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STRATEGIC PLAN for a globally competitive

21st century university: the Ibadan experience

by
O. A. Bamiro
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
c/o Faculty of Technology
University of Ibadan
oabamiro@yahoo.com
Delivered on 23rd October 2014 at the Workshop on FUTA Strategic
Plan (2015-2020) held at the Ikogosi Warm Spring Resorts, Ikogosi,
Ekiti State

Simply pushing harder within


the old boundaries will not do
"Vision without Action is a
daydream, Action without
Vision is a nightmare. Action
with Vision is a World Ahead
Intel

Why Strategic Plan?


SP is a conscious process by which an
institution assesses its current state and the
likely future condition of its environment,
identifies possible future states for itself, and
then develops organised strategies, policies
and procedures for getting to one or more of
them.
(Peterson 1980)
SP seeks to answer the questions:
What is this university about?
What would we like it to be?
What should that entail?
How can we get there?
(Hayward, 2003)

Why Strategic Plan?


The SP process helps to provide an
overview of the institution in an open and
transparent way that is often not possible in
individual interviews and meetings. It
allows leaders to explore current values,
missions, and goals and to examine them in
the context of the current state of the
institution, the community, the national
economic and political setting, and the
international environment. Understanding
the current context, existing goals, and
institutional aspirations marks an important
starting point for thinking about the future.

Corporate Internal Scrutiny


Accomplishing such task calls for a
fundamental understanding of the
university system, sensing the
opportunities and problems that it faces,
dealing effectively with strategic
decisions, and setting in place the people
and operations to implement those
decisions; in other words, putting in place
proper structure for strategic plan
implementation as distinct from the adhocism that seems to characterize the
handling of strategic issues in the system.

Corporate Internal Scrutiny


The process involves a comprehensive
understanding of the present
strengths and weaknesses/challenges,
opportunities and threats (SWOT or
SCOT) and the required strengths with
which sustainable advantage will be
achieved through building on the
strengths (internal), addressing the
challenges (external) and threats
(external) while exploiting the
opportunities (internal).

Corporate Internal Scrutiny


New

world realities are challenging our adaptive


capacities. We must develop our adaptive capacities
rather than our technical capacities. We must
distinguish between adaptive and technical work.
Businesses (universities) should adopt systems
thinking and the systemic analysis approach in
evaluating the environment and devising strategies.
Leadership should focus on exercising leadership
rather on the person of leader.
Annabel Beerel in Leadership through Strategic
Planning

Universities everywhere require leadership


and expertise capable of participating in
an increasingly complex and globalised
world. Universities can demonstrate
world-class thinking and policy
development in the sense that they
employ state-of-the-art solutions to
pressing challenges of the twenty first
century.
Altbach
One of these solutions is the development
and implementation of a strategic plan.
Institutions must think globally without
losing sight of their national and local
environments.

THE STRUCTURE OF PRESENTATION


What

are universities for?


World-Class University or Globally Competitive 21st
Century University: What is it? The challenge of
building one.
The Basic Features of Strategic Planning and its
Implementation
The University of Ibadan Experience
Concluding Remarks

WHAT ARE UNIVERSITIES


FOR?

John Cardinal Newmans century old


idea was predicated on universities
being seen as enclaves, separate
from the everyday world; places
where students and academics
engaged in platonic dialogues and
where the outcome for both was a
deeper understanding of the world
and their place in it.

Newman was adamantly against


vocational courses (and research,
for that matter). Newman
described "practical knowledge" as
"a deal of trash". He thought that
medicine was too applied to be
taught at a real university.
>>>>>> Ivory
Tower

Current Global Trend


In the last two decades, higher education worldwide
has moved from the periphery to the centre of
governmental agendas in most countries.
Universities are now seen as crucial national assets
in addressing many policy priorities, and as:
sources of new knowledge and innovative thinking;
providers of skilled personnel;
contributors to innovation;
attractors of international talent and business
investment;
agents of social justice and mobility;
contributors to social and cultural vitality; and
determinants of health and well-being. (Boulton)
>>> Economic growth-oriented model

What are universities for ?

Notwithstanding their diversity of functions,


governments focus on the presumed direct
economic role of universities based on the
assumption that there is a direct, linear inout relationship between economic
outcomes and investment in university
research - particularly in science - which has
produced welcome investment, and while
many governments are asking "how can we
make investments in universities that will
help us out of the recession?. There is a
temptation for universities to promise what
we cannot deliver.

