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CONCEPT OF POVERTY-ENVIRONMENT-CLIMATE NEXUS

BACKGROUND OF PECM
RELEVANCE OF THE PROJECT
FOCUSING AREAS
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE PECM PROJECT
ON THE WAY TO ACHIEVEMENT
TARGETS OF THE PECM PROJECT
WAY FORWARD
CHALLENGES AND CONSTRAINTS
Implementing Agency: General Economics Division,
Planning Commission

Development Partners: UNDP, and UNDP-UNEP PEI

Total Contribution: US $1.00m (686.50 Lakh taka)

Implementing Period: July, 2010 – September, 2013

Physical Progress: 70% (up to June 2012)

Financial Progress: 59% (up to June 2012)


FOCUSING:
 Mainstreaming: Poverty-Environment-Climate-Disaster
nexus into national level planning and budgeting
processes.

BECAUSE:
 Environmental management, climate change adaptation
and mitigation and poverty are interlinked
 It is interdependent in nature

 A key indicator of the Sustainable Development.

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 Largest Delta in the world, located in GBM basin
 30 Agro-ecological Zones
 Diverse ecological systems: coastal eco-system, hill
eco-system, floodplain ecosystem
 Agriculture dominated economy
 High exposure to flood, cyclone, salinity, drought,
landslide
 High susceptibility to Earthquake and Sea Level Rise
 Highly vulnerable country to climate change impacts -
3.7% of GDP loss due to flood and Cyclone Sidr in
2007, while 0.31 % loss due to Aila in 2009
 Targeted average growth is 7% in Sixth FYP

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1. Link with Sustainable Development Goal
• Earth Summit 1992 in Rio (Agenda 21)
• World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg
(2002)
• Earth Summit 2012 in Rio (popularly called as Rio 20+)
2. Constitutional Obligation
• 18/ka (A) of Bangladesh Constitution 2011
3. Regulatory Framework
 ECA 1995 and revised 2010
 ECR 1997 and revised 2010
 Wetland Conservation Act 2000; and other related acts.

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Delta Plan 2100
• Now at inception stage
• Major focus on environment, climate change, disaster and thus
overall sustainable development goals
7th Five Year Plan (2016 -2020)
• Preparatory work will start in Mid June 2013
• This 7th FYP needs to reflect the global and national lessons
learned and obligations

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To enhance the institutional capacity of
targeted national stakeholders to integrate
poverty-environment-climate linkages
into national development planning
processes. This integration will promote more
sustainable economic development in Bangladesh.

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 Support the integration of climate change and
environmental considerations into national
development planning and budgeting
processes; and

 Enhance UN’s country assistance to provide


effective support towards climate-resilient
poverty reduction efforts.

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Output 1.1: Development and dissemination of social and
economic analysis of climate change on key development
priorities

Output 1.2: PEC) issues integrated into key national and


sectoral planning documents

Objective 1 Output 1.3 : National level training, advocacy and knowledge


Poverty- Environment- Climate management on PEC mainstreaming through dissemination
issues mainstreamed into of analysis and findings
national level planning and
budgeting processes Output 1.4: DPP revised to include PEC issues in
development planning and appraisal processes

Output 1.5: Improve the current development budget to


ensure adequate investment in PECM related purposes

Output 1.6: Support for Planning Commission to


institutionalize climate mainstreaming process

Output 1.7: Effective PECM programme management

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 Development and dissemination of social and economic
analysis of climate change on key development priorities.
 PEC issues integrated into key national and sectoral
planning documents.
 National level training, advocacy and knowledge
management on PEC mainstreaming through dissemination
of analysis and findings
 Development Project Proforma (DPP) revised to include
PEC issues in development planning and appraisal processes.
 Improve the current development budget (ADP) to ensure
adequate investment in PECM-related purposes.
 Support for Planning Commission to institutionalize
climate mainstreaming process.

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National Steering
National Technical
Committee
Advisory Committee
(NSC)/Outcome
(NTAC)
Board

Project Management Project Management


Board (PMB) Unit (PMU)

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◦ Analysis, Dissemination and Policy Advocacy
◦ Mainstreaming Climate Change in Planning and
Budget Process
◦ Training, Communication and Knowledge
Management
◦ Climate Sensitive Development Guidelines (ADP
&DPP)
◦ Climate Public Expenditure Review and Climate
Fiscal Framework
◦ Broadening partnership across public sectors,
civil society and Academia

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PEC Nexus mainstreamed in the National Plans
1. Sixth Five-Year Plan (SFYP) 2011-15
- In part -1: Chapter 8
- In part- 2: Chapter 10
2. Perspective Plan 2010-2021 : Making Vision 2021 a
Reality
- In Chapter 13
3. National Sustainable Development strategy (NSDS)
4. Bangladesh Delta Plan 2100

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5. PEC Nexus incorporation in the National
Development (ADP and DPP) Process
- The Annual Development Programme (ADP) Guideline 2012-13
6. Revision of DPP/TPP
7. Case Project Analysis
8. Indicator Framework
9. Climate Public Expenditure and Institutional Review
(CPEIR)
10. Capacity Building of Public Sector Planning
Professionals
11. Creation of E-platform

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 PEC mainstreaming in the Delta Plan
 Local Climate Fiscal Framework in 8 Pilot Unions.
 National Climate Fiscal Framework
 Framework of Indicators for Pro-Poor, Environment
Friendly Low Emission Disaster and Climate Resilient
Development
 Climate and Disaster Sensitive Development Project
Design Manual for Public Sector
 200 additional planning professionals’ capacity building on
climate and disaster sensitive project design in public
sector.

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Objective:
 To rdevise Development Project Proforma (DPP)
integrating disaster and climate change risks in feasibility
and design stages
Process:
 Revised DPP/TPP Draft prepared in 2011 to incorporate
PEC issues
 4 separate consultative workshops organized with
stakeholders in the 4 Sector Division of Planning
Commission
 Feedback from workshops incorporated in the revision
 The Guideline, May 2008) is ready for Final Revision of
DPP/TPP (including the validation through a high level
consultation)
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Agriculture, Water Resources and Rural Institutions Division

Industry & Energy Division

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Socio Economic Infrastructure Division

Physical Infrastructure Division

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Objective:

 To analyze the content of DPP of sectoral case projects


based on specific and generic PEC indicators.
 To identify gaps and possible scope for integrating PEC
nexus in the project design, implementation and evaluation
process.
 To prepare a guideline to incorporate PEC and DRR issues in
the development programs of Bangladesh

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Methodology/Process:
 Fine tune the specific PEC nexus indicators for case project analysis.
 Content analysis of the DPP of sectoral case projects and identify gaps
 Conduct meeting/workshop and discussions with relevant agencies
and ministries for clarification about identified gaps during content
analysis.
 Visit project sites and conduct interviews with primary, secondary and
tertiary stakeholders.
 Develop a draft observation note on PEC analysis of the selected case
projects.
 Validate the draft observation and PEC analysis with relevant
agencies/ministries and primary and secondary stakeholders.
 Prepare a final report incorporating feedback of the
agencies/ministries.
 Present the observation and PEC analysis to the SEST and NTAC
meetings.

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Indicators:
1. Poverty, Environment, Climate Change and Disaster
nexus indicators
 Not only sectoral growth but also
 Benefit of poor and marginal farmers, fishers and livestock
dependent HHs
 Do not harm the environmental services
 Can adapt to future climate change impact in four sectors:
increasing floods, drought, salinity, cyclone, sea level rise, water
logging.
 Also address the current flood, drought, salinity, cyclone and water
logging shocks.

