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CREATING FLOW

THROUGH VALUE
STREAMS
Your overview for

Creating Flow Through


Value Streams

Based on Learning to See by Mike Rother & John Shook


Published by the Lean Enterprise Institute, 1998; available at www.lean.org
Production Excellence

The aim of Production Excellence is:


An approach to seeing waste, removing waste
and sustaining improvements in the production
processes and associated activities
Learning Framework

1. Introduction to Lean
2. The Current State Map
 Exercise 1: Your Current State
1. The Lean Value Stream
2. The Future State Map
 Exercise 2: Your Future State
1. Implementing the Future State
2. Conclusion
Value Stream Mapping Workshop
Objectives:
1. Teach the language of Lean.
2. Introduce Value Stream Mapping in a practical, hands-on
manner.
3. Understand what really makes a Value Stream ‘Lean’.
4. Develop your ability to design future state Value Streams.
5. Develop a successful implementation plan that gets it
done!
Introduction to Lean
Current State
The Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

Introduction to Lean
Getting Started

What is Lean?
Where did it come from?
What is Value?
Who defines Value?
Types of Activities

Incidental
Work
Pure
Waste

Value
The Flow of Value -
Value Stream Mapping
“A new pair of Lean glasses”
Value Stream Mapping

Enables everyone to see the waste simply and


easily.
Provides a system-level view.
Snapshot from the customer’s perspective.
Identifies the current operating philosophy.
Provides a roadmap for change that yields bottom
line results.
Value Stream Improvement &
Process Improvement

Process A Process B Process C

Raw Finished
Material Product Customer

Value Stream:

Learning to See, Mike Rother & John Shook, Lean Enterprise Institute, 1998
Sample Current State Map
Forecast
Productio Forecast
Supplier Weekly n Control Customer
Order Weekly
Order

Weekly
Schedule

Daily Weekly

Cut Weld Pack Ship


I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1
7 days 400 450 250
PT = 120 s PT = 55 s PT = 70 s
CT = 120 s CT = 55 s CT = 70 s
UT = 100% UT = 100% UT = 85%
CO = 0 CO = 10 m CO = 10 m
Using the Value Stream Mapping Tool

Implementation
Plan

Future State
Map

Current State
Map

Product
Family
Definition
Identify Product Families
. . . based on similar “downstream” or dedicated processing steps
Process Steps & Equipment

Injection Mold

Configure
Assembly

Assembly

Assembly
Electrical
Welding

& Test
Stamp

Mech.

Final
Sensor Activated Arm X X X X X X X

Laser Activated Arm X X X X X X X


Products

Manual Activated Arm X X X X X X X

Radon Detector X X X

XS2 Servo Motor X X X

XS4 Servo Motor X X X X


Levels of a Value Stream

Process Level Balance Charting and “cell” design

Single Plant
This Class
(door to door)

Multiple Plants Macro Mapping

Across Companies Global Mapping


Section 1 Quiz – True or False
1. A Value Stream Map shows the people flow, material flow and
information flow in a value stream.

2. A Value Stream is defined as all the Value Added activities


required to bring a product from raw material to the customer.

3. Determining Process Families is the step most companies tend to


skip when using Value Stream Mapping.

4. You should always start mapping at an individual process level,


and work your way up.
Introduction to Lean
Current State
The Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

Current State
Current State Map

Product
Family Current Future State Implementation
Definitio State Map Map Plan
n

Understanding how the shop floor currently operates


Draw both the material & information flows.
Follow a “control part” from receiving dock to shipping dock.
Walk the flow to get actual data by observing:
 Do not use engineering or standard times
 Always use a pencil
EMC Supply Case Study
The following pages contain case study information on EMC Supply.

Becoming proficient with mapping Value Streams requires practice –


draw the EMC current state value stream map along with the
instructor.

Be sure to ask questions, or let the instructor know if things are


moving too fast.
EMC Supply Co.
Current State Data Set
EMC Supply Co. Data Set
The Electro-Motion Control (EMC) Supply Company builds products for the motion control and
electronics industries. This case concerns one product family consisting of the following products:
Sensor-Activated Arms, Laser-Activated Arms and Manually-Activated Arms. These components are sent
to the ABC Industrial Supply (the customer).

