Anda di halaman 1dari 15

NOUN CLAUSE

Kelompok 5

By:
1. Anisatul Akhadiyyah (03)
2. Ervina Budi Rahayu (15)
3. Fatha Fajrian Budoyo(17)
4. Herinda Nur Annisa (20)
5. Raferika Khanza S (30)
6. Videlia Rosa Maharani (35)
XI MIA 1

WHAT IS A NOUN?

Definitions of Noun
The English word noun comes from the Latin
nomen meaning name. The function of noun
is to name someone or something.
According to Oxford Dictionary (Pearsall,
1999:945), noun is a word used to identify any
of a class of people, places or things, or to
name a particular one of these.
It can be concluded that noun is a word that
functions to identify someone or something.

WHAT IS A CLAUSE?

Definition of Clause
A clause is a group of related words. It contains a
subject and a verb (Betty, 1993:346).
Clause is a group of words that contains a subject
and a verb. it can take the place of different parts
of speech
It can be concluded that clause is a group of
words that contains a subject and a verb, which
can take the place of different of speech.

NOUN CLAUSE

Definition of Noun Clause


A noun clause is a dependent clause and cannot
stand alone as a sentence (Betty Schrampfer Azar,
1993:346).
In a noun clause, the full subject and predicate are
retained. The noun clause fills the same position and
serves the same function as noun (Frank,
1972:283).
So, it can be concluded that noun clause is a
dependent clause that has function as a subject,
object, or complement.


A noun clause is aclausethat plays the role of a
noun. For example (noun clauses shaded):
I likewhat I see.
I knowthat the tide is turning.
I've metthe man who won the lottery.
(Not all agree this is a noun clause. See Note
on the right.)

TYPES OF NOUN CLAUSES

Noun Clauses That Preceded by Question Words


Noun clauses that preceded by question words are
usually used to answer a question. The following
examples should better explain this.
Q:Where does Sarik Live?.
A: I don't know where Sarik lives. "Where Sarik lives"
is a noun clause. We can answer this question
without a noun clause by saying the following. I
don't know Sarik's address. The noun phrase, Sarik's
address, replaces with the noun clause, where Sarik
lives.

Noun Clauses That Preceded by Whether or If


Noun clauses that preceded by whether or if are
used to answer yes/no type questions. Whether
and if are usually interchangeable. The following
examples should better explain this.
Q:Does Judy own a Honda?
A: I don't know if Judy owns a Honda. "if Judy
owns a Honda" is a noun clause. We could answer
this question without a noun clause by saying the
following. I don't know the answer. In this case,
the noun phrase, the answer, replaces the noun
clause, if Judy owns a Honda.


Noun Clauses That Preceded by That
Noun clauses that preceded by that are used to
answer questions in which person who is answering
is thinking, giving an opinion, or using a mental
activity verb. The following examples should better
explain this.
Q: Do you know the location of an ATM?
I believe that there is an ATM in the supermarket.
"that there is an ATM in the supermarket" is a
noun clause. Most of the time, native speakers will
drop the word that

Syntactic Functions of Noun


Clause

As a subject
How he gets the money is his own affair.
Whether (or not) he gets the money doesnt concern me.
The two groups of italic words are the subject of the sentences
above.
As a subject after it
It is well known that coffee grows in Brazil.
The word that coffee grows in Brazil is a subject after It in
the above sentence.
As an object of verb
I know that coffee grows in Brazil.
I do not know how he will get the money.
The two groups of italic words are the object of verb of the
sentences above.

As an object of preposition
We were concerned about how he will get the money.
We talked about what a pretty girl she was.
The words that sign in italic word refer to the object of
preposition of the sentences above.
As a subjective complement
- The question is how he will get the money.
- My understanding is that coffee grows in Brazil.
The two groups of italic words are the subjective
compliment of the sentences above.
As an appositive
His belief that coffee grows in Brazil is correct.
The word that coffee grows in Brazil is an appositive in the
sentence above.

Compare the three examples above to these:


I likecakes.
I knowLondon.
I've metMadonna.
The words in bold are allnouns. This shows that shaded clauses in
the first three examples are functioning as nouns, making
themnoun clauses.
Like any noun, a noun clause can be asubject, anobject, or a
complement.
In asentence, a noun clause will be adependent clause. In other
words, a noun clause does not stand alone as a complete thought.

Examples of Noun Clauses


Here are some examples of noun clauses:

A person who trusts no onecan't be trusted. (Jerome Blattner)


(This noun clause is thesubjectof the sentence.)
(Not all agree this is a noun clause. See Note on the right.)
That he believes his own storyis remarkable. (Jerome Blattner)
(This noun clause is the subject of the sentence. Be aware that starting a
sentence with a noun clause startingThatis acceptable, but it grates on lots of
people's ears. As a result, many writers prefer to precede it with "The fact".)
Ask your childwhat he wants for dinneronly if he's buying. (Fran Lebowitz)
(This noun clause is thedirect objectofask.)
He knows all about art, but he doesn't knowwhat he likes. (James Thurber, 18941961)
(This noun clause is the direct object ofknow.)


It is even harder for the average ape to believethat he has descended
from man. (H L Mencken, 1880-1956)
(This noun clause is the direct object ofbelieve.)
I never know how much ofwhat I sayis true. (Bette Midler)
(This noun clause is anobject of a preposition .)
Man iswhat he eats. (Ludwig Feuerbach)
(This noun clause is asubject complement.)
My one regret in life isthat I am not someone else. (Woody Allen)
(This noun clause is a subject complement.)
An economist isa man who states the obvious in terms of the
incomprehensible. (Alfred A Knopf)
(This noun clause is a subject complement.)
(Not all agree this is a noun clause. See Note on the right.)


Thanks you