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Chapter 2

Color and Directional Effects of Lighting


Introduction In layered lighting plans, an interior
designer must coordinate the intensity
and directional effects from all the light
sources

Colors, textures, shapes, forms, and


size are affected by the intensity and
directional qualities of light sources

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Lamps and Color
The eye can detect more
than five million colors

Perception is affected by
the source of light

Wavelengths of daylight
vary according to various
atmospheric conditions

Lamp manufacturers
provide chromaticity
ratings and the color-
rendering index (CRI)
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Chromaticity
Chromaticity, or color
temperature, of a light source
helps to create the
atmosphere of a space and
often reflects the quality of the
interior

The warmer the apparent color


of a light source, the lower the
number of kelvins (K) will be

International Commission on
Illumination or Commission
Internationale de l’Eclairage
(CIE), developed a diagram
that represents correlated color
temperature (CCT)

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Chromaticity An interior that has a warm glow will
have a relatively low chromaticity rating
while an interior that appears to be cool
and bright will have a relatively high
chromaticity rating

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Color Rendering
Index

Measures how faithfully a light


source reveals the true colors
of objects

General Electric chart


demonstrates the relationship
between chromaticity in kelvins
and the CRI

Initial lumens is the light


output when the luminaire is
first installed

Mean lumens is the average


over the life of the lamp

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Directional Effects of An interior designer must develop a plan
Lighting that maximizes the positive attributes of
brightness and that controls glare

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Brightness and
Glare
Brightness - interaction
between an illumination
level and the amount of
light reflected off various
surfaces, known as
reflectance

Light level or
illuminance that falls on a
surface can be measured
in foot-candles, or lux
(lx)

Perceived brightness is
affected by the physical
condition of the eyes

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Glare

Direct glare
Indirect glare
Discomfort and disability
glare

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Controlling Glare

Elements in a luminaire,
such as a shade, baffle,
louver, or a lens, can
reduce glare

Exterior devices, such


as awnings or roof
overhangs, can also
reduce brightness from
sunlight

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Reflectance, Optical
Control, and
Transmission

Reflectance of a surface or
object involves examining
the angles of incidence
and reflection

Changing the angle of the


light source affects the
angle of reflection

Interreflection occurs
when light is contained
within a structure and is
continuously reflected from
its surfaces

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Reflectance, Optical
Control, and
Transmission
Specular reflectance:
all the falling light is
reflected

Semispecular
reflectance: most of the
light is reflected

Diffused reflectance:
light is scattered at a
variety of angles

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Reflectance, Optical
Control, and
Transmission
Reflector lamps have an
optical system designed
within the lamp to control
light

Transmission: the
passage of light through a
material

Three types of
transmission: direct,
diffused, and mixed

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Color, Directional
Effects, and LEED
Certification

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Summary

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Summary

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Key Terms

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