Because there are polar areas on this molecule, it is insoluble in water at
room temperature.
D. Water would be attracted to both ends of 1,4-butanediol, and it is
infinitely soluble in water.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12


The boiling point of 1,4-butanediol is 230C. Would you
expect this compound to be soluble or insoluble in roomtemperature water?

A. Because there are no polar areas on this molecule, it is insoluble in water


at room temperature.
B. A high boiling point means that the substance interacts with itself quite
strongly. Therefore, this molecule is not soluble in water.
C. Because there are polar areas on this molecule, it is insoluble in water at
room temperature.
D. Water would be attracted to both ends of 1,4-butanediol, and it is
infinitely soluble in water.

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

What is the molarity of 0.5 liters of a solution with


five moles of sucrose in it?
A. 0.5 molar
B. 2.5 molar
C. 10 molar
D. 1 molar
E. 5 molar

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

What is the molarity of 0.5 liters of a solution with


five moles of sucrose in it?
A. 0.5 molar
B. 2.5 molar
C. 10 molar
D. 1 molar
E. 5 molar

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

Which of the following substances should be most


soluble in hexane, CH3CH2CH2CH2CH2CH3?
A. I2
B. CH3CH2OH
C. H2O
D. HF
E. NaCl

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley

Conceptual Integrated ScienceChapter 12

Which of the following substances should be most


soluble in hexane, CH3CH2CH2CH2CH2CH3?
A. I2
B. CH3CH2OH
C. H2O
D. HF
E. NaCl

Copyright 2007 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley