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AN OVERVIEW:

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 2
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 2
concerned with Integrating Technology into
Teaching and Learning.
focused on introducing, reinforcing, supplementing
and extending the knowledge and skills to learners
so that they can become exemplary users of
educational technology.
will involve a deeper understanding of the
computer as well as hands-on application of
computer skills.
aims to infuse technology in the student-teachers
training, helping them to meet and adapt to rapid
and continuing technological changes, particularly
in the thriving global information and
communication technology (ICT) environment.
More specifically the course objective are:
To provide education in the use of
technology in instruction by
providing knowledge and skills on
technology integration-in-
instruction to learners;
To impart learning experiences in
instructional technology
supported instructional planning;
TO ACQUAINT STUDENTS ON
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
OR IT RELATED LEARNING
THEORIES WITH THE
COMPUTER AS A TUTOR
TO LEARN TO USE AND
EVALUATE COMPUTER
BASED EDUCATIONAL
RESOURCES;

To engage learners on practical


technology integration issues
including managing IT classrooms,
use of the Internet for learning,
cooperative learning through the
use of information technology; and
TO INCULCATE HIGHER
LEVEL THINKING AND
CREATIVITY AMONG
STUDENTS WHILE
PROVIDING THEM
KNOWLEDGE OF IT
RELATED LEARNING
THEORIES.
LESSON 3
UNDERSTANDING
TECHNOLOGY LEARNERS
Todays learner appears smarter,
yet they cant read as their
parents do and they are addicted
to the Internet . On the other
hand, it is to be admitted that
our teachers today generally use
the traditional education
program applicable to learners
of the past, acquainted with
linear, textual, and sequential
learning. They fail to realize
There are positive benefits derived from the
use of information technology or digital
resources and these counterbalance possible
negative effects of technology on children.
Daily expose to high technology-personal
computers, video game gadgets, cell phones,
Internet search sites-stimulates the brain by
strengthening and creating neural circuits.
A current technological revolution is creating
an intellectual revolution, faster and better
than before
The 19th century psychologist Jean Piaget
presented a chart from childhood to
adulthood with the first two years of
susceptible minds, six years of acquiring
communication skills, teenage years of
transition concrete thinking, and adult
years of abstract thinking and reasoning.
Given the digital age today, Piagets
traditional learning chart may have to be
redefined.
Even at a very early stage at preparatory
school, computer-aided instruction are
offered as digital tools. Digital technology
resources, such as Ipod music devices,
video game gadgets, mobile phones, and
the Internet contribute to their digital
acculturation. There is phenomenon of the
young generation taking on multi-tasking
as they perform task simultaneously;
watching video, chatting on line,
downloading pictures and music, surfing
the Web, etc. research shows that
multitasking can be detrimental since this
prevents concentration of specific task.
There is the need therefore to balance the
good and possibly detrimental changes
observed among new learners of this
information technology age.
LESSON 4

Bridging the Generation Gap


The older generation often feels there is
generation gap between them and the younger
generation. This is apparent in simple things like
the manner of dressing, socializing, more
intimate relationship like friendship and
marrying, etc. Still, some old thing are difficult
to overcome, as there are still the caste system in
India, pre-arranged marriages in China, female
circumcision in Africa, and theocratic or
religion-rule of societies in the Middle East.
Even in education, traditional schooling has
hardly changed even with the clear evidence of a
digital world.
In the field of education, a huge generation gap also
exists and it will continue
to widen unless some changes are adopted at the
proper time. In peasant third
world countries where schools dont have facilities, it
is understandable that the
transition to digital education may take time. But
given the rapid emergence of
digital technology, at times referred to as information
and communication
technology (ICT), there is the need to prepare for
bridging the digital gap in
society, First we need to understand the potentials of
ICT:
The new network of instantaneous communication is
global, overcoming boarders between countries and
continents.
Much of what elders believe may not be applicable
anymore to the new generation, especially along matters
of traditional value system.
Alvin Tofflers book, Future Shock, shows how the
information age has begun to create many cultural
changes in the family, societies, business, government
such as what he calls the throw-away society, modular
man, kinetic image, scientific trajectory, fractured family,
surfeit of sub cults, psychological dimension, etc.
Given the speed and power of ICT for
change, growth, innovation, it becomes
critical that teachers understand the gap that
may be perceived between them and the new
generation of learners.
As sophisticated technology advances at a
dizzying pace, the complacency of educators
to stick to traditional education systems and
approaches becomes futile, if not
retrogressive.
LESSON 5