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Indicators:
2. Poverty Reduction
 % of poor people directly benefited
◦ % poor women benefitted
◦ % poor and marginal HHs benefited from project
 % of poor people’s HH income and non-farm activities increased
 High Transaction Cost
 No. of HHs economic asset loss protected
 % of poor HHs access to natural resources/common resources
increased
 % of poor HHs employment increased and diversified
 % of poor HHs access to education, shelter, health, sanitation
and safe water increased
 % of poor HHs increased minimum calorie and protein intake
from diversified food

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Indicators:
3. Sustainable Environment
 Protection Indicators: Air quality, Soil quality and fertility, Water
quality, Chemical Pollution, Land Degradation, Noise Pollution,
Heavy Metal Pollution, Ground Water Level, Coastal Ecology
 Conservation Indicators: Fish Sanctuary, Wildlife Sanctuary,
Forest Resources, Local Species, Biodiversity, Wetland
Conservation, Agricultural Land, Hill Ecology
 Natural Resource Management Indicators: Water Resource, Flora
and Fauna, Forest, Open Water, Wetlands, River and River Bank
Management, Silt management, Drainage Spoil Management, Hill
Ecology Management, and Land Reclamation

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Indicators:
4. Climate Change and Disaster
Climate Change:
 Address the adaptation measure to additional exposure due to
climate change in project design, infrastructure development,
innovation, awareness, communication and extension works.
 The project result is resilient at least to 2030 climate change
impact prediction/ Address incremental risk
Disaster:
 The project considers past disaster lesson in project design
 The project enhance the capacity of local people and institutions
in building resilience disasters
 The project does not cause future disasters

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Progress:

 8 case project report is final


 12 Case project Report has sent to Agency for comments and
suggestion
 2 Field visit in remaining
 Compilation of all report is on going

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One House One Farm Project
(June 2009 – July 2014)

Community Group Discussion Community Group Discussion Visiting Project Components

Scenario of Project Area


Discussion with Project Staff Project Site Visit

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Poverty Reduction Implication of the Project
 Beneficiary selection is not done in a proper way
 Assets are not equally distributed among the poor which
may create dissatisfaction among the beneficiaries
 Structural poverty and Gender issues are not addressed
properly
 The project’s contribution is low
◦ in reducing transition cost to get public services

◦ in protecting poor HHs economic asset loss

◦ In poor HHs access to natural resources/common


resources

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Sustainable Environment Implication of the Project
 The project has no component regarding environment
pollution, especially in the agricultural process.
 No environmental component has been focused in the
training of the beneficiary group
 Environmental Conservation has not been considered
 Natural Resource Management and Use which is very
crucial in rural development has not been addressed
adequately

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Climate Change (Adaptation & Mitigation) Implication
 Impact of Climate Change on project activities has not been
analyzed.
 Adaptation measure for additional exposure due to climate
change is not addressed, infrastructure development.
 No mitigation aspects involved within the project components

Disaster Resilience Implication


 No consideration has been identified for Disaster Risk Reduction
(DRR)
 The project does not consider any plan to reduce future disasters,
nor takes lessons from past disasters, according to DPP

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 BARD as training implementation agency can incorporate climate
change and disaster issues in training modules for selected
households
 Beneficiary selection could be done in a participatory manner
using PRA methods
 Livelihood options should be chosen based on agro-ecological
zone considering the hazard and ecology
 The project will be able to reduce poverty of the poor people if
asset distribution and microfinance activity is properly done.
 Research and discussion regarding environment and climate
change will be helpful in the future.
 During or before revision, the environment, climate and income
generating activities need to be addressed properly.
 Costing should be done in a calculative manner when project
design is revised

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Community Based Resource Management (CBRM) Project
(June 2007 – July 2011)

Meeting with Jumgaon Ethnic Discussion with World Fish Visiting the Block Road
Community Center (WFC) Construction

Submersible Bridge by CBRM Meeting with CO, BUG Members Agricultural Components of the
Project Project

