Anda di halaman 1dari 15

David Kolb

Experiential Learning Theory

Experiential Learning Theory


learning is the process whereby knowledge is
created through the transformation of
experience (Kolb, 1984, p. 38)
Integrating new information into existing
knowledge
Involving the whole person
Transacting between the person and the
environment

Kolb Learning Model


Stages & Styles
FOUR STAGE CYCLE

FOUR LEARNING STYLES

1. Concrete experience (CE)


Feeling
2. Reflective observation (RO)
Watching
3. Abstract conceptualization
(AC) Thinking
4. Active Experimentation
(AE) Doing

Diverging (CE/RO) Feel &


Watch
Assimilating (AC/RO) Think &
Watch
Converging (AC/AE) Think &
Do
Accommodating (CE/AE) Feel
& Do

Four Learning Stages

Concrete Experience
Doing or having an experience

Abstract Conceptualization
Concluding or learning from the
experience

Reflective Observation
Reviewing or reflecting on the
experience

Active Experimentation
Planning or trying out what
you have learned

Some Examples
Learning to ride a bicycle:
Reflective observation - Thinking about riding and
watching another person ride a bike.
Abstract conceptualization - Understanding the
theory and having a clear grasp of the biking
concept.
Concrete experience - Receiving practical tips and
techniques from a biking expert.
Active experimentation - Leaping on the bike and
have a go at it.

Learning a software program:


Active experimentation - Jumping in and doing it.
Reflective observation - Thinking about what you
just performed.
Abstract conceptualization - Reading the manual to
get a clearer grasp on what was performed.
Concrete experience - Using the help feature to get
some expert tips.

Learning to coach:
Concrete experience - Having a coach guide you in
coaching someone else.
Active experimentation - Using your people skills with
what you have learned to achieve your own coaching
style.
Reflective observation - Observing how other people
coach.
Abstract conceptualization - Reading articles to find
out the pros and cons of different methods.

Learning Style
Accommodating

Commit yourself to objectives


Seek new opportunities
Influence and lead others
Become personally involved
Deal with people

Converging
Create new ways of thinking and
doing
Experiment with new ideas
Choose the best solution
Set goals
Make decisions

Diverging

Tune in to peoples feelings


Be sensitive to values
Listen with an open mind
Gather information
Imagine the implications of
ambiguous decisions

Assimilating

Organize information
Test theories and ideas with
others
Build conceptual models
Design experiments
Analyze data

Four Learning Styles

Accommodator
Learns through concrete experience
Transforms learning into abstract
experimentation
Leaders, risk takers, needs a mentor, strength in
doing, likes examples
Teaches students by encouragement, modeling

Diverger
Learns through concrete experience
Transforms learning by reflective observation
Likes to brainstorm, solve problems,
imaginative, emotional, people person
Teaches through lectures and motivates students
to learn

Converger
Learns through abstract conceptualization
Transforms information through active
experimentation by doing
Prefers objects, dislikes group activities, likes
questioning, problem-solver, unemotional
Teaches by questioning and encouraging
students

Assimilator
Learn through abstract conceptualization
Transform learning through reflective
observation
Likes reading, research, organizing, working
alone, likes class calendar
Teaches students by lecturing, traditional
classroom

Kolbs Experiential Learning Cycle