Preferences of the
Technology Generation
What the old generation likes may not be
the same as what the new generations prefers
in their life, work and leisure..
post war ii gardening classes in which
students engaged in seedbed preparation,
planting and nurturing of vegetable plants in
wide school are no longer part of the school
program.. vocational cultural and values classes
have also been minimized due to emphasis of
basic English, Mathematics and Science.
SINGLE AND MULTI TRACK ACTIVITY
PATTERNS
The old generation has availed of slow and single track pattern of
activities. Life has been comfortably slower for oldies as they watch
and follow television tele-nobelas like Walang Hanggan patronize
the movie of the favorite local performers, and prioritize social
activities like community outings and dance clinics. On the other
hand the new generation exposed to quick flicking video dames,
mobile phone texting, socializing through the social Web sites, and
downloading text/music/photos/video with adeptness and task-
switching speed.
Linear versus hyper media
The past-30 year old generation has obtained
information in a linear, logical and sequential
manner.
The new generation, however, follows a
personal random access to hyper linked
information, less superior to elders in focus and
reflection.
Independent versus social
learners
The traditional education system
gives priority to independent learning,
prior to participative work. New
learners, however, are already
acquainted with digital tools that
adopt to both personal and
participative work.
Learning to do versus
Learning to pass the test
Old teachers teach students in order to help
them to pass the tests and complete the course
requirement. On the other hand, the new digital
learners simply wish to acquire skills, knowledge
and habits as windows of opportunity afford
them to learn.
Delayed rewards and instant
gratification
The traditional reward system in education
consists in the grades, honor
certificates/medals, and diplomas.
On the other hand digital learners on their own
experience more immediate gratification
through immediate scores from games,
enjoyable conversation from web cam calls,
excitement from email chats, and inviting
comments from their Facebook account.
Rote memory versus
Fun learning
Teachers feel obliged to delivering content-
based courses, the learning of which is
measurable by standard tests. Digital learners
prefer fun learning which is relevant and
instantaneously useful to them.
While there are apparent setbacks or
limitations to digital learning, there are
opportunities to tap through:
the new learners digital fluency with visual
learning with the use of audiovisuals, media
and multimedia;
Using hyperlinked multimedia for projects
that enhance work focus and reflection; and
Problem-solving activities to suit the new
generations style and preference for fun and
relevant learning.
LESSON 6
Developing Basic
Digital Skills
As teachers adjust their teaching to effectively
match the new digital world of information and
communication technology(ICT), they must be
clear on what basic knowledge, skills and values
( or literacies) need to be developed by digital
learners. These basic literacies will not replace
the 3 Rs ( reading, writing, and rithmetic ), but
they will not be complemented by six essential
skills to equip students for success in the
millennial world.
1.Solution fluency
This refers to the capacity and creativity in
problem solving. It requires whole brain
thinking executed when students define a
problem, design the appropriate solution, apply
the solution, and assess the process and result.
2. Information fluency
a.) An ability to access information, access may
involve not only of the internet, but other
sources like the CD-ROM software.
b.) An ability to retrieve information, retrieved
information may include not only texts, but
images, sound and video. The searches must be
perceptive of trends in the digital info scope in
the accuracy of data, and in the methodology
for data gathering.
c.) An ability to reflect on, assess and rewrite
for instructive information packages.
The above taxonomy is patterned after new
scientific knowledge on how the human brain
works. The right hemisphere of the brain works
sequentially through a series of event like talking,
reading, and writing. It is logical and good at
decoding along the literal level of meaning.
By developing higher thinking skills, the school
today can inculcate the digital fluencies, while
overcoming limitations inherent in digital
technology, resulting in superficial and mediocre
learning skills of new learners.