This

is a something for
something deal. This is not just a
closing of the gap. It is an
investment by the Scottish
government
Mark Batho, Chief Executive of
the
Scottish Funding Council
(SFC) while
announcing 1.02
billion of funding in 2012/2013
for the 19 Scottish HEIs.

The SFC and individual universities had to


draw up agreements in areas such as:
Access
Retention
Flexible degrees
The employability of students
Translating research into more
opportunities for Scottish business.
sanctions would have to be part of the
process. If it does not have any teeth it
wont be worth the paper its written on .
Bartho

What are universities for


The ? university's
concern
is
'useful

knowledge', but not merely with the


immediately applicable - a university is a
resource for an unknown future.
A university that moulds itself only to
present demands is one that is not listening
to its historians. Today's preoccupations are
inevitably myopic, often ephemeral, giving
little thought
for tomorrow. (Boulton)
>>> Need to promote both basic and
applied research.

Wet Blankets
Drill

for oil? You mean drill into the


ground to try and find oil? Youre crazy.
Drillers who Edwin L. Drake tried to enlist
to his project to drill for oil in 1859.
This
telephone
has
too
many
shortcomings to be seriously considered
as a means of communication. The
device is inherently of no value to us.
Western Union internal memo, 1876.

Wet Blankets
Heavier

than air flying machines are


impossible.
Lord Kelvin, President, Royal Society, 1895.

The

bomb will never go off. I speak as


an expert in explosives.
Admiral William Leahy, US Atomic Bomb
Project. [And, of course, the bombs more
than went off. Ask the Japanese.]

Airplanes

are interesting toys but of no


military value.

Marechal Ferdinand Foch, Professor of


Strategy, Ecole Superieure de Guerre. France

Wet Blankets
Man

will never reach the moon


regardless of all future scientific
advances.
Dr. Lee De Forest, inventor of the
vacuum tube and the father of
television.

Everything

that can be invented


has been invented.
Charles H. Duell, Commissioner, US
office of patents, 1899.

Teaching and Research


The best research and the best teaching
depend upon a culture and individual attitudes
that value curiosity, skepticism, serendipity
and creativity. They are values that are crucial
to the university educational process at its
most profound, and are most readily acquired
in an environment of free-ranging speculation
and research. The transfer of research-derived
understanding into society by graduates who
embody it is probably the most powerful
vector by which it reaches society; more
important than publications, than spin-outs
and technology transfer offices. (Boulton)

What are universities for?


The central role of a university is education .
Generation by generation universities serve to
make students think. They do so by feeding and
training their instinct to understand and seek
meaning. True teaching disturbs complacency.
They are taught to question interpretations that
are given to them, to reduce the chaos of
information to the order of an analytical argument
and to seek out what is relevant to the resolution
of a problem. They learn progressively to identify
problems for themselves and to resolve them by
rational argument supported by evidence: and
they learn not to be dismayed by complexity but to
be capable and daring in unravelling it. [Boulton]

Such fundanmental qualities form the


bedrock that enables the practical skills
needed by society to be most intelligently
deployed. Many of the qualities prized by
government and business - entrepreneurship,
managerial capacity, leadership, vision,
teamwork, adaptability and the effective
application of specific technical skills - are not
primary features, but derivatives from these
more fundamental qualities.
- Boulton

Unfortunately, rather than ensuring that our graduates


are adaptive, competent and intellectually bold, we
increasingly focus on developing highly specific
technical skills deployed in predictable settings. We
have been concerned with: the derivatives rather than
the fundamentals; what is learned rather than how it
is learned; training for the short term rather than
education for life. [Boulton]

What are universities for?


Universities are important parts of the
modern innovation process, but not as its
drivers.
Universities have a different role, which is to help
create an environment sympathetic to and
supportive of innovation, and particularly where
there is internationally-competitive research and
excellent graduates. They produce centers of
creativity that attract research-intensive companies
and investment into a region, and help catalyze
innovation in indigenous businesses. The bedrock for
this potential remains, however, the university's
commitment to education and the exploration,
through research, of the limits of our understanding.