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Poverty Reduction Implication of the Project
 Most of the project component focused on poverty reduction and income
generation by increasing accessibility of the poor to markets, services, natural &
financial resources, especially the women.
 Livelihood of the poor improved through ensuring access to the natural
resources (beels) by the real owners/ the poor community.
 The project includes mostly the poor people of the community who has less than
2.5 acres of land area.
 Women empowerment has been focused by involving them in fish separation,
block road construction, tree plantation, vegetables growing and microfinance.
 Structural poverty has been addressed indirectly
 Some social barriers such as established culture of not using safe water and
healthy sanitation cause deprivation
 The beneficiaries group received money directly from the head-office to avoid
the bureaucratic complexity and transaction cost
 Village Protection Wall and Block Road helped to reduce economic asset loss
due to flash flood and natural hazards
 Calorie and protein intake by the poor household increased

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Sustainable Environment Implication of the Project

 The CBRM project discourages the use of chemical fertilized for agricultural
production to ensure good soil and water quality. IPM and compost fertilizer
is promoted to reduce the adverse impact of the project on environment.
 Due to the fish sanctuaries the fish biodiversity increased (average number
of species from 33 to 42) during the project period.
 The scope of the project does not include integrated water resources
management.
 The restoration of this local forest (swamp trees) provides quality habitat for
fish and other species in the wetland area.
 No management of the silt carried out by flash flood has been considered
yet.
 Beel connecting khals and lakes are taken under the excavation works, but
the connectivity with the river system is not in the scope of the project.
BWDB is not cooperating in this case.

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Climate Change (Adaptation & Mitigation) of the Project
 Till now no specific steps exist within the scope of the project to address the climate
change impact on project components.
 In case of constructing flood protection wall the frequency and intensity of the natural
hazard due to climate variability need to be assessed. (like: what change might take
place in the water level during flood/ flash flood)
 The restoration of the local swamp forests may contribute in climate change
mitigation

Disaster Resilience Implication of the Project


 Promotion of early growing varieties reduces the economic asset loss from flash flood
and pre-monsoon flood.
 Lessons have been taken from the past disasters in Block Road construction
including the height of water level during seasonal flood and flash flood.
 No training has been given to the local people regarding disaster impact reduction
and mitigation.
 Using surface water for irrigation may improve underground water storage, but may
cause the disruption in the fish sanctuaries during dry season.

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 The project should emphasize the long term sustainability of
project’s activities by incorporating local institutions, administration
and community people with specified responsibilities.
 Proper coordination and integration required among the line
departments to ensure the accessibility of the legal owner
(community people) to the natural resources.
 Crop intensity need to be increased to ensure required food intake.
 Integrated Water Management system
 The change in temperature, humidity, moisture should also be
incorporated in the agricultural research component.
 Floating and hydro-phonic vegetable production may be introduced
under the project to protect the loss of agricultural production due to
disaster.
 Dug-well / ring-well can be set-up for protecting the community from
arsenic contamination and providing with safe drinking water.

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Participatory Rural Development Project (PRDP) Phase II
(June 2005-June 2014)

The female member of the Gram Committee


expressing their health and training needs in the
Gram Committee Meeting
The drainage without having consideration
of existing slope and proper maintenance
being blocked.

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 Needs of the poor should be assessed and prioritized in the
UCCM using the knowledge of the experts of NBDs for
sustainable rural development initiatives;
 Pro-poor access to common/natural resources to be ensured
by preparation of an appropriate plan and its enforcement
through relevant changes in Acts and Rules;
 Promotion of marketing facilities can ensure true benefit of
the project to the beneficiaries.
 The issues related to environmental pollution and
conservation, natural resources management and utilization
should be incorporated in the training module developed by
the project and training should be provided to the rural
beneficiary group accordingly to build awareness among
them and ensure the implications through their practice.

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 Needs of the poor should be assessed and prioritized in the
UCCM using the knowledge of the experts of NBDs for
sustainable rural development initiatives;
 Pro-poor access to common/natural resources to be ensured
by preparation of an appropriate plan and its enforcement
through relevant changes in Acts and Rules;
 Promotion of marketing facilities can ensure true benefit of
the project to the beneficiaries.
 The issues related to environmental pollution and
conservation, natural resources management and utilization
should be incorporated in the training module developed by
the project and training should be provided to the rural
beneficiary group accordingly to build awareness among
them and ensure the implications through their practice.

