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FORMAL VOCUBALARY OF

ARCHITECTURE

Submitted by:
Ravi Mistry
Ronak Rathod
Pooja Padhy
Parth Sohagiya
Ayushi Saliya

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
ARCHITECTURE
• Architecture can be both an art, a science, a
process and a result, and both an idea and a
reality.

• The art or practice of designing and


constructing buildings.

• The art and science of designing buildings and


some non-building structures.

• The style of design and method of


construction of buildings and other physical
structures.

• A unifying or coherent form or structure.

• Some types of architecture are as follows:


1. Contemporary architecture.
2. Vernacular architecture.
3. Organic architecture.
4. Green architecture.
PRESENTATION
LITERATURE CASE STUDY THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE
URBAN DESIGN SEM - 8
PROJECT
FORMAL TITLE
VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
• Landscape architecture is the design of outdoor areas, landmarks, and structures
to achieve environmental, social- behavioural or aesthetic outcomes.

• the branch of architecture dealing with the arrangement of land and buildings
for human use and enjoyment.

• Design activity, from the


macro-level (urban
design, landscape
architecture) to the micro-
level (construction details
and furniture).
• It involves the systematic
investigation of existing
social, ecological, and soil
conditions and processes in
the landscape, and the
design of interventions that
will produce the desired
outcome.

PRESENTATION
LITERATURE CASE STUDY THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE
URBAN DESIGN SEM - 8
PROJECT
FORMAL TITLE
VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE
• Architecture that seeks to minimize the
negative environmental impact of buildings
by efficiency and moderation in the use of
materials, energy and development space
and the ecosystem at large.

• To satisfy the contemporary ethos a building


should be constructed in a manner which is
environmentally friendly in terms of the
production of its materials, its impact upon
the natural and built environment of its
surrounding area and the demands that it
makes upon non- sustainable power sources
for heating, cooling, water and waste
management and lighting.

• It is managed in such a way as to employ


design techniques which minimize
environmental degradation and make use
of low-impact materials and energy sources.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
FUNCTIONAL
• Designed to be practical and useful, rather
than attractive.

• In relation to buildings, architecture has to


do with the planning, designing and
constructing form, space and ambience
that reflect functional, technical, social,
environmental, and aesthetic considerations

STRUCTURALISM
• An anthropological theory that there are
unobservable social structures that generate
observable social phenomena.

• Among the philosophies that have


influenced modern architects and their
approach to building design are rationalism,
empiricism, structuralism, post structuralism,
and phenomenology.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
REPLICATION
• the act of making copies

• It is widely assumed that architectural


success was the product of a process
of trial and error, with progressively less
trial and more replication as the results
of the process proved increasingly
satisfactorily.

DESIGN
• the act of working out the form of
something.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
AESTHETICS
• The branch of philosophy dealing with
beauty and taste

• With the emerging knowledge in


scientific fields and the rise of new
materials and technology, architecture
and engineering began to separate,
and the architect began to
concentrate on aesthetics and the
humanist aspects, often at the expend.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
FACTORS AFFECTING DESIGN
• LIGHT

• WATER

• MATERIAL

• LANDSCAPE

• NATURE

• CONTEXT

• COLOUR

• FUNCTION

• ORIENTATION
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
PROJECT :- Le Grande Louvre

ARCHITECT :- I.M. Pei

TIME DURATION :- 1989

LOCATION :- PARIS, FRANCE

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Pei’s design of the Louvre addition implemented a
large glass and steel pyramid that is surrounded by
three smaller triangles that provide light to the
space below Court Napoleon.
• For Pei, the glass pyramid provided a symbolic
entry that had historical and figural importance
that reinforced the main entry.

The monumental appearance


of the glass and steel pyramid
fixed in the middle of the court
provides a central focal point
that compliments the scale and
design of the Louvre.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
THIS PRYMIDS ARE THE ONLY WAY TO ACESS OF LIGHT TO MUSEUM.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• The scale of the
large pyramid,
which is
designed to the
same
proportions of
the famous
pyramid of Giza.
The
transparency of
glass justifying
the night view.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
ARCHITECT :- Frank Lloyd Wright
LOCATION :- USA WATER AS A FACTOR
PROJECT YEAR :- 1939

The waterfall had been the family's


retreat for fifteen years and when
they commissioned Wright to design
the house they envisioned one across
from the waterfall, so that they could
have it in their view.

Instead, Wright integrated the design


of the house with the waterfall itself,
placing it right on top of it to make it
a part of the Kaufmanns' lives.

The house was meant to compliment


its site while still competing with the
drama of the falls and their endless
sounds of crashing water.

