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Unit 36: Asian Cuisine

Mostly referred to as Chinese cuisine


in the past, this world-class cuisine
includes Southeast Asia, the
Philippines, India, and Japan

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ
American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Asian Cuisine
• More than just a stir fry, or a curry
• Can be described as a balance of flavors
• Influenced by a shortage of fuel, grazing land,
even food and cooking utensils
• There is a staggering array of foodstuffs
available
• Chinese cuisine was world-class 3,000 years
ago, rivaling even ancient Rome and Egypt

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Influences
• Chinese cuisine has • Geographic influences
influenced most of the include a vast coastline,
Asian cuisines, monumental distances
techniques, tools, cutting between pockets of
procedures, heat people in the deserts and
applications plains of China
• Introduced chopsticks • Colonization by Western
• Religion has a major Europeans
influence • Warring peoples
• Restrictions of certain • Nomadic lifestyles
meats, or any meats at • The monsoons and other
all, some types of fish climactic conditions
• Restrictions on certain
days, even months
© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ
American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Culinary Groups and Regions
• China, third largest country in the world,
cuisines include:
– Cantonese, offering dumplings, seafood, rich
sauces, minimal seasoning
– Szechwan, smoked, hot/spicy, uses chiles, mustard,
ginger
– Beijing, known for noodles, pancakes, rolls, meat-
filled buns, root vegetables, and fish and lamb;
described as light, elegant, and mildly seasoned

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Culinary Groups and Regions
(continued)
• Fujian, wet dishes, cooking slowly
in a broth, known for red grain,
which is a sticky, glutinous
fermented rice; dominant flavors
are salty, sweet, and hot
• Hunan, noted for presentations,
foods kept distinct and separate,
noted for hot, spicy, and sour;
game, fish, turtle

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Japan
• Noted for presentation
• Sushi, surimi, tempura very popular
in U.S. today
• Also known for dried fish, pickles
• Tofu, rice, and eggs and the
famous green tea found to be
excellent for minimizing heart disease
• A variety of seafood, vegetables, and little meat
• Teriyaki, wasabi, miso, fermented bean paste
• Tuna and the famous dashi
© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ
American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Southeast Asia
• Subtropical, rich in seafood,
fruits
• Areas include Vietnam, known
for fish sauce (nuoc mam),
shrimp paste, lemon grass,
mint, basil, and baguettes,
pastries, and custards
• These last products were
influenced by the French
colonization of the country
before the 1970s
© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ
American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Thailand
• Most notable feature of cuisine is
curry flavor
• Color of curry indicates the flavor
profile
• Green is the hottest, followed by red,
and yellow curry gets its flavor from
turmeric
• Mussaman (Muslim) curry includes
Middle Eastern spice influences
• Other important flavor ingredients
include kaffir lime leaves,
lemongrass, holy basil, tamarind,
galangal, sambal olek

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Other Areas of Culinary Notability
• Korea is influenced by China and
Japan
– Seafood, pickled vegetables and
cabbage (kimchee), hearty stews,
and a dish known as bulgogi
• Malaysia and the Philippines
– Meats, seafood (pork) and poultry is
easily grown or harvested
– The Philippines are also influence by
a long colonization by Spain, and by
the commerce and migration from
the mainland areas

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
India
• Great religious influences from the Hindus
and the Moslems
• One eats no beef or any meat, one eats
no pork and many fish varieties
• Buddhists eat no meat of any kind
because of reincarnation beliefs
• Growing season lasts all year long

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Foods of India
• Fragrant basmati rice, ghee, large
assortment of breads
• Stews, curries, chutneys, tandoori dishes,
spice blends known as masalas, rich in
dairy products
• Seafood and tropical fruits and vegetables

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Staple Foods of Asia
• Grain, throughout most areas
• Legumes, noodles, millet, and buckwheat
• Beans, nuts, seeds, lentils very popular
• Vegetables include bamboo shoots, water
chestnuts, okra from Africa, hearts of palm,
mushrooms
• Fruits include cherries, plums, peaches,
pomegranates, figs, citrus, apples, carambolas,
and bananas

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Meats, Poultry, and Fish
• Northern countries rely on lamb
and sheep
• Fresh- and saltwater fish are
available to most countries
• Chickens and ducks are
everywhere
• Pork is available throughout,
while beef is available in the big
grazing plains

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Common Flavors
• Every region and country has a
distinct flavor profile
• Some very hot, some subtle and
some mild
• Flavor profiles come from various
combinations: of cilantro, mint,
basil, lemongrass, fermented
sauces and pastes such as bean
paste, soy sauce, rice wine and
vinegar, pickled ginger, fish sauce
(nouc man), Hoisan and plum
sauce

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Cooking Methods
• Stir-frying, cutting foods • Simmering and braising
to shorten cooking times, • Salads used to cool the
and use little oil and heat
heat in other dishes
• Steaming, used to
prepare dumplings, • Grilling, often over open
steamed fish in bamboo fires or braisiers
baskets, steam bread • Nomadic people pick up
• Deep-frying, tempura in dried dung for fuel
Japan uses rice flour,
peanut oil in other areas

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ
American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.
Preserved Foods
• Little or no refrigeration and/or
electricity in many areas
• People shop every day
• Dried fish, pickled vegetables,
smoked meats
• Preserved and dried fruits

© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ


American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.
07458. All Rights Reserved.