Customer Requirements: EMC Working Time:


6,000 pieces per month
20 working days per month
 2,600 “sensor-activated arms” per month
 2,050 “laser-activated arms” per month Two shift operation in all production
 1,350 “manually-activated arms” per departments
month
Employees are paid for eight hours
ABC Industrial Supply operates on two shifts every shift
Shipping requirements: Palletized cartons with 10
arms per carton and up to 10 cartons per pallet. The Two 15-minute breaks during each
customer orders in multiples of cases. shift
Shipments are made daily to the distribution facility Manual processes stop during breaks
by truck
Unpaid 30-minute lunch
EMC Supply Co.
Current State Data Set

EMC Production Processes

At EMC, the processes for this product family involves:

 Injection Molding
 Mechanical Assembly
 Electrical Assembly
 Final Assembly
 Configure & Test.

Additionally, a bracket is Stamped, moved to a Welding operation, then onto Mechanical


Assembly to be attached to the housing. The finished products are then staged and
shipped to the distribution center on a daily basis.

100 ft steel coils are supplied by Stanley Steel Co. Deliveries are made to EMC once per
week.

500 lb. containers of plastic are supplied by Aspen Plastics, and are delivered twice per
month.
EMC Supply Co.
Current State Data Set

EMC Production Control Department:

Receives ABC Industrial Supply’s 6-week forecast via MRP.


Issues a 6-week forecast to Stanley Steel via MRP.
Issues a 12-week forecast to Aspen Plastics via MRP.
Secures coil steel via weekly fax order to Stanley Steel Co.
Secures plastic containers by monthly faxed order release to Aspen Plastics.
Receives daily firm faxed order from ABC Industrial Supply.
Generates MRP based weekly departmental schedules based upon customer
orders, WIP inventory levels, F/G inventory levels, and anticipated scrap and
downtime.
Issues weekly build schedules to Molding, Stamping, Welding, and Mechanical,
Electrical, Final Assembly, and Testing processes
Issues daily shipping list to Shipping Department.
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

Hmmm . . . here we go. ABC


Shipping Dept. Distribution gets daily
shipments from us – Production
Control gives us the daily ship
list. We ship once per day.

Some of the pallets are over


there. You can see that Arm
Assemblies get packed into
cartons that hold 10 each; 10
of those cartons go on each
pallet.

That’s all I have time to look


up for you now – it’s our
morning break.
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

I perform a diagnostic test on


the Arm Assemblies. It takes
me about 150 seconds to do
each.
I
720
How do I know what to do Sensor
next? I get a weekly schedule
from Production Control (like
everyone else), and I just I I
464 285
make sure I have all that done Laser Manual
by the end of the week.

Changeover? None; the test Configure & Test Workstation


fixture is universal.

Uptime? It’ s pretty good;


about 95%
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

I work on the Sensor-


Activated, the Laser-
Activated, and the
Manual ones too. They I
460
all take the same time, Sensor
about 135 seconds for
each.
No changeover, and the I I
bench is always available 325 270
Laser Manual
for work.

Final Assembly Workstation


EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

All I work on are the Sensor-


Activated, the Laser-
Activated, and the Manual
Arms. It doesn’t matter I
which one I work on, they all 380
take about 210 seconds for Sensor
each.
No changeover, and the
bench is always available for I I
265 140
work. Laser Manual

Electrical Assembly Workstation


EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

I start the Assembly


process for the Sensor-
Activated, the Laser-
Activated, and the Manual
I
Arms. It takes the same 460
time, about 165 seconds Sensor
for each. I need both
brackets from Stamping,
and the housings from I I
255 235
that injection Molding Laser Manual
machine. No changeover,
and the bench is always
available for work. Mechanical Assembly Workstation
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream
Of course I make the housings for
those arm assemblies; I also make
100 T Injection Mold a few others – you can see some of
my finished housings right there.
They go to Mechanical assembly
when I’m done.

They’re easy to mold – they only


take 30 seconds per piece after a 1
hour setup.

The molder? It’s a pretty good


machine, maybe it’s down about
20% of the time.

I I I
760 530 420
Sensor Laser Manual
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream
I’m dedicated to making
brackets, for those Arm
Assemblies and can make
one about every 60 seconds. Welding Workstation

My job’s a little tougher


than that of the assemblers.
Takes me 5 minutes to make
a fixture change, and my I
welder shuts down a lot – its 350
Sensor
uptime is about 85%.