The power of the falls is always felt,


not visually but through sound, as the
breaking water could constantly be
heard throughout the entire house.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
SITE PLAN

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
ELEVATION
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Frank Lloyd Wright told them
that he wanted them to live
with the waterfalls, to make
them part of their everyday
life, and not just to look at
them now and then.

Breaking water could


constantly be heard
throughout the entire house.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
NATURE’S HOUSE
Architects – Junes Kino
NATURE AS A FACTOR
architect and design
Location - Bangkok
• The house is designed to
connect people to the nature.

• The idea of design determines


auspicious and inauspicious
positions for the house and in
order to promote a sense of
nature, inauspicious positions
are then substituted by water.

• A bridge is appointed to
connect private space and
public space which is divided
by natural element water.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Building materials are a combination of natural materials wood, rock
and natural finishing products in order to create the feeling of
natural living.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• The ceiling is designed to be very thin like paper
and designed to let natural light penetrates
through during the day and disperse light to all
areas.
• At night artificial lights from lamps and lanterns are
diffused to the exterior.
• The open space between the ceiling and walls will
control lighting inside the room during day and
night.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
COLOUR
• Ivanhoe Grammar Senior Years & Science Centre in Doreen
• Institutional Architecture in Melbourne, Victoria, Australian – design by
McBride Charles Ryan, architects
• 29 Mar 2017
• Architects: McBride Charles Ryan

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• McBride Charles Ryan of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, has been
announced as the winner of the WAN Colour in Architecture Award
2016 for their Ivanhoe Grammar Senior Years & Science Centre, a
project that places a vibrant and engaging use of colour at the heart
of the design concept.
• The WAN Colour in Architecture Award celebrates projects that
harness colour to dramatically transform a building or enhance
the experience for its users and community.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• The brief for this new school building included a variety of
general learning areas, provision for the senior year teachers
and a science centre.
• The circular shaped plan had an appropriate civic quality
based on the school’s original masterplan. However, rather
repeating the circular pattern inside, the designers chose to
use geometry and colour to define the central courtyards,
• light wells and learning spaces. The sharp angles and vivid
colours of the interior form a dramatic contrast with the
round form and muted tones of the drum-like outer
structure.
• At key entry points, the drum is ‘eroded’ to reveal the
wonders of science and learning expressed through this
vibrant design. Per was delighted by the surprise of the
coloured inner spaces as revealed through these openings.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Glass Lake House
Architect - Rosenow | Peterson Design

• This amazing glass wall house as a


reflection of its environment and an ode to
modern architectural design.
• Perched on a grassy hilltop here in the
pastoral Midwest
• The Edgewater residence in prior lake,
Minnesota features a palette of glass, steel,
stone and wood which combine to form
this strong, striking silhouette amidst the
rolling landscape.
• Interiors of this open concept home are
bright and spacious, with views of and
direct access to outdoor entertaining
areas. Surrounded by pastoral scenery and
the water’s edge always within sight,
• This elegant lake house both complements
nature, and stands out on its own
architectural merit.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Taking a cue from its surroundings, the • A stone fireplace warms up
main living area is a bright space with this vast, open space
an alfresco feel, thanks to the creating an earthy focal point
expansive glass facades that separate and a warm, inviting hub for
it from nature and the waterfront. after-dinner conversation and
company late into the night.
• A door (glass, of course!) offers views
of and direct access to an outdoor
patio
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Continuing past the dining area, a
contemporary kitchen that dished • We love how wood is integrated
up the latest in fixtures and finishes into this den, which combines with
– chef’s appliances, marble- the lower ceiling height, and
topped island, comfortable yet contemporary
• modern pendant lights and a furniture arrangement that lends it
shimmering tile backsplash, all a cozy, intimate feel
facing a wall of glass and the lush
scenery beyond.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Project Case Study: Identifying innovative passive design
: strategies
Location Nanyang Technological University, School of Art Media and
: Design, Singapore
Architect Designed by CPG
: Consultants
Introduction
• Nanyang Technological University is one of the largest public universities in Singapore
which boasts a 200 hectare campus.
• Each school has their own building on the campus ground. One of the new building
inside the campus ground was built for its School of Art, Design and Media.