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South-Western Bangladesh Rural Development Project (SWBRDP)
(January 2010- December 2013)

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 The mechanism for compensation of the affected poor people by
different components of the project should be developed and made
functional.
 The women employed for the construction and maintenance of
roads should get paid directly from the project to their accounts to
smooth the payment procedure. The updated balance of the savings
account should be disseminated to the women employee on
monthly basis to make the process more transparent.
 The detail information of the project components should be
discussed with the local people before the selection and
implementation process. Selection criteria for rural and union roads
and growth centers should include the environmental conservation
and natural resources management aspects.
 The supervisors and the workers require proper training on the
quality construction and maintenance procedures.
 The environmental considerations required to be incorporated in the
design drawings of the growth centers and roads

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Cox’s Bazar-Teknaf Marine drive Road Project, Phase-II
(July 2009 – June 2013)

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Poverty Reduction Implication of the Project
 The project did not benefit the poor people rather made vulnerable as their
relative income has reduced.
 The project created Income Generating Activities for women through their
involvement in the construction process.
 The construction of the highway caused acquisition of private properties and
cutting plants for which a compensation mechanism has been adopted in the
project.
 The highway will promote transportation facilities and thus will ease the access
to the natural resources and public services.

Sustainable Environment Implication of the Project


 The project includes protective works to reduce the soil erosion.
 The project has negative environmental impact due to hill cutting and are
vulnerable to the landslide hazard.
 The project has conducted Environmental Impact Assessment
 The project might have impact on the coastal ecosystem and bio-diversity which
are required to be addressed properly

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Climate Change Implication of the Project
 The project has not conducted any analysis on the probable climate change
impact on the project component.
 There is no specific measures like climate risk assessment, climate proofing
and climate adaptation under the project.
 The road is not resilient to sea erosion, climate change and cyclone
hazards.
 There are no specific actions to mitigate the climate change addressed in
the Project Documents.

Disaster Resilience (DRR) Implication of the Project


 The geo-textile technology using for dam is not permanent solution to coastal
erosion which requires further study.
 Hill cutting by the project creates another secondary disaster like: land slide.
 There is no specific issues mentioned to prevent probable future disaster in the
project document.

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 The marine drive road may be re-designed considering
climate change prediction and comparing with international
standard marine drive roads.
 Marine drive attracts tourists. So toll may be introduced for
the road user to create fund for proper maintenance of the
road.
 The road alignment did not consider the natural hazards -thus
it is very unsustainable;
 Collection of sand from sea beach for road protection works
affecting the environment, which should be avoided;
 To protect the road from sea water wave proper protection
work should be done on the basis of analysis considering the
climate change prediction.

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Construction of Khulna-Mongla Port Rail Line Including Feasibility Study
(July 2010 – June 2014)

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Poverty Reduction Implication of the Project
 Short-term and long term; small and medium scale employment opportunities might
be created, would help the project to contribute in poverty reduction.
 The project has not been done any study to address Structural Poverty.
 Railway is a safe and cost effective mode of transport especially for women and
children which will enhance accessibility of that specific group.
 The project is expected to create the opportunities to increase non-farm activities in
the particular areas.
 The project will create an easy access to institutions, market place and service
center that will enable the people’s mobility towards economic development.
 The project does not have any plan or option to protect economic assets of the poor.
The project has land acquisition activity which required to be justified properly.
 The railway line will facilitate the easy access to natural resources or common
resources.
 The proposal & alignment of the rail line was made very quickly with very limited
participation with the community people;

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Sustainable Environment Implication of the Project
 The DPP of the project mentioned that proper action will be taken in
determining the generic indicators in relation to sustainable environment
and Environmental Impact Assessment, however there is a provision for
consultant (Environmental Specialist) in the feasibility study and
construction supervision services.
 The project aimed to enhance the development of tourism in the southern
part of Bangladesh especially in Sundarban, which may stake the bio-
diversity of this biggest mangrove forest in the world.
 Although the proposed railway line is wetland area, no plan has been made
to conserve forest resources, local species, biodiversity, agricultural land
and other wetland resources.
 The proposed alignment does not address environmental degradation and
ecosystem disruption issues.
 Project does not have any provision for Natural Resource Management and
Use.

