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ACTION ON NCR

WHAT IS AN NON-CONFORMITY

 A nonconformity is any failure to meet a requirement. A requirement can be that of a


customer's, statutory or regulatory body, ISO 9001 or your organization's. It's a tool to put right
things that are going wrong.
TYPES OF NONCONFORMANCE.
System:
When an organization fail to follow the principles and procedures developed and documented to
achieve certain task.

Product:
When a product fail to meet the product requirements (e.g. use of wrong materials, inability to operate
on required operating conditions, dimensional variations more than defined tolerance etc.).
IDENTIFYING A NONCONFORMANCE

 Work that fails to meet specified tolerances as established in


project specifications.
 When the testing and inspection plan is not followed as
agreed.
 A failure to achieve legal or statutory requirement.
 Work that was not built as indicated in approved drawings.
 Work that is being performed using non-approved methods or
standards.
Examples form Our Project
REPORTING OF AN NCR
 There are three parts to a well-documented nonconformity.

1. The statement of nonconformity.

2. A record of the requirement against which nonconformity is detected.

3. The audit evidence to support auditor findings.

• If there is NO audit evidence- there is NO nonconformity

• If there is an evidence – it must be documented as a nonconformity, instead of being softened with another
classifications (e.g. “observations, opportunities for improvement, recommendations, etc. )

• In the longer term, neither the organization, its customers, nor the certification body benefit by the use of softer
classifications, as the risks the nonconformity being given a lower priority for corrective action.
 Opportunity for Improvement
• A process/activity/document that, while currently conforming, could be improved to bring benefits to client.

 Observation
• An area of concern, a process, a document, or an activity that is currently conforming that may if not improved,
result in a nonconforming system, product or services.

 The final and most important part of a nonconformity is the writing of a statement of nonconformity. The
statement of nonconformity drive the cause analysis, correction and corrective action by the organization, so it
needs to be precise.
WHY NCR ?
• Finding the true cause(s) of events

• Identifying and Implementing corrective actions

• Assessing the effectiveness of corrective actions

• Preventing recurrence of the events


A Cause ...

Is a set of circumstances or conditions that


Allows a condition to exist or an event to happen, or

Makes a condition exist or an event happen.


The Critical Five
1. Direct Cause: The cause that directly resulted in the event.(The first cause in the chain.)

2. Contributing Cause: The cause(s) that contributed to an event but, by itself, would not have
caused the event. (The causes after the direct cause.)

3. Root Cause: The fundamental reason for an event, which if corrected, would prevent
recurrence. (The last cause in the chain.)

4. Specific Corrective Action: Action(s) taken to correct or improve conditions noted in the
event, by changing the direct cause or the direct cause and the effect.

5. Preventive Corrective Action: Action(s) taken that prevent recurrence of the condition noted
in the event. (Preventive actions must directly address the root and contributing causes to be
effective.)
The process requires complete honesty and no predetermined
assumptions.

Follow the Data!!! Don't try to lead it.


• Improper instructions
• Improper tools
• Improper training
Cop-out, “Operator error”. Why do people not
comply?
Just Keep Asking
Causes
 Direct Cause: The cause that directly resulted in an event. (The first cause in the
chain.)This is the answer to your first question (your problem statement).

 Contributing Cause: The cause that contributed to an event but, by itself, would not
have caused the event (The causes after the direct cause).Note: For a simple
problem there may not be any contributing causes.

 Root Cause: The fundamental reason for an event, which if corrected, would
prevent recurrence (The last cause in the chain).
CORRECTIVE ACTION:
A set of planned activities (actions)implemented for the sole purpose of
permanently resolving the problem.

Corrective Action

Specific Preventive Systemic


Specific Corrective Action

Action(s) taken to correct the direct cause.(Corrects or


improves the condition noted in the event, by changing
the direct cause, or the direct cause and the effect.)
Preventive Corrective Action
Action(s) taken that prevent recurrence of the condition noted
in the event(Preventive actions must directly address the root
and contributing causes to insure effectiveness.)

Preventive corrective actions focus on changing the root cause and


any contributing cause(s).
You probably won’t get a 100% effective fix at just one point (the root
cause).
You often have to consider two or more contributing causes to ensure
the chain is broken
Systemic Corrective Action

Action(s) taken that address the failure in the quality


system that allowed the event to occur.
Specific Action Test

Test the specific solutions to ensure they are valid:

 Do the corrective actions eliminate or control the direct cause?


 Are the results desirable?
 Will the action immediately contain the problem and
 Immediately prevent it from recurring?
Preventive Action Test
Test the proposed preventive actions by asking:

If these preventive corrective actions were in place, would the event


have occurred ?
Do the preventive corrective actions lower the risk factor of the event to
an acceptable level?
Follow - Up

A review must be conducted in sufficient detail to assess whether the corrective


actions that have been implemented are effective as implemented and are truly
preventing recurrence of the event.
Did Corrective Actions Work?
Some additional things to consider:

 If corrective action implemented differs from proposed, find out why. THE CHANGE
MAY BE VALID!

 If better or alternate corrective actions were implemented, document the changes.

 Periodic checks may be necessary to be sure the corrective actions are still in place
and continue to be effective.
ROJECT NCRs IN A GLANCE

NCR Internal NCR


Approved 41 5
Approved with 4 0
comments
For approval 1 2
Reject 12 0
Open 14 33
Total 72 40

* As of 30-Mar-2019
CASE STUDY
AN ACTUAL NCR
CRME-AJPE-GPS-NCR-004
(Different approach on same NCR)
WHAT WE SHALL DO

 RESPONSE TIME : Within the first week from the issue of the NCR (First proposal )

 REPAIR & USE : Only with approval of customer

 DATA COLLECTION : By following the data.


APPROACH -1
 FINDING:Root gap is 5-10 mm Oversize

CASE STUDY RESPONSE:

 DIRECT CAUSE: Fabricator error

 CONTRIBUTING CAUSE: NOT APPLICABLE

 ROOT CAUSE: NOT APPLICABLE

 SPECIFIC ACTION/CONTAINMENT: Fabricator not allowed to fabricate any more

 PREVENTIVE ACTION: NOT APPLICABLE


APPROACH -2

 FINDING:Root gap is 5-10 mm Oversize

CASE STUDY RESPONSE:

 DIRECT CAUSE: Edge preparation was wrong.

 CONTRIBUTING CAUSE: Tools used, fabricator training, workmanship, lack of


knowledge in buttering procedure.

 ROOT CAUSE: Cumulative error in edge preparation leads to higher root gap.
APPROACH -2
SPECIFIC ACTION/CONTAINMENT: Fabricator uses root gap template to carryout further
more fabrications.

PREVENTIVE ACTION: Fabrication is reviewed by supervisor, engineering and quality


team. Determination made based on review of all inputs, inspection, fabrication, more
reference points given during cutting edge markup.

SYSTEMIC ACTION: New fabrication method need review, use buttering procedure
if root gap is found excess during fit-up stage (Before final tack welding)
Thank You