Green Certification
Nanyang Technological
University’s School of Art, Design and
Media achieved the Green Mark Platinum
Award from the Building and Construction
Authority for adopting best practices in
environmental sustainability (Green Mark). View of the stairs leading up to the open courtyard.
Entrance to the building from the courtyard can be seen.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Benefits from Site Context :
• The consultants took a lot of measures to
design this building in accordance with the
natural sun orientation.
• This building is located in the housing area
with a proper development from the
singapore’s government.
• As it is situated far from the main city, there is
no natural shading from the surrounding
building except for the location natural
vegetation.
• Thus, the consultants built this building with
a proper orientation by placing the facades
facing north and south to minimize solar
Site Plan Black Box :
gain. Blue Box :
Red Box : Nanyang
House /
• After achieving the right orientation for Nanyang Technological
Residential
building, the facade is fixed with glass curtain Technological University School
Area
Universtiy of Art, Design and
walls.
Campus Media
• The purpose of the green roof is to bring out
the aesthetic value of the building

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Absorb
Absorb Singapore's
Singapore's
Intense Sun
Intense Sun

Beauty to the
users and
surrounding

Building Material
which is glass
curtain that allows
natural lighting to
FORMAL VOCUBALARY PRESENTATION enter the building.
THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Grass turf A l mond Shape C o u r ty a r d

• The grass turf helps to absorb Singapore’s • The courtyard expands access to
intense sun which decreases the daylight and cooling effect.
temperature of the air surrounding the
university. • It provides natural light into interior
spaces as well as in providing cooling
• Moreover, thus eco-friendly attribute properties from the water attributes
enhances the outdoor gathering spaces exuding a serene environment and
of the university. emanating a refreshing breeze that cools
the courtyard.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
FORMAL VOCUBALARY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
GESTALT THEORY

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
VISUAL PERCEPTION AND GESTALT
PSYCHOLOGY
• It is a known fact today that human mind is programmed to search for meaning in all
the sensory information that is sent to it.
• This characteristic evolved with the survival instinct of our ancestors, who had to
watch out for any kind of visual information in the environment for protecting
themselves and for finding food.
• How the mind interprets forms and patterns that are presented to it, or how visual
information is perceived, is explained by Gestalt psychology in 1930’s.
• The word gestalt is a German original word, which means “the shape of an entity’s
complete form” (shortly it means shape). It states that there are innate mental laws
that which determined the way we perceive objects. Shortly, it maintains that:
• when a person is faced with unknown visual information, the mind organizes the
data according to certain innate (built-in) preferences, and because of that human
beings see objects in entirety before perceiving their individual parts.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Therefore when we see a figure, we don’t see or perceive its
individual parts first, but we see the complete figure in its entirety.

• We see whole forms instead of just a collection of simple lines and


curves. Therefore the motto of gestalt theory says that “the whole is
greater than the sum of its parts”.

• It means that the essence of a whole could not be explained by


seeing just the parts of the whole.

Gestalt theory further states that the wholes are structured and organized according to
grouping principles, which are as follows:

Gestalt Principles of Visual Perception


a. Figure and Ground
b. Proximity
c. Similarity
d. Closure
e. Symmetry
f. Continuity
g. Simplicity
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
FIGURE AND GROUND
• Figure and ground principle states that the eye distinguishes an object from its
surrounding area.

• For this reason, a form or a shape is perceived as a figure, while the surrounding
area is perceived as the ground (background).

• According to that, a shape seen in the context of an enclosing shape will be


interpreted as a form against a background, with the mind choosing which is
which. The figure is seen to be at the front and the focus at any moment is the
figure.

• The contrast between the object and its


surrounding area, such as dark and light or
black and white, enhances our vision of
figure ground.

• It reminds us that what we place into a


composition is as important as what we do
not place.

• The emptiness of what we do not place


also acts as an input to our composition.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Figure and ground principle states that the eye distinguishes an object from its
surrounding area.

• The famous example for explaining figure-ground principle is the figure below,
depicting both a vase and two profiles of human face.

• Depending on whether the white or black colour is observed as the figure, the mind
interprets the picture either as a vase (black) or two human faces (white).

• It is difficult (or impossible according to Gestalt theory) to see the two figures at the
same time. The mind has the tendency to choose which one to see at one time.

Figure and ground: A vase or


two human figures
• Figure and ground: Either the white chess pieces or the black human figures in
between (left); Either white horses and knights in black background is seen or black
horses and knights in white background (right)

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• Figure and ground: • The contrast between the
Either black birds in object and its surrounding
area, such as dark and light
white background or or black and white,
white birds in black enhances our vision of
background. figure ground.

• It reminds us that
what we place into
a composition is as
• Figure and Ground: facade elements and the
important as what
cavities between them creating figure ground
we do not place.
affect.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Proximity
• Proximity principle states that objects that are near or close to each other are
perceived as a group. For example in the figure below, there are 36 dots
altogether, but they are perceived as three separate columns of dots. This
principle is used in design to emphasize the connectedness of figures or
objects.