Every once in awhile I leave


I
some work for 2nd shift, but 275
they have a lot to do in their Laser
own 8 hours, so I avoid it
when I can.
I
160
My parts are needed in Manual
Mechanical Assembly.
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream

I make the brackets for those arm


150 T Stamping Press
assemblies; I also make quite a
few other parts – There are some
finished brackets right there.
They go over to Mechanical
Assembly next.

The press cycles at 1 second –


setups take about 45-minutes.

The Press is fairly reliable; only


down about 10% of the time.

I I I
260 200 170
Sensor Laser Manual
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream
That’s the steel coil that we
turn into brackets at
Stamping– got 7 days on hand
right now. Comes to us from Receiving Dock
Stanley Steel Company, and we
get deliveries from them once
a week.

Over there are the 500 lb.


containers of plastic for
Injection Molding of the
housings-right now we have
about 12 days worth. That
comes in from Aspen Plastics
twice per month.
EMC Current State Map
Walking the Value Stream
Supplier Questions? Okay….I
guess.. Steel coil from Stanley
Steel? We place orders for that
weekly via e-mail.

They get some planning notice


from us as well, through a six-
week forecast that we issue
directly through MRP.

Plastic containers are ordered


from Aspen Plastics by a monthly
Production Control fax release.

We also provide them with a 12-


week forecast electronically via
MRP.
Section 2 Quiz – True or False

1. The best way to Value Stream Map is in a conference room


using system data.
2. Value Stream Mapping always starts with the customer.
3. The Lead-Time Ladder depicts the ratio of Value-Added time to
Non-Value Added time.
How Would You Map….
1. Multiple parts competing for a shared resource like heat treat or inspection?
2. Multiple machines of the same function?
3. Parts inside the heat treat oven?
4. Rework Processes?
5. Rework loops?
Team Tips –
Your Current State Map
Everyone draws - practice is essential!
Calculate the rate of customer demand.
Be sure to draw both material and information flows.
Introduce yourself to operators and explain your task.
Combine individual efforts into one team drawing.
Remember to include the Lead-Time Ladder at the bottom.
Make an overhead transparency.
The whole team will present to the class (10 minutes).
Briefly walk the class through the flow, and highlight problems and
opportunities that were identified.
Introduction to Lean
Current State
The Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

The Lean Value Stream


EMC Current State
12-wk
Forecast Production 6-wk
Aspen Control ABC Industrial
Foreca
Plastics Monthly
st Supply
Fax 6-wk MR Daily
Forecas Firm 6,000
P
t Order pcs/mo
2x
Stanley Wkly Weekly 2,600
Month
Fax Schedule Sensor
Steel
Daily Ship 2,050
Schedule Laser
1x
Week 1,350
Manual
Stamping Welding 2 Shifts
I I I
10
7 Days 260 “S” 350 “S” 1x
C/T=1s
Arms/Ctn.
(Coils) 200 “L” C/T=60s 275 “L” Daily
C/O=45 170 “M” C/O=5mi 160 “M” 10
min n
7d Ctns./Pallet
UP = 2.1d UP = 2.6d
90% 85%
1s 60 s
Mechanical Electrical Final Testing Shipping
Molding
I I I I I I
12 Days 760 “S” 460 “S” 380 “S” 460 “S” 720 “S”
(Containers) C/T=16 255 “L” C/T=21 265 “L” C/T=13 325 “L” C/T=15 464 “L”
C/T=30s 530 “L” 5s 0s 5s 0s
C/O=60 420 “M” 235 “M” 140 “M” 270 “M” 285 “M”
C/O= 0 C/O= 0 C/O= 0 C/O= 0
min
UP UP UP UP = 25.9 days L/T S
UP = =100% =100% =100% 95%
80% 5.7d 31.9 days L/TM
12d 3.2d 2.6d 3.5d 4.9d
30 s 165 s 210 s 135 s 150 s 690 sec P/TM
721 sec P/T S
Improving EMC

How should we improve EMC’s current state?


Where is our greatest opportunity for improvement?
Which process should we target first?
What departments will we need for Brainstorming
sessions?
Lean Guidelines
Takt time
Finish goods strategy
Continuous flow
FIFO
Pull
Schedule only one point
Interval
Pitch

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
How fast should we produce?

Point Efficiency
vs.
System
Efficiency
Takt Time

Customer demand rate


Used to synchronize the pace of
production and customer demand

Effective working time per time period


Takt time =
Customer demand per time period
450 minutes
= =3
150 pieces minutes
Finished Goods Strategy

Build to shipping . . . Build to a supermarket . . .