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Climate Change Implication of the Project
 The Khulna-Mongla Railway construction project does not address climate
change impact analysis properly.
 There is no specific measures like climate risk assessment, climate proofing
and climate adaptation have been taken under the project.
 The design of the railway is not considered the probable variation in the water
level due to the impact of climate change.
 There are no specific measures due to climate mitigation in the Project
Documents.
Disaster Resilience (DRR) Implication of the Project
 The design of the railway is not considered the disaster and other environmental
degradation issues.
 Specific lesion from past disaster has not been considered during project
design.
 There is no specific issues mention to prevent probable future disaster in the
project documents.

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 Probable environmental impact especially the impact on natural
ecosystem due to the construction of rail line should be taken
effectively.
 The coordination with Mongla port authority and other port attached
organizations to establish infrastructure and logistics for
containerized cargo movement is necessary.
 During designing the railway line Environmental, Climate and
disaster issues should be considered more vigorously in the project
as well as an in depth feasibility study report.
 The design of the railway track should be environment friendly, and
socio-economic viable. The study should address all these issues
very carefully.
 Incorporation of the local people especially the poor agricultural
households is critical to ensure poverty reduction through
constructing the proposed rail line.

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Char Development and Settlement Project (CDSP) -IV
(Jan 2011 – Dec 2016)

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Rehabilitation of BWDB Infrastructures Damaged by Cyclone Aila in Coastal Area
(South-western zone) (July 2010 – June 2013)

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National Agriculture Technology Project (NATP)
(July 2007 – June 2013)

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Production, Storage and Distribution of Quality Rice, Wheat and Jute Seeds at
Farmers Level (July 2007 – June 2012)

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Sundarbans Environmental and Livelihood Security (SEALS)
(October 2010-December 2014)

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 Absence of Poverty-Environment-Climate-Disaster linkage with
development programmes obstructing sustainable development initiatives;
 Majority of the projects do not benefit the poor people and in most cases
increase vulnerability
 Lack of integration of the poor and disadvantaged people in the project
implementation increase the structural poverty and escalated the gap
among rich and poor;
 Natural resources management is not considered properly within most of
the development projects;
 Lack of consideration of environmental issues ultimately damages the
natural ecosystem and livelihood of the poor;
 Failure of development initiatives without considering poverty-
environment-climate-disaster issues induce secondary disaster;
 Lack of investment in the research and development of adaptation and
mitigation of disaster and climate change reduce the income of the poor and
increase vulnerability.

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 Coordination among different sectors
 Implement the findings of concerned project
during project implementation period
 Advocacy
 Lack of evidence and scientific knowledge exists
 Knowledge gap among stakeholders
 Time constraints
 Quality feedback from the members

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Objective:
 To provide a framework of Indicators to be used in
development project design, approval, implementation,
monitoring and evaluation process
Process:
 A draft concept paper on ‘Pro-poor, environment friendly,
low emission, climate resilient development’
 7 FGDs (Focussed Group Discussion) with various
stakeholders in the Government are targeted
 1 FGD held with professionals in IMED and BBS
 The draft IF sent to Solution Exchange for gathering
comments

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 Coordination among different sectors
 Time constraints

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Objective:
 To review the financial management system and the
institutional arrangements to understand the allocation and
spending of climate change related finances
Process:
• The CPEIR study team prepared and presented First Draft
Report in the validation workshop with high level
stakeholders in March 2012
• PECM team held consultation in the 3 CHT Districts and
feedback incorporated in the CPEIR
• Next step is to introduce a “Climate Budget Code” in
Classification Chart for tracking climate change expenditure
• GED has sent DO letter to Finance Division to formulate a
Climate Fiscal Framework; FD has formed a committee