• Proximity of windows make them perceived in groups


of two

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Similarity
• Similarity principle states that items that are similar to each other are perceived as
a group. If there is an assortment of objects, we perceptually group the similar
ones together. Similarity can occur in terms of shape, colour, texture or other
qualities. For example in the figure below, there are 36 dots altogether, which are
at equal distance from one another forming a square. 18 of them are dark shaded
and 18 of them are white shaded. In this formation we perceive the white circles
to be grouped together and dark circles to be grouped together, forming six
horizontal lines.

Similarity: Dark colored windows are read as a group and light colored window
panes are read as another group, forming horizontal lines.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Closure
• Closure principle states that people perceive objects such as shapes, letters, pictures
etc., as being whole when they are not complete. This means that when the parts of
a whole picture are missing, our perception fills in the visual gap. Research has
demonstrated that the reason of completing a regular figure that is not actually
complete is for the purpose of regulating the surrounding stimuli. For example in the
first figure below, there are no triangles or circles, but our minds fill in the missing
information to create shapes and images that are familiar to us. In the second figure,
there are gaps missing from the shapes, but we perceive them to be a circle and a
square. If closure principle did not exist, we would perceive them as a collection of
different lines with different angles and lengths.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Closure: China Central Television HQ, Beijing Closure also works in volumes.
Although the prism is not complete we still sense the space as a prism

Closure also works in facade articulation. Although the square of the facade is
not complete we still read it as a square

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Symmetry
• Symmetry principle states that the mind tries to see a centre point in between the
objects and tries to perceive objects as being symmetrical. Research has shown
that the mind does such a thing because it is perceptually pleasing and easy to be
able to divide objects into an even number of symmetrical parts. For this reason,
when two symmetrical elements are separate, the mind perceptually connects
them to form a familiar shape. Moreover, the similarities between symmetrical
objects facilitate grouping them to form a combined symmetrical object. For
example in the first figure below, there are 6 individual brackets, but we see them
as 3 symmetrical pairs of brackets. In the second figure, we do not see small
diamond and two irregular figures above and below it at first, but we see two
overlapping diamonds.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Symmetry:
Reconstruction
of the Parthenon
and the Taj
Mahal

Symmetry: Saint
Peter's basilica,
Vatican ; A colonial
type of house,
Raleigh, USA

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Continuity
• Continuity principle states that if the objects are aligned, they are perceived as a
group and integrated into a perceptual whole. If there is an intersection between
objects, people perceive the two objects as two single uninterrupted objects. This
happens because people have a fondness for continuous figures. For example in the
figure below, rather than seeing four separate line segments, we tend to see two
intersecting lines creating the shape of an X.

Continuity: The alignment of raised parts of the facade


element makes the raised part perceived as a group (right);
the alignment of facade elements makes the whole facade
perceived as a group (left)
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Simplicity
• Simplicity principle states that reality is organized and reduced to the simplest form
possible. People perceive the world by eliminating complexity and unfamiliarity in
order to observe a reality in its most simplistic form. This happens because the mind
tries to decrease the effort of processing visual information to a minimum in order
to be able to create meaning. For example in the figure below, we see a series of
circles rather than seeing many complicated shapes.

Simplicity: We read the form as a totality although there are different parts. We also
see continuity, proximity, similarity. Boston State Building, Boston, USA (left),
Guggenheim museum (right)

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Simplicity: We read the form as a totality although there are different parts. We also
see continuity, proximity, similarity. La Tourette Monastry .

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Gestalt in compositions:
Unfinished composition
(left), finished
composition where the
whole is dominant over
the parts (right)

As the figures grow in


size the figure-ground
relationship is read
better: Weak figure
ground (left), Stronger
figure ground (right)

Gestalt in Gestalt in
compositions: compositions:
Proximity creating Similarity creating
rhythm in unity in
composition composition

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Gestalt in compositions: figure-
ground, continuity,

Gestalt in compositions: Continuity

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• IN THE DESIGN OF THIS HOUSE SIMPLY TWO RECTANGLE USED WHICH BASED ON
GESTALT PRINCIPAL OF SIMPLICITY.
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• GESTALT PRINCIPAL OF CONTINUITY & SIMILARITY CREATED WITH
ALUMINIUM COLUM IN ELEVATION AS WELL AS THIS COLUM COMPLETE THE
RECTENGLE IN ELVATION WICH BASED ON GESTALT PRINCIPAL OF
CLOSURE.

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
• EVEN THE ELEVATION OF HOUSE SIMPLY SHOW TWO RECTANGLE WHICH ALSO
SHOW GESTALT PRINCIPAL OF SIMPLICITY
PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8
GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Salk Institute
Architect :- Louis kahn

Symmetry

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Simplicity Closure

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE
Continuity

PRESENTATION THEORY OF ARCHITETCTURE SEM - 8


GESTALT THEORY BHAGWAN MAHAVIR COLLEGE OF ARCHITECURE