Customer Customer

Assembly Shipping Assembly Shipping

supermarket

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Continuous Flow Processing

Batch processing – one minute per piece

A B C

Continuous flow – make one move one

A B C

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
How do we connect separate processes?

Molding Assembly Shipping

Customer
How do I How do I How do I
know what know what know what
to work on to work on to work on
next? next? next?
FIFO – First In First Out
FIFO is a form of flow
FIFO is similar to ping pong balls going through a pipe. They
always come out in the same order, and the pipe is only so big.
Once you fill it, that’s it.

Process A Process B

FIFO
Supermarket Pull System

Customer goes to supermarket and gets what they need when they
need it
Supplier produces to replenish what was withdrawn

production withdrawal
kanban kanban

Supplying A Customer
Process B Process
new C withdrawn
product D product

supermarket
Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Try to Schedule Only One Point

customer

1 2 3 4
supermarket

customer
pull

1 2 FIFO 3 FIFO 4

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Establishing an interval

Weekly
Product
Demand

A Plastic Arm 1000

B Steel Arm 600

C Aluminum Arm 300

D Titanium Arm 100

Production capability - 400 per day


Establishing an interval

Product Description Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri


A Plastic Arm 400 400 200
B Steel Arm 200 400
C Aluminum Arm 300
D Titanium Arm 100
Total: 400 400 400 400 400

Interval = ?
Establishing an interval

Product Description Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri


A Plastic Arm 200 200 200 200 200
B Steel Arm 120 120 120 120 120
C Aluminum Arm 60 60 60 60 60
D Titanium Arm 20 20 20 20 20
Total: 400 400 400 400 400

Interval = ?
What if there are problems?

. . . if a machine breaks down?


. . . if defective parts are made?
. . . if we are rowing too fast, or not fast enough?
Visual Management Time Frame

How much work do we schedule & take away at the single point of scheduling?
This amount is our management time frame – how quickly we identify & can
react to problems.
How are we doing in terms of meeting Customer demand.

1 week

1 day

1 shift

1 hour

1 takt

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Load Leveling Box

1st Shift 7:00 a.m 7:30 a.m 8:00 a.m. 8:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

2nd Shift 3:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m.

B
...
C

Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Section 3 Quiz – True or False

1. Takt Time is the Customer Demand Rate.


2. Continuous flow is the best way to perform work, because it
moves people closer.
3. FIFO is a form of flow.
4. Pitch provides a “management time frame.”
Future State Questions
Product
Family Current Future State Implementation
Definitio State Map Map Plan
n

1. What is our Takt time?


2. What is our Finished Goods strategy for this Value Stream?
3. Where can we implement continuous flow?
4. Where can we implement FIFO?
5. Where do we have to use supermarket pull systems?
6. At what single point in the Value Stream do we initiate production?
7. What interval can we support at the pacemaker?
8. What is our management time frame at the pacemaker?
9. What process improvements will be necessary? (e.g. uptime,
changeover, training)
Introduction to Lean
Current State
The Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

Future State
Future State Icons

Material Flow Information Flow

shared rework withdrawal production


resource process kanban kanban

multiple kanban arriving signal


3 supermarket In batches kanban
machines

FIFO OXOX load kanban post


FIFO pull
lane leveling box
max 50 pcs.

pitch manual
information flow electronic
Delivery of FG to information flow
General kaizen
customer uptime lightning
burst
Learning to See Mike Rother John Shook Lean Enterprise Institute 1998
Section 4 Quiz – True or False

1. Pitch is always calculated by multiplying Takt time by a pack


quantity.
2. A Pacemaker should be located closest to the customer in order
to respond quickly.
3. A schedule must be issued when a shared resource is
encountered and continuous flow is not possible.
4. EPEI stands for Every Part, Every Interval.
Future State Mapping
1. Use the future state questions
2. Begin by drawing on your current state map
3. Then draw a fresh future state
4. Go to the shop floor if information is needed
5. Make two overhead transparencies
 One showing the answers to the 9 questions
 One showing your Future State Map
1. Present your transparencies (10 minutes)
2. Cover your answers to the 9 future state questions in your
debrief
Introduction to Lean
Current State
Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

Implementing the
Future State
A Plan To Get There
Product
Family Current Future State Implementation
Definitio State Map Map Plan
n