The Overall Challenge


Our

universities are expected to produce not only


products with the requisite skills set to drive the
economy, but, also, most importantly, to engage in
research and innovation for socio-economic
development.
Helping to transform our economy from resourcedriven to knowledge-driven.
This will necessarily involve our transformation into
world-class institutions to gain relevance. A
technology-concerned institution such as the
Federal University of Technology, Akure has an
important role to play in transforming the
economic space if it comes to grip with the above
realities as it charts its way forward in the
current exercise of developing a strategic plan.

Global Ranking- What is it?


Ranking of world universities published by the
Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) in
September 2005 created a major controversy
in Malaysia when it showed the country's top
two universities slipping almost 100 places
compared with those of the previous year.
Notwithstanding the fact that the big drop was
mostly the result of a change in the ranking
methodology - which was a little known fact
and of limited comfort - the news was so
traumatic that there were widespread calls for
the establishment of a royal commission of
inquiry to investigate the matter.

A few weeks later, the ViceChancellor of the University of


Malaya stepped down. This strong
reaction was not out of character for
a nation whose current Ninth
Development Plan aims at shaping
the transformation of the country into
a knowledge-based economy with
emphasis
on
the
important
contribution of the university sector.
Jamil Salmi

Ten Topmost Ranked Universities: 2012


RANK SHANGHAI RANKING

THES RANKING

Harvard University

California Inst. of Tech

Stanford University

Stanford University

Massachusetts Inst. of
Tech

University of Oxford

University of California,
Berkley

Harvard University

Cambridge University

Massachusetts Inst. of Tech

California Inst. of Tech

Princeton University

Princeton University

Cambridge University

Columbia University

Imperial College, London

University of Chicago

University of California,
Berkley

10

University of Oxford

University of Chicago

Shanghai Ranking Criteria for Universities


Criterion
Indicator
Weight
Quality of Alumni of an institution
10%
Education winning Nobel Prizes and
Fields Medals
Quality of Staff of an institution
20%
Faculty
winning Nobel Prizes and
Fields Medals

Research
Output

Highly cited researchers


in 21 broad subject
categories

20%

Papers published in top


outlets

20%

Papers indexed in
Science Citation Indexexpanded and Social
Science Citation Index

20%

Times Higher Education Supplement


(THES)
(13 PIs grouped into 5 areas)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Teaching: the learning environment


(30% of overall ranking score)
Research: volume, income and
reputation (30%)
Citations: research influence (30%)
Industry income: innovation (2.5%)
International outlook: staff, students
and research (7.5%)

Universities

are excluded from the


THES World University rankings if
they do not teach undergraduates;
if they teach only a single narrow
subject; or if their research output
amounted to fewer than 1,000
articles between 2006 and 2010
(200 a year)
The Universities that feature among
the top 100 in the world rankings
have been labelled World Class
Universities.

What is a world-class
university?

everyone wants one,


no one knows what it
is, and no one knows
how to get one
Altbach 2004

Attributes of a World-Class
University/Globally Competitive 21st
Century University
Highly

qualified faculty
Excellence in research
Quality teaching
High levels of government and non-government
sources of funding
International and highly talented students
Academic freedom
Well-defined autonomous governance structures
Well-equipped facilities for teaching, research,
administration and student life.
International reputation of the university
Universitys contribution to society

Jamils Model
Superior results of world-class institutions
(highly sought graduates, leading-edge research,
and technology transfer) can essentially be
attributed to three complementary sets of factors
at play in top universities:
High concentration of talent (faculty and
students)
Able to attract the most qualified professors and
teachers
Ability and the privilege to select the most
academically qualified students
A high proportion of carefully selected graduate
students

Weight of graduate
students

35

Jamils Model

Abundant resources to offer a rich


learning environment and to conduct
advanced research:
Budget allocation by the proprietor
Tuitions fees
Contract research from public and
private firms and agencies
Financial returns generated by
endowments and gifts.

