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A removable partial denture (RPD) acts as a

substitute for rather than a replacement of


missing teeth and oral tissues.
The resistance to displacement when it is
subjected to functional, horizontal and
rotational stresses.

Support is provided by the foundation (teeth


and soft tissue) on which the prosthesis rests.
RPD stability depends primarily on:

Overall quality of adaptation of the prosthesis


to the foundationboth horizontally and
verticallyas well as

The inherent mobility of the teeth and soft


tissue forming the foundation.
The resistance to displacement when it is
subjected to functional, horizontal and
rotational stresses.

Support is provided by the foundation (teeth


and soft tissue) on which the prosthesis rests.
Even the most well - adapted prosthesis
require attention to maintain comfort,
function, and esthetics due to continuing
residual ridge resorption.
Resorption is rapid in the first
6 months to 2 years
post-extraction of the
teeth and proceeds at a
slower pace until death.
Common findings for any given RPD patient may include:

Loss of intimate soft tissue contact with the prosthesis.

Loss of occlusal contacts.

Tissue damage (such as ulceration, inflammation, or


hypertrophy).

Altered relationship of the clasps on the abutment teeth,


leading to increased abutment tooth stress.

Fracture of RPD components.


By applying finger pressure to the distal
extension base and looking for lifting of the
anterior-most rest ( indirect retainer)
Retainer broken from a terminal abutments
by excessive rotational movement of a non-
stable distal extension
The loss of rests as vertical stops results in
the loss of occlusal contacts and settling of
RPD, leading to soft tissue entrapment and
trauma.
For reline to be successful the denture base must extend to cover
the available denture-bearing area.

Under extended borders leads to trauma


Proper extended denture enhance retention, support, stability.
Under extended borders leads to trauma
Proper extended denture enhance retention, support, stability.
The impression material cannot be expected to extend beyond
the support of the denture base.

If denture is short of ideal coverage, a rebase should be used


instead of a reline.
The resin should be removed for two important reasons.
First,
Space must be created so the impression material will not apply
undue pressure to the underlying soft tissues.

Second,
The surface of the existing resin must be removed to eliminate
potential contaminants and ensure a suitable bonding surface.
Closed-mouth and

Open-mouth impression method

Depends:
On the resiliency of the mucosa covering
the residual ridge.
If mucosa is easily displaced, the open-
mouth selective pressure technique is
preferable.
Tissue changes that occur beneath tooth-supported denture
bases do not affect the support of the denture; therefore
relining or rebasing is usually done for reasons that include:
(1) Unhygienic conditions and the trapping of debris

(2) An unsightly condition that results from the space that has
developed

(3) Patient discomfort associated with lack of tissue contact that


arises from open spaces between the denture base and the
tissue.
Closed-mouth impression method with virtually any
impression material.
METAL

ACRYLIC
1. Direct and

2. Indirect reline procedures


A uniform amount of denture resin from the intaglio
of the denture base needs to be removed
Its also called Chair side Reline.
Its also called Laboratory Reline.
The choice of impression material depends:

Mobile tissue on the crest of the ridge:


Use a free-flowing, Zinc Oxide-eugenol impression material.

Dense, Firm Tissues.


Polysulfide rubber bases,

Polyether,

PolyVinylSiloxanes, and

Mouth-temperature Waxes
The most critical step in the reline procedure is the
maintenance of the tooth-framework relationship during the
set of the impression material. Under no circumstances should
the patient be allowed to bring the
teeth into contact during the impression-making procedure.
Rather, the dentist must hold the framework
against the abutments until the impression material is
to be removed from the mouth. In this way, soft tissue
support will be in harmony with the tooth-framework
relationship. This is the only way to ensure routine
success of reline procedures.
Rebasing procedures are used to replace most, if not all, of a
denture base.

Rebasing is indicated when the denture bases do not extend to


cover all of the denture-bearing tissues.

It is also used when a denture base has fractured or has become


irreparably discolored.
The denture resin is relieved and shortened to
allow room for readaptation of the borders with mod-
eling plastic. The modeling plastic is added in small in-
crements and extended to cover the entire denture-
bearing area (Fig 17-7). When the border molding is
complete, the base is covered with a suitable impres-
sion material and the final impression made. During
this procedure, the practitioner must ensure that the
framework is properly related to the teeth.
Occlusion on a relined removable partial
denture may be reestablished by several
methods, depending on whether the relining
results in an increase in the vertical
dimension of occlusion or in lack of
opposing occlusal contacts. In either
instance, it is usually necessary to make
a remounting cast for the relined removable
partial denture so the denture can be
correctly related to an opposing cast or
prosthesis in an articulator ( Figure 21-4 ).