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HDF 190:

FIRST YEAR LEADERS INSPIRED TO EXCELLENCE LEADERSHIP PORTFOLIO

Stephanie Robertson SPRING 2018

stephjbrob@my.uri.edu

TABLE OF CONTENTS Strengths Opening Statement SLIDE 4 Section 1: Self Leadership SLIDE 5 Section 2:
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Strengths
Opening Statement
SLIDE 4
Section 1: Self Leadership
SLIDE 5
Section 2: Leadership Theories
Section 3: Inclusive Leadership
Section 4: Critical Thinking
Section 5: Interpersonal/Organizational Leadership
SLIDE 7
SLIDE 9
SLIDE 11
SLIDE 13

Signature Strengths

Individualization

Learner

Responsibility

Discipline

Analytical

Values in Action Strengths

Love

Honesty

Perspective

Teamwork

Humor

OPENING STATEMENT

My name is Stephanie Robertson and I am a first year student at the University of Rhode Island, pursuing a Doctor of Pharmacy major with a minor in Leadership studies. HDF

190 has taught me so much about myself, discovering my own strengths and values,

and learning how to put them into action. I have become more confident in myself as a leader and have experienced a more profound desire to serve. My goal as I progress through the Leadership minor is to learn more about myself and others, being an open- minded and inquisitive individual. I also want to opportunity to take what I learn and put it into action throughout my community and through leadership roles I assume within

organizations at URI. Throughout HDF 190, I learned a lot about different approaches to

leadership through the examination of many theories and models. I identify most with the Servant Leadership Theory, which identifies a natural feeling to serve and is committed to the growth of others.

Outcome #17:Student will describe StrengthsQuest Signature Themes, shadow side of Strengths and/or weaknesses, and examples of
Outcome #17:Student will describe StrengthsQuest Signature Themes, shadow side of Strengths and/or weaknesses, and examples of
Outcome #17:Student will describe StrengthsQuest Signature Themes,
shadow side of Strengths and/or weaknesses, and examples of application
(Source = Gallup)
Target Class: HDF 190
Additional Experiences: Cross Country, RA Interviews, Group Projects

SECTION 1

SELF LEADERSHIP

In HDF 190, we completed the Strengths Finder Inventory created by Don Clifton. Upon completion, my top strengths were revealed. They are analytical, discipline, individualization, learner, and responsibility. It was interesting to see just how accurate these results represented me.

My strengths allow me to be a versatile member of society. I can assume many roles, whether I am independently accomplishing a task or working with a team. My strengths have shone through as a member of the cross-country team. This sport is unique because it is particularly more individualized, meaning every member is putting in their own personal level of effort. However, at the end of the day, every runner is running the same race. I was not the fastest runner by any means. Yet, I was a huge attribute to the team because of my discipline. This sport is just as much mentally

daunting as it is physical. It takes a lot of courage and strength to persevere through hard workouts. My teammates and I would’ve been lying if we said there was never a moment where we wanted to give up. It was important for me to have a plan for myself and make sure I did whatever I can to

execute it, no matter how hard it was during the process. I reciprocated the same discipline I had on myself to my teammates, pushing them along during races, or cheering them on along the sidelines.

I used my strengths to get through my RA interview. As a responsible and analytical individual, I prepared for all possible questions I thought they may ask. In an interview, you are basically selling yourself, so I wanted to put my best foot forward. I am responsible for what I say and do and I understand authenticity is key in situations like this.

The strength of learning definitely speaks to me the most. I am passionate about learning and growing intellectually and as a human in society. There’s so much to know about the world around us and more particularly in my future profession as a clinical pharmacist. I can’t wait to see the where this quest takes me as I progress as a student at URI and beyond.

I experience weaknesses especially as an analytical person. I am a stickler for detail, and often times, that can hinder my progress on a project or a goal I set for myself or for a group. I think about all possible features of a situation and attempt to achieve perfection in what I do. As they always say, though, we need to turn our weaknesses into positives. I am great at time management and making sure I get everything done and to the best of my ability.

Gallup, Inc. (n.d.). Clifton Strengths for Students. Retrieved from http://www.strengthsquest.com/home/default.aspx

Outcome #27: Student will show knowledge of the “Servant Leadership” theory of leadership by Greenleaf Target
Outcome #27: Student will show knowledge of the “Servant Leadership” theory of leadership by Greenleaf Target
Outcome #27: Student will show knowledge of the “Servant Leadership”
theory of leadership by Greenleaf
Target Class: HDF 190

SECTION 2 Leadership Theory and Models

Servant Leadership was coined by Robert K. Greenleaf in 1970. The servant leadership model revolves around the natural feeling or desire to serve. It enhances the idea that others should grow as a result of one’s service. There are ten components that are central to the development of servant leadership. Listening, empathy, healing, awareness, persuasion, conceptualization, foresight,

stewardship, commitment to the growth of people, and building community. Listening requires a leader to practice active listening

techniques. Empathy means being accepting and understanding towards others and having the ability to empathize. A servant leader should possess the power to heal others and relationships, meaning servicing them and uplifting their spirits. Being aware of

one self and aware of one’s surroundings is key for a servant leader’s success. This means being able to use your strengths and values to positively impact another person or a community. Persuasion involves a servant leader to convince others rather than force others to comply with his/her leadership. Conceptualization means a servant leader should approach tasks or ideas more broadly and think of long term goals and accomplishments, not merely day-to-day goals. Foresight means a servant leader can gather information and lessons from the past as well as realities of present-day and apply this knowledge to make better informed decisions

for the future. Stewardship is being open and committed to servicing others. Servant-leaders are committed to the growth of people. This means taking a personal interest in benefitting those around oneself and striving to have others flourish personally and

professionally. The last component of the servant leadership theory is building community. Means of going about this would be to create a sense of community among individuals within businesses and other institutions.