Jamils Model
Favourable governance features that encourage
strategic vision, innovation, and flexibility that
enable institutions to make decisions and to
manage resources without being encumbered by
bureaucracy:
The overall regulatory framework
The degree of academic and managerial
autonomy that the university enjoys
The university can manage its resources with
agility and quickly respond to the demands of a
rapidly changing global market

Jamils Model
Favourable governance:

An

inspiring and persistent leaders, a strong


strategic vision of where the institution is going
A philosophy of success and excellence
A culture of constant reflection, organizational
learning and change
Less cumbersome bureaucracies and externally
imposed standards

World Class University (WCU) or ServiceIntensive University (SIU)


According to Pai Obanya:
SIU paradigm is not in total disagreement with
the research intensive posture of WCU. It is
instead an attempt at enhancing the social
responsiveness of universities in Africa. This
means that the development challenges of Africa
must be the core concern areas for African
universities. Knowledge is the best tool for
getting Africa out of underdevelopment.
The knowledge arsenal of a university is derived
from its knowledge generation (or research),
knowledge transmission (or Teaching),
knowledge transfer (or responsive social
engagement)

Checklist at Institutional Level


How

can the institution build the best leadership team?


What are the vision and mission statements, and what
are the specific goals that the university is seeking to
achieve?
In what niche(s) will it pursue excellence in teaching
and research?
What is the target student population?
What are the internationalization goals that the
university needs to achieve (with regard to faculty,
students, programmes, and so forth)?
What is the likely cost of the proposed qualitative leap,
and how is it going to be funded?
How will success be measured? What monitoring
systems, outcome indicators, and accountability
mechanisms will be used?

ELEMENTS IN STRATEGIC PLANNING


The

highest body of an institution i.e. the


governing council in tertiary
institutions
All stakeholders of the institution
A committee with small sample size
representing all interest groups of the
institution
Environmental scanning or SWOT analysis
Core values, vision, mission, gap analysis
and implementation plan
Monitoring , evaluation and feedback
mechanisms

STRATEGIC
PLANNING
PROCESS

The Strategic Planning Process


(Chinese University of Hong Kong)
The

drafting involved the Governing Council,


Senate and the Administrative and Planning
Committee (AAPC)
The Strategic Plan, in a draft outline form, was
widely disseminated to the staff, students and
alumni.
In addition, 16 forums and briefing sessions
were held and a total of 35 written submissions
were received.
The Senate considered the Strategic Plan after
the incorporation of many of the views
collected during the consultation.
Finally the Council adopted it subject to minor
amendments.

NEVER A ONE-PERSON OR A ONE-TEAM


SHOW

THREE INTER-RELATED WORKING


GROUPS
The

Core Technical Team is a relatively


small multi-interest body to coordinate
all planning related activities, the
kernel of the entire process.
The Expanded Technical Team, into
which the core technical team is
embedded offers specialised services
to the planning process through a
combination of a number of subworking teams.
The (larger) Stakeholder Group is the
entire corps of interest groups made up
of internal and external stakeholders.

FRAME WORK of ACTION


FOR STRATEGIC PLAN

Strategic objectives
Expected outcomes
Implementation strategies
Activities
Measurable verifiable indicators
Means of verification
Responsible officers
Assumptions
Costs of Implementation
Period of Implementation

IMPLEMENTATION
Involves

mobilizing and utilizing resources and


motivating staff to achieve the goals of the
strategic plan
Before actual implementation begins, it is
important to summarize the plan, showing how
it flows from the Institutional vision, mission,
values and objectives and how it is expected to
lead to the achievement of the desired position
for the institution, giving due reference to the
SWOT analysis.

48

IMPLEMENTATION: cont.
The

action plans must indicate what, who,


where, how and when implementation
would take place and its cost.
This means specifying the resources,
objectives, time-scales, deadlines, budgets
and performance targets for each action
plan.
Identify the focal person or unit to
implement each strategic objective.
49

Conditions for effective Implementation

Activities of the plan must be budgeted for


within the responsible department.

Build the capacity of those who will implement


the plan to make them more effective and
efficient.

High level support should be given to the


implementation by top management.

Strategic and accountable leadership needed.


50

MONITORING and EVALUATION

Monitoring helps to routinely check to ensure


that the implementation is moving the
institution in the right direction.

Evaluation is the process of collecting and


analyzing information to determine whether
implementation is moving according to the
planned activities and to know the extent to
which the desired goals are being achieved

51

FEEDBACK

It is important that all participants in the


strategic planning process be regularly informed
of progress made at various stages of the
project. This can serve as a motivating factor to
get them to give their best.

Feedback also has the potential to improve the


morale of the employees and create sense of
ownership of the strategic decisions made.

