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Adverb Clause

What is an Adverb? What is a Clause? What is an Adverb Clause?

What is an Adverb?
It is a word that describes or adds to

the meaning of a verb, an adjective and another adverb, etc.

What is a Clause?
It is a group of words which form a grammatical unit and which contain a

subject and a finite verb. A clause


forms a sentence or part of a sentence and often functions as a noun, adjective or adverb.

What is an Adverb Clause?


A group of words which contains a
subject and a finite verb that

describes or adds to the meaning of a


verb, an adjective and another

adverb.

Adverb Clause can be divided into:


1. Time 2. Place 6. Purpose 7. Result

3. Manner
4. Comparison

8. Condition
9. Concession

5. Reason/ Cause

10. Contrast

1. Adverb Clause of Time


These clauses are introduced by when,

whenever, while, as, before, after, till, until, since and as soon as, during the time that,

1. Adverb Clause of Time


When he arrives, he will tell us the truth.


Mary was dancing while John was

singing.

The train left as we arrived.

1. Adverb Clause of Time

As soon as you have finished your presentation, invite your audience to ask questions.

After he had got the money, he left home


immediately. Before you can start trading, you need to register your company.

2. Adverb Clause of Place


These clauses are introduced by where,

wherever, everywhere, anywhere.

2. Adverb Clause of Place


Nobody knows where he has been to. He travels wherever he likes.

They will invest wherever they get profits.


This is the house where I used to live

during my childhood.

3. Adverb Clause of Manner


These clauses are introduced by as, as if and as though.

3. Adverb Clause of Manner


Please do as I have told you. * He cries as if he were mad. * He spoke as though he had been the boss.

* The subjunctive is used after as if and as though to


indicate unreality or improbability in the present or past.

4. Comparision

This clauses are introduced by as, than,

the + comparative

4. Comparision

The more money you invest, the more profit you get. The company pays him as much as he expected. He spends more than he earns.

5. Adverb Clause of Reason

These clauses are introduced by

because, since, and as, etc.

5. Adverb Clause of Reason

I will consider the question of jobs first because this is your highest priority.

Since the economic climate has improved, we


intend to invest in new plant and machinery.

As the weather was bad, we cancelled the picnic.

6. Adverb Clause of Purpose


These clauses are always linked with so

that, in order that, for fear that, in case,


etc.

6. Adverb Clause of Purpose


He arrived earlier so that he would not be late. They brought a lot of food for fear that they would be hungry during the trip.

She brought the credit card in case she did not have enough cash.

7. Adverb Clause of Result


These clauses are always linked with so

that, so + adj. / adv. + that and such +

a + noun + that, etc.

7. Adverb Clause of Result

Tom was so weak that he could not run.

It was such a strange story that no


one believed it.

8. Condition

The clauses are introduced by if, unless,

provided/ providing that, as long as, even if, only if, There are three basic types: Type 1, Type 2, Type 3

8. Condition

If it rains, we wont have a picnic. If I were you, I wouldnt invest money


on that company. If he hadnt sold the gold last month, he would have gotten much interests.

9. Adverb Clause of Concession


These clauses are introduced by though,

although, even though, no matter how ,

no matter what, whatever, whoever,


whichever, however, wherever,

whenever .

9. Adverb Clause of Concession

Although local advertising is cheap, it is not


as effective as national advertising.

No matter how smart they are, they are


required to do the revision.

Even though local papers are cheap to


advertise in, they dont have a wide
readership.

10. Adverb Clause of Contrast

These clauses are introduced by whereas and while

10. Adverb Clause of Contrast

We took the train, whereas Pete drove.

While Tom is a good math student,


Pam does well in English.