Anda di halaman 1dari 28

HUGOTON GAS FIELD, KANSAS, USA

OVERVIEW

• Hugoton Gas Field is a large natural gas field in


the U.S. states of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.
• Hugoton has an estimated ultimate recovery
of 1.5 tcm (53 tcf), of which some 65 percent
has been produced. More than 10,000 wells
have been drilled in this extensive field, which
produces from a series of
Permian limestones and dolomites.
• The gas accumulations are stratigraphically
controlled by variations in lithology. The
productive area extends along a 400-km (250-
mile) trend.
HISTORY

• Natural gas in the Hugoton area was first discovered in 1922 in the Boles #1 well, in Seward
County, two miles west of Liberal.
• The well was drilled in 1919 to a depth of 2,919 feet by the Defenders Petroleum and
Traders Oil and Gas Company, but was shut in for three years because it did not find oil.
• In 1922 the well was completed as a gas well, but there was little demand for natural gas in
the area and it was years before another gas well was drilled in the field.
• In 1927, gas was discovered at the Independent Oil and Gas Company's Crawford No. 1,
about 2,600 feet (790 meters) below the surface southwest of Hugoton, Kansas, in Stevens
County. This is now considered the center of the Hugoton Field.
• By the end of 1928, five wells had been drilled in the field and the first pipeline was
transporting gas to local markets.
HISTORY

• From 1970 to 1982, development of the deeper


Council Grove gas proceeded steadily with about
2,000 wells being drilled. Since authorization was
received for in-fill drilling in 1986, the industry has
completed more than 2,760 new wells.
• In 2007, the Hugoton gas area produced 358
billion cubic feet of gas, making it the 5th largest
source of natural gas in the United States.
HISTORY

• Based on the model, researchers estimate 65% of the gas may have been removed from
the field since its discovery in 1922. That's 35 trillion cubic feet of gas from about 12,000
wells in both states. In the 1960s the field regularly produced 600 billion cubic feet
annually. After years of steady decline, however, the Hugoton produced less than half
that--just over 250 billion cubic feet--in 2006.
• Most of the remaining natural gas is in less permeable rock layers where the gas moves
more slowly and can be more difficult to produce
GEOLOGY

• The Hugoton Field is a stratigraphic trap overlying a monocline, with the


primary pay found in the Krider dolomite of Permian age.
• This dolomite and the overlying Herington dolomite make up the
Wolfcampian carbonates. Above these carbonates is the Wichita,
an anhydrite and dense dolomite forming the reservoir seal, which thins
to the west.
• Marine carbonates were being deposited from the Late
Pennsylvanian until Early Permian when the western portion of the area
was uplifted which resulted in erosion and the deposition of red clays
and sands, the future red beds consisting of shales and sandstones.
• Marine carbonate deposition followed, resulting in the interfingering of
the red beds and carbonates, the basis of the stratigraphic trap and a
tilted gas-water contact
HELIUM PRESENT IN
THE GAS
• The natural gas in the Hugoton field of Kansas and
Oklahoma, plus the Panhandle Field of Texas, contains
unusually high concentrations of helium, from 0.3% to 1.9%.
and it represents about 75 percent of all domestic helium
production.
• Because of the large size of these fields, they contain the
largest reserves of helium in the United States. Helium is
separated out as a byproduct from natural gas, from these
fields. Much of the recovered helium is piped to the National
Helium Reserve in Amarillo, Texas, where it is stored
underground in geologic formations for future use
• Throughout the 20th Century, the Hugoton field was the
source of most of the world's helium production.
FIELD DEVELOPMENT

• Most of the field's gas-gathering systems and gas-processing plants were constructed
concurrent with field development. The Amoco-operated Ulysses gasoline plant is a lean-
oil facility built in 1948. The plant was designed to recover and dehydrate a limited NGL
product consisting of 30% of the C3 and most of the C4 and C5.
• The Warren-operated Jayhawk plant was built in 1962 by Cities Services Gas Co. The
plant was built with nitrogen rejection and helium-recovery capabilities and, as such, was
able to reprocess Ulysses' residue gas for recovery of the remaining C3+ NGL stream
and the helium.
FIELD DEVELOPMENT - AMOCO

• Amoco had made several attempts in the past to gain control of its proprietary
processing rights which would allow it to construct a new state-of-the-art cryogenic gas-
processing plant to replace the older facilities. Amoco reached agreement with Williams
Natural Gas Co. and Trident NGL Inc. wherein Amoco would construct, operate, and
control the replacement facilities.
• In replacing both plants, the Hugoton Jayhawk gas-processing plant eliminates double-
plant operating costs and the relatively high ongoing maintenance and repair expense. The
reduction of processing costs coupled with margins earned from deep C2 recovery were
sufficient to justify the capital investment to construct new facilities.
HUGOTON JAYHAWK

