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THE GCSE ENGLISH EXAM

IS THIS
AFTERNOON!!!!!!!!!!!
Let’s revise the GCSE ENGLISH EXAM
steps to....................
READING SECTION - 1 hour 10 mins

Read with mind and PEN – underline / circle the


articles and the question

Q1 – GO FETCH, COPY 4 clear quotes

MOVE ON
Q2– EVIDENCE + INFERENCE (P.E.E)

Be clear about what the question wants you to find go


into the text and find examples of it – circle them! Use
them in your answer but make sure you follow each one
with an inference........
This suggests....
This tells us....
This implies....
You can infer from this that.....
This makes us think....

Q3 – SAME AS ABOVE, BUT MORE


Q4 – LANGUAGE ANALYSIS – read question
carefully, what does it want you to find??

GO FIND IT.

Use what you have found in PEER’s that...


NAME and EXPLAIN LANGUAGE FEATURES.
How does the webpage use language:

•To inform
•To persuade schools to take part in Sport relief?
(12 marks)

STEP 1 – STEP 2 –

GO FETCH USE WHAT YOU HAVE STEP 2a –


EXAMPLES OF FOUND TO WRITE
AS YOU WRITE TRY
LANGUAGE THAT YOUR ANSWER – TO NAME WHAT
IS INFORMING. USING P.E.E. TYPE OF LANGUAGE
IT IS!
FIND 3 EXAMPLES START WITH THE
FROM DIFFERENT WORDS FROM THE
PARTS QUESTION
EXAMPLE ANSWER

The webpage uses language to inform us about what we could do to dress up


for fancy dress. This is given in response to the question ‘Why don’t you..’ the
text then gives three bullet points of information about what you could dress up
in. The language used to present the information all start with clear commands
/ instructions / verbs, such as ‘challenge,’ ‘Get,’ and ‘Ask.’ by using these it helps
to make the information clearer.

At the end of the webpage there are hyperlinks that readers can click on to get
further information. One of the links uses statistics to inform us how our
money could help: ‘£25 could provide 10 street children in India with their own
bank account.’ This clearly tells us who the charity helps and how a little amount
can go a long way.

Another sentence that informs us is: ‘click on the icons to check out our top
fundraising ideas.’ This is a really useful, clear instruction as if someone wasn’t
use to using web pages they are told about where to find extra information.
Q5– COMPARE PRESENTATIONAL DEVICES –

1. Decide on the 2 texts to compare, separate them and have


them side by side in front of you.
2. Look out for how they have used IMAGE – link to texts
message and impact on reader – WRITE ABOUT IT
3. Look out for how they have used COLOUR – write about it
4. Look out for how they have used FONT – write about it
5. Look out for ANY OTHER unique presentational features that
the either text has used and write about them.
Both have......however....Text 1....but....in a
different way.....similar to text 1....but

LINK THEM TO TEXTS MESSAGE


PRESENTATIONAL FEATURES ARE USUALLY:
• USE OF COLOUR- what it represents / symbolises
• DIFFERENT FONT STYLES AND SIZE
• VISUAL IMAGES: photo, cartoon, painting – real / close up / staged
• LOGO
• HEADLINES
• SUBHEADINGS
• BULLET POINTS
• SHAPED SECTIONS
• DIAGRAMS / CHARTS
• WEBSITE TOOLS – ICONS, TABS, NAVIGATION BAR, SEARCH
THEY ARE ALWAYS USED TO:
SUPPORT THE TEXT / THE WRITER’S MESSAGE OR PURPOSE.
AND / OR
HELP NAVIGATE THE READER, ACCESS THE CONTENT OF THE TEXT EASIER
Write in paragraphs that
link / follow on from each
other in a logical order and
begin with discourse markers
that lead the reader onto the
point you are making.
The dance beat boomed from speakers on the stage as we
entered the room with the spinning lights. I smiled to see
children: different ages, different sizes, dancing happily on
the dance floor. Huge electric blue ballons spelt out the
name Sonny and bobbed across the stage as though joining
in the dance. My eyes scanned the room trying to find
Sonny’s Mum whilst my two children clung to my sides like
soldiers , being a bit too scared to join the action.

On Sunday afternoon, I attended the Christening of my friend’s


baby, called Sonny. It was a really enjoyable afternoon, spent
in the company of friends at our local social club: St. Aidans.

We are mostly Catholics and therefore think this day is a really


special time. A day when God blesses the little one into our
world. I felt happy and proud to have been invited with my
Husband and my own two children.
Still plan to include:
PLAN YOUR
WHO PARAGRAPHS
WHAT
WHEN AROUND A MAIN
WHY POINT, TIME, PLACE
WHERE OR PERSON.
HOW

Make sure you include Use CONNECTIVES to start


REASONS paragraphs and sentences
for everything.
when it is appropriate.
Lots of……….because
WRITING TO EXPLAIN……

EXAM QUESTION

A new TV series ‘Dream Jobs’ is giving people the


chance to work in their dream job for a day.