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 The inclusion of a Climate Change functional code
in the reviewed Chart of Accounts
 Continued strengthening of financial management
capacity in accounting and budgeting at central and
local level
 Development of financial systems to support more
in-depth analysis of budgets and expenditure
 Develop means to identify climate actions more
explicitly and consistently in Ministry Budget
Frameworks
 Investigate specialisation of purpose for each of the
financial delivery mechanisms currently in operation
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• Institutional leader, MoEF, should be strengthened &
should be given responsibility for coordinating all
activities related to climate change, including
adaptation & mitigation.
• Climate Change Unit to be strengthened to provide
secretarial support to BCCTF & BCCRF for their
smooth functioning
• Institutions should give special emphasis on
vulnerable targeted & hot-spot based projects. Given
high interface with CC impacts, special importance
should be given to water resources & coastal
infrastructure
• Parliamentary Standing Committee needs to be legally
empowered to oversee activities related to Climate
Change
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 Focus on strengthening the ADP and MTBF
processes as a means to balance and co-ordinate
policy.
 The Budget Management Committees of line
ministries should be strengthened with expertise in
the area of CC activities.
 Focus on balancing sector policies with overall
strategy

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 Build climate impacts into the existing vulnerability
mapping database used for safety net programs.
 Conduct empirical assessments of household and
private sector spending on climate change related
activities.
 Revisit each funding modalities in light of criteria such
as scaling up, target group, sustainability, democratic
representation and accountability in channeling
climate finance to beneficiaries.
 Upazila Parishads, district administrative offices and
NGOs in providing monitoring and technical support to
Unions Parishads.
 Appraise the power and capacity necessary for local
elected bodies to support the implementation of
climate change programs in sustainable manner.
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 Focus on strengthening the ADP and MTBF
processes as a means to balance and co-ordinate
policy.
 The Budget Management Committees of line
ministries should be strengthened with expertise in
the area of CC activities.
 Focus on balancing sector policies with overall
strategy

9/5/2018 68
 Build climate impacts into the existing vulnerability
mapping database used for safety net programs.
 Conduct empirical assessments of household and
private sector spending on climate change related
activities.
 Revisit each funding modalities in light of criteria such
as scaling up, target group, sustainability, democratic
representation and accountability in channeling
climate finance to beneficiaries.
 Upazila Parishads, district administrative offices and
NGOs in providing monitoring and technical support to
Unions Parishads.
 Appraise the power and capacity necessary for local
elected bodies to support the implementation of
climate change programs in sustainable manner.
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 Coordination among different sectors
 Huge budget code analysis

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Objectives:
 To formulate climate fiscal framework for
the local government in Bangladesh.
Rationale:
 Identifying how climate change policies
developed at the national level are
translated into practical activities at the
local level.

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1. Climate change policies/plans of Bangladesh
2. Political make up and structure of LG administration (different tiers)
3. Legislations and Acts on decentralization
4. Local government mandates and functions
5. National policies and guidelines for local government related to climate
change (or climate-sensitive sectors)
6. Reports on current local government and climate-related programmes or
projects
7. Budget allocations to the Local Government through analysis of current
and past 5 national budgets
8. Background information including financial reports on 1) 2 Upazila
Parishads and 4 Union Parishads
9. Community Risk Assessment and RRAP’s available at pilot unions

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Objective:
 To increase the PEC inclusive development project design and approval
skills of the public sector planning professionals
Process:
• Training Needs Assessment (TNA)
• A training module is developed (following a TNA)
• 2 batches training completed on “Basic Training on Poverty environment
Climate Nexus
• Revised Module based on recommendations from participants
• 5 batches training completed on ‘P Poverty, Environment and Climate
Change and Disaster Inclusive Development Project Design’
• Total 191 Public Sector Planning Professionals have been trained
• An e-network established
• The participants ranged from Ministries, Planning Commission, IMED and
Agencies

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Figure- 01: Gender Representation of the Trained Public Sector Professionals
Female Male

100
87 90 85
80
80 75

60

40

13 20 25
10 15
20

0
Planning Commission Ministry IMED Agencies and Others
Economic Cadre General Cadre Total

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• The duration of the training might be extended
• Include Member of Planning
Commission/Ministers/MPs/Policy makers in the
training course as a guest or speakers to keep them
on the PECD loop
• Refresher course might be organized
• Daily allowance might be increased
• Logistic support might be increased for the
participants.

