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Week 6

Chapter 14

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14.1
Functions of Several Variables

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Review Chapter 1 - Function

y = f (x) is a function of x if for every pair x in the Domain, D,


there is one and only one corresponding y value.

*Note that the domain is in 1 dimension and the function is in 2 dimensions.

Is a function. Is NOT a function. Because x


=1 will give y = 0, x = -1 will
also give y = 0

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z = f (x,y) is a function of two variables if for every pair (x,y) in
the Domain, D, there is one and only one corresponding z
value.

*Note that the domain is in 2 dimensions and the function is in 3 dimension.

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Graphing a two variable function using
Level curve and level contour

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SOLUTION
Domain : entire xy-plane
Range : must be less or equal to 100
Find the level curve at

The graph is the paraboloid z = 100 - x 2 - y2, the positive portion of which is
shown in Figure 14.5.

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Positive portion of the graph

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Graphing a three variable function

Note: We cannot graph a 4 dimensional graph, but we can evaluate its


domain which in 3 dimensions.

The function is a sphere that has an origin of (0, 0, 0)

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Computer Graphing

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Computer Graphing

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14.2
Limits and Continuity in
Higher Dimensions

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Review of Limits in Chapter 2

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Review of Limits in Chapter 2

Limit in 2 dimensions

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Limits in Higher Dimensions

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When

When

So to if the limit exist as (x,y) approaches (0,0), it must equal to 0.


To see if this is true, we apply the definition of limit.
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Definition

Note that;
, because
because

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You can choose and conclude that

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Continuity

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Limit exist as because we can directly substitute the value of (x,y) and get the limit.

But if we substitute ,0) into the function, we will get which is undefined.

So we have to prove the limit as approaches (0,0) from different direction is not
equal to each other.

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When

When

When

We proved that the limit as (x,y) approaches (0,0) does not equal from
different direction, therefore not exist.

This means that the function is not continuous at (0,0).

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The function is has no limit as (x,y) approaches (0,0) if the limit from a
different direction is not equal.

We take different (x,y) value to proof this.

When

This does not


necessarily
When
means limit exist
and equal to 0

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We take another value of (x,y)

When

We proved that the limit as (x,y) approaches (0,0) does not equal from
different direction, therefore not exist.

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Tutorial

Section 14.1
1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 39
Section 14.2

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 13, 14, 23, 24, 25, 30, 31,


34, 35, 37, 41, 42

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