WRITE A LETTER TO THE PRODUCERS EXPLAINING


WHAT YOUR DREAM JOB WOULD BE AND WHY YOU
WOULD LOVE TO TRY IT.

(16 marks) 25 minutes


Cover all areas: up,
down, left, right, in
THINK IN IMAGES – Include SENSES
the distance, in front
WHAT WOULD A
CAMERA CAPTURE????
of you, behind, inside,
outside
WRITING SECTION – 1 HOUR 5 MINS

Answer the 24 mark question FIRST

35 MINUTES – 5 MINS TO PLAN – 30 TO WRITE

Read the task carefully – THINK with PEN – purpose? audience? Letter,
article, leaflet, webpage??

PLAN OUT WHAT YOU WILL INCLUDE.


Try to come up with 4 – 5 reasons / examples / details / information
that will support what you want to say.
WRITE an ATTENTION GRABBING opening paragraph that SPEAKS to
the reader.
USE your 4 – 5 points by putting each one in a paragraph. DEVELOP
just one point in each paragraph.

END with a SHORT (for effect) but POWERFUL last paragraph!!!!!!!!


Writing to Describe
• Effective writing makes
you feel almost as if
you're 'there'

N.B.
You are writing to
describe; you are not
telling a story.
How to approach your description
• What does it look like?
• What does it sound
like?
• What does it feel like?
• What does it taste like?
• What does it smell like?
KEY TERM!

• IMAGERY
Words can be chosen to create more than just
meaning: they create feeling, too. Some words
(or phrases) are able to create a particularly
vivid sense such as a picture, a sound, a taste,
etc. This effect is called imagery.
KEY TERM!

• Imagery is a very important feature of


descriptive writing and, especially, of poetry.
The most common way by which a writer can
create imagery is through the use of figurative
language (figures of speech), typically through
the use of metaphor, simile and
personification.
HOW TO WRITE DESCRIPTIVELY
Imagine yourself to be a kind of 'human
camera‘. With your searching zoom lens you
are going to 'record' what is in the particular
scene or situation the question asks you to
describe.
The ‘images' from your camera will provide
the substance for what you describe.
HOW TO WRITE DESCRIPTIVELY
Note:
a good structure is crucial to a high grade.
This can be achieved in several ways, for
example, by describing each of the ‘images'
from your location by location: 'In the
corner...'; 'By the church wall...'; 'In the sky...';
'Over there...';
• other structures that work are: from inside to
outside..., from then to now..., from the
'general' to the 'particular'.
• Structure provides 'shape' to your writing and
can gain many marks.
Never write
in the form of
a short story.
• Instead of a story simply write a
short piece of purely descriptive
writing: 'zoom in' and 'focus' the
lens of your 'camera' on the
kind of scene asked in the exam
question.
• Help your reader feel as if he or
she were actually there,
experiencing the scene being
described.
• In short exam answers
of this kind, again, it
can be best not to be a
part of the action;
instead, be merely an
observer and a reporter
of the event
(so... no 'I saw...').
24 MARKS

As you read the next few slides, try to bullet point the
techniques the student has used and any good
vocabulary that match the purpose of the task well.
Mark Band 3
11-16 marks
clear success
Communication
•shows clarity of thought and communicates with success
•engages the reader with more detailed persuasive ideas
•clearly communicates the purpose of writing the article
•writes in a register which is appropriate for audience
•uses linguistic features as appropriate to purpose
•uses vocabulary effectively including discursive markers e.g.
‘Furthermore’, ‘Alternatively’

Organisation of Ideas
•uses paragraphs effectively in the whole text
•uses a variety of structural features e.g. different paragraph
lengths, indented sections if appropriate
Writing to Argue: useful phrases
firstly…
secondly...
whereas…
the most important aspect…
sometimes…
on the other hand…
on balance…
opponents declare… but…
other people say… but….moreover…
despite the view that…
notwithstanding…
research shows that…
another factor to be considered is… however…
nevertheless…
Key features of writing to argue:
formal language
balanced sentences
people’s opinions (real or made up)
specific examples of situations
range and variety of points
countering opposing points of
Writing to Persuade: useful phrases
some people think…
what would happen if…
all reasonable people think…
we need to make sure that…
imagine what would happen if…
it would be useful to consider…
do we really want to…?
I am sure you will agree…
in my experience…
what would the consequences be…? Key features of writing to persuade
it is frightening to think that… emotive language
I have no doubt… apparent balance
there can only be one conclusion… mixture of first, second and third person
do they really think that…? some short sentences
by far the best solution would rhetorical questions
some use of alliteration, metaphor, groups of
three
identify with the audience by using ‘we’
perhaps attempt to shock the reader into
agreement
varied choice of adverbs and adjectives