Both negative and positive results should be


communicated as fully as possible, as any
attempt to selectively give information often
produces costly consequences.
52

STRATEGIC PLANNING TOWARDS


BUILDING A GLOBALLY
COMPETITIVE UNIVERSITY: THE
UI EXPERIENCE

History of Strategic Plan in UI (I)

1952, 1957, 1961 and 1986: Era of Visitation


Panels Documents for self-evaluation.
1975 1980 : 5-Year Development Plan
mainly in search of social relevance
1980 1985 : Golden era of expansion (5-Year
Development Plan)
1985 1990 : Belt tightening and redressing
the excesses of the Past. (5-Year Development
Plan)
1995 : The work of the Committee to produce
the 1995-2000 Strategic plan was
inconclusive.
1998 : Another SP Committee ended with
the publication of Directions for a Strategic
Plan.

54

History of Strategic Plan in UI (II)

1999- 2001: Professor K. Adesogan Committee


worked on the UI Vision and Mission for the 21st
century (under Felix Ohiwerei Governing
Council). This led to the published document on
UI Vision and Mission. This involved wide
consultations of key stakeholders.
2006 :UI Governing Council under Gamaliel
Onosode held a Retreat at Ada, Oshun State and
revisited the Vision and Mission document
produced by Adesogan committee. The Retreat
was attended by members of the Governing
Council, Deans, Representative of NUC, some
of the former Vice-Chancellors, Representatives
of Students and Staff unions.
55

History of Strategic Plan in UI (III)


2007-2009: A 10-man committee, headed by Professor
Bamgboye (DVC, Admin), was set up to analyse
the Report of the Ada Retreat and consult widely.
The Committee met with key Stakeholders:
Deans, Heads of Departments
Members of staff : teaching and non-teaching
Staff and Students Unions
Community leaders and Congregation
UI Alumni Association
Leaders of business organisations,
Students and other interested groups
56

History of Strategic Plan in UI (IV)


In 2008, a Strategic Plan to internationalise
University of Ibadan was produced by the
Ekhaguere Committee in March 2008. The work
involved retreat and wide consultations.

57

History of Strategic Plan in UI


(v)

The Draft Report of the UI Strategic Plan was


produced followed by a Retreat to review the
report and produce the final report which was
approved by the Governing Council.
The Bamgboye committee produced the first
ever five-year Strategic Plan for University of
Ibadan tilted Promoting Excellence in
Teaching, Research and Community Service:
A Five-Year Strategic Plan (2009-2014)

Thus, the journey to the production of the authentic


UI Strategic Plan started with the Ohiwerei
Council followed by intellectual backing by the
Onosode Council. The report was finally
published by the Olanipekun Council.

58

First Activity by the Ohiwerei


Council: Carving a niche for UI
through our vision and mission
statements
Envisioning the future and carving a

niche for UI was based on our belief


that:
Any human undertaking in whatever form
must be guided by a vision of how to
position itself particularly in a competitive
environment.
A venture also needs to have a raison
dtre
What purpose it hopes to serve
What niche it must carve for itself
The mission it is pursuing to justify its
existence

HIGHLIGHTS OF ONOSODE COUNCIL


RETREAT AT ADA

Concerns on how to:


Improve the physical environment of the University
Improve the living conditions of students and staff
Improve the working conditions of staff
Improve the employment opportunities of graduates
Improve the teaching and learning conditions
Improve the finances of the University
Promote discipline and internal efficiencies in the
University affairs
Stimulate excellent training, research and services
Re-orientate the mind set of all staffs and Students of the
University of Ibadan for professionalism and team work
Internationalize University of Ibadan programmes
Wednesday, 19th
December 2012

60

The Vision Statement

To be a world-class
institution for academic
excellence geared towards
meeting societal needs

Research-Intensive or
Postgraduate University

Why Research-Intensive or PG
University?

Need for high-level skilled and innovative


human resources for the economy
Need for research capacity in all sectors of
the economy
Ph.D graduates for the higher education
institutions and research establishments
Considerable existing research manpower
in the University to run postgraduate
programmes

UI MISSION
To expand

the frontiers of knowledge through


provision of excellent conditions for learning
and research.
To produce graduates who are worthy in
character and sound judgment
To contribute to the transformation of society
through creativity and innovation
To serve as a dynamic custodian of societys
salutary values and thus sustain its integrity.