• The plant's 450-MMcfd design processing capacity will accommodate substantially all of
Amoco's proprietary production and an ever-increasing share of third-party production
as proprietary volumes decline over time.
• The plant is positioned to be a regional processing hub, not only for Hugoton gas, but for
gas produced in Oklahoma, Colorado, and the Texas Panhandle.
• Hugoton Jayhawk is designed to recover more than 80% of the C2 and essentially all of
the C3+ components in a Y-grade NGL product stream of approximately 31,000 b/d
Hugoton area gas contains about 0.4% helium, of which up to an estimated 98% is
recovered in a product stream of approximately 700 MMscf/yr.
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
&
EVALUATION
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
SIMULATION AND ENGINEERING STUDIES
OGIP STATIC MODEL
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
SIMULATION AND ENGINEERING STUDIES
OGIP STATIC MODEL
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
KANSAS HUGOTON INFILL- DRILLING PROGRAM

• McCoy et al., (1987) work focused on pressure, deliverability and rate vs time relationship between
two wells on a 640 acre section wrt any GIP additions that may be found by the second well.
• A five replacement well test program was conducted to determine if the increased reserves and
improved deliverability could be obtained by drilling an additional well on each of the five 640 acre
spacing units.
• McCoy et al, also examined performance data of the first 659 infill wells placed on production in the
Kansas Hugoton gas field.
• The decision to add an additional well was based on allowing the new constructed infill wells would
recover 3.5 to 5.0 Tscf of gas that could not be recovered with existing wells.
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
KANSAS HUGOTON INFILL- DRILLING PROGRAM
FIVE REPLACEMENT WELL HEAD STUDY
• Five replacement well heads were drilled and completed to determine the performance
of the replacement wells in relation to original wells (wrt increased deliverability and
reserves would be achieved).
• One unique aspect of the replacement well study showed that the original wells were
shut in for > 10 yrs and monthly wellhead shut-in pressures were reported.
• The initial well head shut-in pressure for the replacement wells averaged 14.4 psi higher
than the original wells (72hr shut-in pressure at that time).
• The 72hr deliverability for the replacement wells averaged 753 MScf/D. Higher than
original wells.
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION
KANSAS HUGOTON INFILL- DRILLING PROGRAM
FIVE REPLACEMENT WELL HEAD STUDY

• History of the Gano No1, original well.


• Was initially drilled in 1951, and completed open hole with a slotted liner.
• The entire open hole interval was acidized
• Initial well-head shut-in pressure was 434psia with an AOFP of 33,000 Mscf/D.
• In 1970, well was restimulated with 150,000lbm of sand and 150,000 gals of water resulting in
a four-fold increase in productivity.
• The well as shut in as an observation well in 1977, the cumulative production was ≈ 6 Bscf
RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
& EVALUATION KANSAS
HUGOTON INFILL-
DRILLING PROGRAM
FIVE REPLACEMENT WELL
HEAD STUDY
RESERVOIR
EVALUATION
DATA ANALYSIS FOR
IN-FILL DRILLING
ACTIVITY.

65MSCF/D
380 MSCF/D
RESERVOIR
EVALUATION
DATA ANALYSIS FOR
IN-FILL DRILLING
ACTIVITY

The ratio of the Corrected AOFP for


corrected infill to the infill well
original well = 0.64 1,715Mscf/D < the
Infill well not effective corrected original
cf original well well
RESERVOIR EVALUATION KANSAS HUGOTON:
EFFECT OF LAYERING ON DEPLETION AND
ABANDONMENT
VIABILITY OF HUGOTON GAS FIELD TO 2050

• This gas field has been in decline for the past 10 years, but recent geological survey by the
University of Kansas indicates that gas still in place could be extended thorough 2050.
• Provided that the integrity of 40 – 70 year old wells are maintained.
• Production projected to 2050 in the 28 model wells "suggests that most of the additional
gas recovered (21.3 Bcf) is primarily from zones having lower permeability," the average
well production estimated to be 21 Mcf/d/well and a decline rate of less than 2%.
REFERENCES

• http://www.kgs.ku.edu/PRS/publication/2003/ofr2003-29/P1-03.html
• Fetkovitch, M. J., D. J. Ebbs, Jr., and J. J.Voelker, 1994, Multiwell, multilayer model to evaluate
infill-drilling potential in the Oklahoma Hugoton field: Society of Petroleum Engineers, 65th
Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition, New Orleans, Paper SPE 20778, p. 162-168.
• Oberst, R. J., P. P. Bansal, and M. F. Cohen, 1994, 3-D reservoir simulation results of a 25-square
mile study area in Kansas Hugoton gas field: Society of Petroleum Engineers, Mid-Continent
Gas Symposium, Amarillo, TX, Paper SPE 27931, p. 137-147.
• Olson, T. M., J. A. Babcock, K.V. K. Prasad, S. D. Boughton, P. D. Wagner, M. K. Franklin, and K. A.
Thompson, 1997, Reservoir characterization of the giant Hugoton Gas Field, Kansas: American
Association of Petroleum Geologists, Bulletin, v. 81, p. 1785-1803.
• McCoy T.F et al, 1992. Analysis of Kansas Hugoton In-fill Drilling Program.SPE pages1-10.