The future state implementation plan must support


organizational business objectives
Break down the future state into “loops”
Create measurable goals for your value stream plan
Relate the future state map to your layout
The value stream manager should conduct regular progress
reviews with the senior person on-site
Value Stream Managers

Supplier Customer

Provide cross-departmental focus on the system


Responsible for implementing the future state
Usually report to top manager onsite
12-wk
Forecast Production 6-wk
Aspen Control Foreca ABC Industrial
Plastics Daily Fax
st Supply
6-wk Daily
MRP
Forecas Firm
6,000 pcs/mo
t Order
3x Week Stanley Daily Takt=180 sec 2,600 Sensor
Steel Fax 2,050 Laser
Daily Ship 1,350
Schedule Manual
1 x Daily 60
Pitch=30 min. 2 Shifts
Stamping
SLM,SLM,… 10
Stamp
C/O 60 XOXO Arms/Carton.
C/T=1s
1.5 Days
2 Days Stamp 1 x Daily10
(Coils) C/O=45mi Uptime Cartons./Pallet
n
1.5 days 2 days
UP = 90% 60
1 sec Shipping
Weld, Assembly
30
& Test Cell
Molding 30
60
Mold Weld 2 Days Cartons
C/O 2 Days Takt = 180 sec C/O
3 Days C/T=30s Weld P C/T= 170 sec
(Containers) Uptime Work
C/O=60mi Mold P/T = 660 sec.
n Balancing
Uptime 5.5 days L/T S
Op = 4
3 days UP = 80% 2 days 2 days 7 days L/T M
30 sec 660 sec 690 sec P/T M
661 sec P/T S
Implementation Plan
Implementation Plan – EMC Stamping

Value Stream – Steering Brackets

Value Stream Manager – Mary Brown

Bus. Objective VS Objective Goal Respon Wk 1 Wk 2 Wk 3 Wk 4 Wk 5 Status

Value Stream Loop #1 - Pacemaker

Reduce value stream Improve welder uptime UP > 90% Larry Complete
inventory and customer
lead times
Reduce welder C/O < 1 min Mary On time
changeover

Achieve one piece flow Zero WIP Mary Behind

Establish FG Two days FG; no Peter


supermarket schedule

Run at pitch Load leveling box used to Peter


schedule

Value Stream Loop #2 – Molding Loop

Reduce post-Molding Establish . . .


WIP
Conducting Value Stream Reviews
Review progress at least at a two week “pitch”
Value Stream Manager reviews with senior person
on-site
Conduct the review by walking the flow with the
value stream plan
Focus on those items not yet completed
Senior person enables change and provides
assistance with harder items
Value Stream Manager’s Tools

5S TPM

Quick- Mistake Standard


Changeover Proofing Work

Market Process
Feedback Certification
Value Stream Manager’s Tools

Pareto Affinity
Analysis Diagrams

Problem
Solving

Fishbone PDCA
Diagram
Section 5 Quiz – True or False

1. Value Stream reviews should occur at quarterly meetings, in a


conference room.
2. A Value Stream Manager has responsibility to improve the end-to-
end Value Stream, and reports to the top person on-site.
3. A Value Stream should be broken into loops for implementation.
4. Until a Future State with less waste has been implemented, you
haven’t created any value.
Introduction to Lean
Current State
The Lean Value Stream
Future State
Implementing the Future State
Conclusion

Conclusion
Using the Value Stream Mapping Tool

Implementation
Plan

Future State
Map

Current State
Map

Product
Family
Definition
Implementation

Appoint a Value Stream Manager


Walk the flow at regular “pitch” intervals
Use point kaizen at the process and value
stream level

Process
Improvement

Value Stream Improvement


Value Stream Mapping

Helps you visualize flow to the customer


Links a value stream’s material and information
flows
Uses a common language
Creates a Strategic Improvement plan based on a
systemic process
Improvement Plan yields bottom line results
Value Stream Mapping Workshop
Objectives:
1. Teach the language of Lean
2. Introduce value stream mapping in a practical manner by
doing it
3. Understand what really makes a Lean value stream
4. Develop your ability to design future state value streams
5. Develop a successful implementation plan that gets it done!
Mixed Model Value Streams

Based on the book, Creating Mixed Model Value Streams by Kevin J. Duggan and published by Productivity Press,
this session will overview practical lean methods for building to demand. We will cover how to develop a mixed
model ‘pacemaker’ that can handle a high mix of products, each with different cycle times, variable demand, and
other real life challenges.