63

THE CORE VALUES OF UI 1

Striving to be the best in all that


we do
Being truthful, fair and accountable
in dealing with others
Respecting the dignity and rights of
all persons
Working to ensure the safety of our
students, staff and all persons

64

THE CORE VALUES OF UI 2

Fostering environments where


diverse views are sought and
respected
Encouraging and nurturing new
ideas that are in harmony with our
vision
Strongly believing that hard-work,
diligence, ethical and socially
responsible behavior is key to
maintaining our integrity.

65

THE KEY GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF


UI (EDISI)
(E)xcellence

(D)iversity
(I)nnovation
(S)ervice Delivery and Social
responsibility
(I)ntegrity

66

Integrity under EDIS(I)


Recruiting

Teaching and Non-teaching staff that are


hard-working, with high sense of dedication,
credibility and integrity, to be excellent role models to
students
Promoting hard-work, ethical behaviour and integrity
as the bedrock of academic issues, research and
outreach community services of the university
Accepting responsibility for our actions and choices
we make, and being confident in making value-added
differences when needed, conscious of the fact that
this is essential for maintaining the Universitys
leadership position in the nations education sector
Working with a strong assurance that if the staff
serves with a high sense of dignity, credibility and
integrity, the vision and mission of the University of
Ibadan would be achieved.

Highlights of SCOT Analysis:


Strengths
A relatively large number of highly qualified,
experienced and competent academic staff with great
potential for research (pure and applied), and mentoring
Good reputation, strong goodwill/name garnered from
many years of quality performance in the sector.
Global network of accomplished alumni with potential
commitment to the realization of the Universitys Vision
and Mission
A high enrolment of students for postgraduate studies
and a very virile Postgraduate School, widely
acknowledged as the flagship of postgraduate education,
training and research in Nigeria and sub-Saharan Africa.
A largely competitive and transparent admission process
(involving the Departments/Faculties) that pays
attention to the carrying capacity.

Highlights of SCOT Analysis:


Strengths
A campus-based university with considerable
real estate holdings to cater for academic,
administrative and residential (staff and
students) needs.
An active University Board of Advancement.
A virile and highly successful University
Endowment Fund with proven expertise in
investment of funds and management by
people with high integrity.
A budding research management and
administration office
A relatively strong financial management
system

Highlights of SCOT Analysis:


Threats
Uncertainty of Government subvention both in terms of
quantum and time of release
Inconsistent and poor implementation of policies government policy (autonomy, academic freedom,
inability to charge appropriate fees, etc.)
Conflicts arising from staff and student unionism.
Incessant national strikes
Ageing problem which translates to continual exit of
experienced staff.
Brain-drain (local and international)
Slow/ineffective service delivery
Loss of opportunities, credibility and integrity

MAJOR STRATEGIC ISSUES UNDERLYING THE


UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN STRATEGIC PLAN
1.Governance

and Management
2.Teaching and Learning
3.Research, Development and
Innovation
4.Human Resources
Development
5.Community Service and
Partnership
6.The Environment
71

MAJOR STRATEGIC ISSUES IN UNIVERSITY


OF IBADAN STRATEGIC PLAN (Contd.)

7. Staff and Student Welfare


8. Finance
9. Gender Mainstreaming
10. Programme Development
11. Internationalization
12. Quality Assurance

Friday, 25th September


2009

72

Handling of each Strategic


Issue
For each strategic issue, the following were
formulated:
i.Strategic goal
ii.Background
iii.Strategic Objectives
iv.Implementation Strategies

Sample Strategic Issue:


Finance

STRATEGIC GOAL:
To ensure an efficient, secure,
prompt, transparent, accountable
and sustainable financial
management system

Sample Strategic Issue:


Finance
BACKGROUND
An important strategy in maintaining high
standards of educational activities in UI is a
sustainable financial management system.
The volatility of the global oil market and
the rapid expansion of the higher education
sector in Nigeria make it unrealistic for UI
to continue to be over-dependent on the
federal government. It is, therefore,
imperative for the University to diversify its
financial base. Financial stability would be
further assured through a robust resource
planning and fiscal management strategy

Sample Strategic Issue:


STRATEGIC
OBJECTIVES
Finance

The Strategic Objectives of these goals are to:


