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Development and

Properties of
Polycaprolactone/hy
droxyapatite
composite
biomaterials

Angga Septa Soetrisno


2712100063
Praditha Diksi Askara
2712100136

Introduction
Composites which consists of biodegradeable polymeric matrix
and bioactive ceramic fillers may find many applications in the
substitution of bone tissue and in many other orthopaedic
applications. Polymer/ceramic combinations can be used for
controlling
composite
biomaterials
properties,
such
as
biocompatibility, rate of degradability, and mechanical properties,
making the materials suitable for use in a wide range of biomedical
applications. However, poor adhesion between the polymeric matrix
and ceramic particles results in early failure at the interface and in a
too fast degradation of the composites mechanical properties. The
filler/matrix interface is a major determinant for the mechanical
behavior of composites.

Purpose of Paper
Obtain PCL/HA composites with enhanced
interfacial interaction between the polymer and
the filler using two different methods for
preparing the composites

Experimental
Convential Blending
Surface Modification of HA
particles

Conventional Blending
Drying Hidroxy
Apatite
( 2 days before
use)

Blending
Polycaprolactone
and Sintered
Hidroxy Apatite in
an extruder

Allowing The
blend to stay for
30 minutes

Surface Modification
This method consists of grafting of PCL on the surface of HA
particles. This is achieved by a ring opening polymerization of
caprolactone (CL) in the presence of HA, where the OH groups of
the HA act as intitiators

Drying
Hidroxyapatite
(2 days Before
Use)

Drying
Caprolactone
with Calcium
Hydride
Ring Opening
Polymerization
of Caprolactone

By this method, the polymer chains chemically bound ti the HA surface


and results more entanglements with the polymer chains of the matrix.

Analysis
TGA
Mechanical Properties
SEM
Degradation test

Thermogravimetric Analysis
TGA shows that the real HA content present on the
composites obtained after processing by both methods
was in the range of 10%, 20%, and 30% with an error of
2%.

Mechanical Properties
In both methods, the values of of E0.3% increased with
increasing amounts of filler and UTS values decrease
with increasing amounts of HA in both methods

Scanning Electron Microscope


SEM of Blending Material:
In the composites obtained by blending method a poor
interaction between polymer and filler visualized

SEM of Surface Modification


In composites obtained by Surface Modification Method
HA particles are covered with polymer, which is an
indication of a good filler/matrix interface.

Degradation Test
Grafted composites have less susceptibility for water-uptake
and degrade slower than the blended composites because of the
grafting of PCL on HA particles leads to a better matrix/filler
interface.
The degradation rate is growing faster for higher amounts of
water absorbed and for greater content of HA due to preferential
attack at the matrix/filler interface.

Conclusion
Composites obtained by both methods, an increase in
the modulus for higher amounts of filler is observed.
The modulus (E0.3%) of the materials in wet state is
lower than in the dry state. This difference is more
significant in blended composites than grafted
composites.
SEM images indicate grafted composite has better
matrix/filler interface than blended composite.