We will discuss concepts of true product families, machine loading, EPEI (Every Part Every Interval), pitch, Heijunka
(load leveling) scheduling, standard work, and managing demand changes. These advanced concepts will allow the
participant to understand how lean can be applied in real-life complex environments.

Learning Objectives
•Defining true product families for Value Stream Flow
•Creating continuous flow in a mixed-model environment
•Methods for machine loading
•How to determine equipment based EPEI at the pacemaker
•Methods for balancing for flow
•Developing pitch and scheduling the pacemaker
•Leveling the schedule with Mix Logic Charts
•Managing to customer demand changes
For more information about this class, please call Duggan &
Associates Inc.
at (401) 826-2007, or visit our website at www.dugganinc.com.
www.dugganinc.com.
Online Training in
Mixed Model Value Streams
This course is available online. It follows the
same standard work as the instructor
used today. To take this course online,
go to
www.leantrainingonline.com
or
www.dugganinc.com
Creating Flow Through
Shared Resources

This advanced session will cover how to create flow through processes that are shared with other value streams. The
concepts of branch takt times, multiple FIFO lanes, intervals (EPEI) for shared resources, and other advanced concepts will
be reviewed.

Processes such as heat treat, inspection, paint, and other monument equipment usually restrict value stream flow which
result in priority lists and expediting. This session will cover concepts such as upstream scheduling, multiple FIFO lanes,
Guaranteed Turnaround Times (GTT), flight schedules and other techniques to create flow through shared resources.

Learning Objectives
•Pacemaker placement in regards to shared resources
•Methods for determining intervals (EPEI) for shared resources For more information about this class, please call
•The concepts of branch takt time and average weighted cycle times Duggan & Associates Inc.
•The use of FIFO lane systems to flow through shared resources at (401) 826-2007, or visit our website at
•The use of flight schedules to handle batch processes www.dugganinc.com.
www.dugganinc.com.
•Scheduling and sequencing upstream resources
•Managing the flow through shared resources with visual systems such as EPEI wheels
Lean Supply Chain

The Practical Lean Supply Chain will provide participants with a clear understanding of the fundamental principles behind
creating a lean supply chain. This includes identifying the supply chain as Vertically Integrated (V.I.) or Final Assembly and Test
(F.A.T.) models. For each model, different methods for supplier connections will be covered. These methods include pull
systems, milk runs, bread runs, sequenced FIFO, and others. The type of part and the type of connection will also be covered.

Once connections are established, supplier integration into your value streams will be discussed. This includes understanding
supplier delivery capability, scheduling intervals, finished goods strategies, information flows, and supplier improvement
techniques.

The summary of applying supplier connections and supplier integration techniques into vertically integrated or final assembly
and test models will also be covered to provide a deep understanding of which model is best for your operation.

Learning Objectives For more information about this class, please call Duggan &
•Introduce the practical techniques to create a lean supply chain Associates Inc.
•Illustrate different supply chain models and how lean applies to them
at (401) 826-2007, or visit our website at www.dugganinc.com.
www.dugganinc.com.
•Understand various methods for supplier connections and what parts should use which connection
•Understand the differences between supplier connection and supplier integration
•Introduce methods for supplier integration
Lean Supply Chain

The Practical Lean Supply Chain will provide participants with a clear understanding of the fundamental principles behind
creating a lean supply chain. This includes identifying the supply chain as Vertically Integrated (V.I.) or Final Assembly and Test
(F.A.T.) models. For each model, different methods for supplier connections will be covered. These methods include pull
systems, milk runs, bread runs, sequenced FIFO, and others. The type of part and the type of connection will also be covered.

Once connections are established, supplier integration into your value streams will be discussed. This includes understanding
supplier delivery capability, scheduling intervals, finished goods strategies, information flows, and supplier improvement
techniques.

The summary of applying supplier connections and supplier integration techniques into vertically integrated or final assembly
and test models will also be covered to provide a deep understanding of which model is best for your operation.

Learning Objectives For more information about this class, please call Duggan &
•Introduce the practical techniques to create a lean supply chain Associates Inc.
•Illustrate different supply chain models and how lean applies to them
• at (401) 826-2007, or visit our website at www.dugganinc.com.
Understand various methods for supplier connections and what parts should use which connection www.dugganinc.com.

•Understand the differences between supplier connection and supplier integration


•Introduce methods for supplier integration