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 Communication with Ministries/Division/Agencies
 Hiring Resource Persons
 Transportation to Venue
 Category of Participation with diversified background
 Motivation to learning
 Time constraints
 Accountability and Authority Gap
 Natural Disaster

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 Mid-Term Evaluation was undertaken during the last year
of the project.
 Evaluation criteria is based on relevance,
effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability, and to
focus on how things might be done better in the future
(e.g., by a follow-on project).
 PECM is a significant and successful USD 1.0 million,
3¼ year project (2010-13).
 PECM’s achievement will sustain beyond the end of the
project, as PECM has laid the foundations across a
broad spectrum for the successful mainstreaming of PEC
nexus issues throughout government’s development
programmes.

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The key conclusions of the project are as follows-

1. Were the right things done?


2. Were things done right?
3. Were things done well?
4. Will the benefits of the project sustain?
5. How could things be done better?

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1. Were the right things done?

 PECM is highly relevant to the Government of


Bangladesh’s policies and priorities, UNDP policies and
global priorities, and the needs of the citizens of
Bangladesh – especially those most likely to be
affected by climate change.
 The PECM Project is highly relevant. It is an important and
timely way to assist the Government of Bangladesh to
strengthen its policies and planning systems.

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2. Were things done well?
 PECM is an efficient and cost-effective project which should
give good value for money.
3. Will the benefits of the project sustain?
 Many achievements of the project will sustain but without
further support, the potential for transformational and sustained
change is unlikely to be realized. To achieve this, a follow-on
project will be needed to consolidate the gains made and build
a constituency for change.
4. How could things be done better?
 The evaluation team recommends that Government of
Bangladesh, UNDP and PEI should consider designing a
follow-on project. The indicative cost would be US$ 5 million
over four years

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 PECM is an efficient and cost-effective project which
should give good value for money
 PECM’s achievement will sustain beyond the end of the
project, as PECM has laid the foundations across a broad
spectrum for the successful mainstreaming of PEC nexus
issues throughout government’s development
programmes.
 Government of Bangladesh, UNDP and PEI should
consider designing a follow-on project. It would and
would aim fully and sustainably to mainstream PEC
issues in Bangladesh’s development systems and
development programme.

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 DPP/TPP (format) and the Guideline are revised (and
improved) and incorporated PEC and disaster issues; A
Manual is developed for all public sector planning
professionals
 PEC Links Delta Plan and Social Protection Strategy
 Two hundred (200) more planning professionals targeted
under the training program by September 2013
 PEC Curriculum is incorporated in the BCS (Economic
Cadre) Academy Curriculum
 A Climate Fiscal Framework and subsequent budget code
is introduced
 Piloting of Local Climate Fiscal Framework completed and
link with LGD established
 GoB budget allocation increased in PECM issues

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 DPP/TPP (format) and the Guideline are revised (and
improved) and incorporated PEC and disaster issues;
 A Manual is developed for all public sector planning
professionals
 PEC Links are incorporated in National Sustainable
Development Strategy (NSDS) and Delta Plan
 Two hundred (200) Planning Professionals targeted under
the training program by 2012
 PEC Curriculum is incorporated in the BCS (Economic
Cadre) Academy Curriculum
 A Climate Fiscal Framework and subsequent budget
code is introduced
 GoB budget allocation increased in PECM issues

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 An Advocacy Strategy for Mainstreaming
 A Capacity Building Strategy
 Linkages with selected UNDP programmes
 A successful conclusion of the PECM project in Sept
2013 is expected to be followed by stepping into
Second Phase
 The design of 2nd Phase will fully engage GED and
stakeholders across the spectrum in a participatory
manner.

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