Greenleaf, R. K. (2008). The servant as leader. Westfield: The Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership .

SECTION 3 Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and Its Application to Leadership

Outcome #97: Student will create a personal code of inclusive leadership Target Class: HDF 190 Additional
Outcome #97: Student will create a personal code of inclusive leadership
Target Class: HDF 190
Additional Experiences: URI 101 Mentor Training

SECTION 3

Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and Its Application to Leadership

Inclusive leadership to me means respecting the ideas, values, and beliefs of every individual. Prior to

college, I was a bit less outgoing than I am today. For me, I feel I have a personal duty to include everyone when I am working within a group. The Relational Leadership Model has enhanced my understanding of inclusive leadership. Building relationships with others is successful when I am on equal

footing with everyone else. We all have our own strengths and weaknesses within a group and it is

important for me, as an individualizer, to highlight each individual’s qualities. When people feel respected

and heard, the group dynamic is much more effective and enjoyable. A big part of inclusive leadership to

me is feeling comfortable when working with others who are different than I. I am a strong advocate of diversity because it adds substance, creativity, and new perspectives. Group communication is key, so it

is important that my language, as well as everyone else’s, is inclusive to all. In URI 101 Mentor Training,

we did an activity on inclusive language, where we came up with words and phrases that should be said

rather than what may be offensive, disrespectful, or not inclusive to all people. For example, rather than

saying “You guys,” say, “You all.” This way all genders feel included. I believe the big takeaway from this

is to understand the intent versus the impact your words have on others.

SECTION 4 Critical Thinking

Outcome #99: Student will demonstrate proficiency of critical thinking Target Class: HDF 190 Additional Experiences: KIN
Outcome #99: Student will demonstrate proficiency of critical thinking
Target Class: HDF 190
Additional Experiences: KIN 375G, Mental Health Awareness Day

SECTION 4 Critical Thinking

Critical thinking involves analyzing and assessing information given to you. Analyzer and learner are two of my

top strengths, so I am always partaking in critical thinking. I strive to grow intellectually by being inquisitive. “The gears are always turning,” as I like to say. Problem solving is a huge component to critical thinking. I am always

seeking solutions or ways to be of service in complex issues.

In my KIN 375G class, Exercise is Medicine, we covered a unit on Mental Health, more specifically on depression and anxiety. I identify mental health as a growing disease that needs to be controlled. Having a family member suffer from mental health, this issue hits close to home. My professor encouraged us to research this topic more

in depth. As a critical thinker, I think to myself, “What are some ways we can reduce the risk of mental health? How do we go about curing this matter and preventing it from affecting more people?” Through raising these

important questions in my research, I learned a lot about natural preventatives and reducers for depression and anxiety. Through my research, I observed aerobic exercise, for example, significantly reduces clinical depression

symptoms. I checked for accuracy and significance in my findings, as any critical thinker should do, with studies

to support claims. I also came to the conclusion that raising awareness could encourage more young, inquisitive minds to take interest in mental health. The Mental Health Awareness event on the quad in April encouraged students to learn more about the condition and become aware of the severity of it, to hopefully lead more critical thinkers in promoting and making change.

SECTION 5 Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts and Skills

Outcome #109: Student will demonstrate knowledge of active listening techniques Target Class: HDF 190 Additional Experiences:
Outcome #109: Student will demonstrate knowledge of active listening
techniques
Target Class: HDF 190
Additional Experiences: HDF 190 Retreat

SECTION 5

Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts and Skills

Active Listening, introduced by Dr. Thomas Gordon, requires the listener to be fully engulfed in conversation, participating in the discussion rather than simply being a passive listener. There are five components to active listening. The first is encouraging, which means maintaining conversation and emitting positivity when necessary. The listener should express interest in what the speaker is conveying. Secondly, restating basic ideas, which requires the

listener to express understanding in the topic by repeating key points made in conversation.

Reflecting feelings is next. This requires the listener to reflect the speaker’s feelings to

demonstrate he/she is aware of how the speaker feels on the topic being discussed. The fourth component, clarifying, means the listener should ask questions and gain additional information on the situation that he/she may not have completely understood. Lastly, summarizing is a component to active listening. This simply means tying all the information

together to gain a clear perspective on the speaker’s thoughts and feelings. Summarizing

creates a basis for more discussion.

Gordon, Thomas. (1971). Parent Effectiveness Training. New York, NY: Peter H. Wyden, Inc.