1.Develop a mechanism to ensure that the
University has adequate resources to achieve its
vision, mission and objectives.
2.Improve efficiencies in management of
University finances strategically and prudently.
3.Develop and implement a risk management
and financial control framework for safeguarding
of assets and mitigation of risks.
4.Institute a mechanism for improved budgeting
for all activities of the University

Sample Strategic Issue:


IMPLEMENTATION
Finance STRATEGIES

The Implementation Strategies of these goals are:


Developing and implementing a long-term financial policy
that links financial resources to broad objectives and priorities
of UI Vision.
Instituting sound financial operational planning and resource
allocation frameworks that meets the identified goals of UI.
Developing appropriate investment strategies for growing
the Universitys financial and human capital aimed at
achieving its vision, mission and objective.
Strengthening the Endowment Fund and Advancement
Centre as sources of fund generation and investment returns.

Sample Strategic Issue:


IMPLEMENTATION
Finance STRATEGIES

Strengthening and enhancing fund generation from revenue


generating units (e.g. DLC, and similar centres) for improved
funds generation.
Instituting a capital planning mechanism that closely aligns
with academic priorities of the University.
Strengthening financial processes and controls in order to
eliminate waste and leakages and bureaucratic bottle-necks.
Developing and implementing policy of risk management
and financial control relating to University asset and cash
safeguard.
Instituting a mechanism for improved budgeting based on
increased knowledge of costing of teaching, research, learning
and administrative activities of the University

KEY INITIATIVES FOR ACHIEVING


STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES/FRAMEWORK
FOR
ACTION
For each
strategic objective of each of the 12 SIs, the
Matrix of the Framework of Action was developed with
the following elements:
1.Expected Results
2.Implementation Strategies
3.Activities
4.Objectively Verifiable Indicators
5.Means of Verification
6.Responsible Officers/Bodies
7.Assumptions
8.Estimated Cost
9.Time Frame

Sample Strategic Objective 1


of Finance
Objective 1 states as follows:
Develop a mechanism to ensure
that the University has adequate
resources to achieve its vision,
mission and objectives.

Expected

Results
A University with robust investments to
be less dependent on Federal
Government
Implementation Strategies
Developing appropriate investment
strategies for growing the Universitys
financial and human capital aimed at
achieving its vision, mission and
objective.

Activities

Activities

The Challenge

As you contemplate the journey towards


transforming to a world-class institution or a
Service-Intensive University, let us ponder these
words by Elder Felix Ohiwerei, former ProChancellor of the University of Ibadan:
The implementation of the Vision is however far
more important than its preparation. It calls for
fundamental changes in habits and attitude, the way
we work, the quality and content of our work; the
way we relate with one another as workers and the
way we relate with the students - the leaders of
tomorrow.what Ibadan is aiming at in the Vision
amounts to a cultural change. Certain existing values
and existing practices will have to be discarded, while
new ones will have to be imbibed: values and
practices which are consistent with a creative and
innovative institution of higher learning.
Felix Ohiwerei, Former Chairman of Council, UI

EXPERIENCE SHARING ON SP IMPLEMENTATION


Maintaining

the core values of the University:


UI Senate and the 16 graduating students in law
Worthy in character and learning the double
jeopardy case
Managing Change
Technology in administration
Promotion guidelines
Data Management System
Financial management
TETFund projects packaging
Staff Development
Budget Preparation/Envelope

IMPLEMENTATION OF A RESOURCE PLANNING MODEL (RPM)

The Enterprise Resource Planning Model (ERP)

It is all about Alignment of Factors that


make a WCU

UCI ELEIYELE HOSTEL (1948)

UCI ELEIYELE PRICINPALS OFFICE

UCI ELEIYELE STUDENTS HOSTEL

UCI ELEIYELE STUDENTS HOSTEL

Mellanby Hall

The Rehabilitated Mellanby Hall

New PG Hall
(Gen Abdusalam Abubakar)

UI International Conference Centre

Concluding Remarks
Implementing a culture change in a university is,
according to a commentator, like trying to relocate a
graveyard surely the inmates cannot help you.
Some have described universities as organised
anarchies with multiple, ambiguous, and conflicting
goals.
This institutional complexity of universities must
therefore be recognised by those who will be leading
the implementation of the Strategic Plan.
I daresay that it is a matter of collective choice as I
wish the University well.

THANK YOU