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SAVE LIFE AVOID ACCIDENTS

SAVING PRECIOUS LIFEHOW TO AVOID ACCIDENTS


SAFETY WHILE RIDING CYCLE SAFETY WHILE RIDING TWO WHEELERS General Safety

ACCIDENTS HAVE MANY COSTS NOT USUALLY TRACKED


LOSS OF LIFE / MANPOWER RETRAINING COSTS DAMAGED MATERIALS / EQUIPMENT LOWER MORALE LOSS OF PROFITS

CYCLING ON ROADS
Never ride with just one hand on the handle bar except when giving a signal. Keep both feet on the pedals. Do not ride more than two abreast. Use the cycle lane, where ever provided. Never follow any vehicle closely. Maintain safe distance. Do not carry anything which may affect your balance or may get tangled up with your cycle wheels or chain. USE RED REFLECTOR ON REAR OF TYRE GUARD & SADDLE USE CALF CLIP TO TO TUCK TROUSER LOWER OR TUCK INSIDE YOUR SOCKS

CYCLING ON ROADS
Avoid big and busy roads with fast moving traffic. Stop before you enter moving traffic from a driveway, a parking lot, a minor road, or from behind a parked car or bus. Go ahead only when the way is clear. Ride on the left of the road, with other traffic. If you are passing a stopped car be careful, a door may suddenly open. Obey stop signs and traffic lights, like the rest of the traffic. Before turning right at a crossing, look back over your shoulder, and give way to the traffic coming from behind. Never stop your cycle on a pedestrian crossing.

CYCLING ON ROADS
Never ride your cycle on a footpath. Never try to overtake- if you must, do it only if the driver of the vehicle in your front has permitted or signaled you to overtake. Never try to overtake a vehicle, which is in the process of taking a turn. Always follow the traffic light signals wherever you notice them. Any violation of the same is not only against the law but also dangerous to your life. Do not enter a street where you see the "No Entry" sign. Slow down at the zebra crossing- better stop if you see people crossing the road.

CYCLING ON ROADS
You should learn and understand the language of signals given by the other road users and the signal you are expected to give while riding your cycle on the road. Never stop suddenly without showing a signal. Watchfully move towards the left while slowing down, but signal your intentions to the traffic following you. Under no circumstances should you ride on the wrong side of the road or cross the road abruptly.

Common Collisions on Road


The Left Cross The Door Prize The Cross Walk Slam The Wrong-Way Wreck Red Light of Death The Left Hook The Rear End

The Left Cross


This is the most common way to get hit . A car is pulling out of a side street, parking lot, or driveway on the Left

How to avoid this collision


Get a headlight. If you're riding at night, you should absolutely use a front headlight. It's required by law, anyway

Honk. Get a loud horn and use it whenever you see a car approaching (or waiting) ahead of you and to the left
Slow down. If you can't make eye contact with the driver (especially at night), slow down so much that you're able to completely stop if you have to Ride further right. Ride far enough to the left that you won't run into any door that's opened unexpectedly. You may be wary about riding so far into the lane that cars can't pass you easily, but you're more likely to get doored by a parked car if you ride too close to it than you are to get hit from behind by a car which can clearly see you.

The Door Prize


A driver opens his door right in front of you. You run right into it if you can't stop in time. This kind of crash is more common than you might think

How to avoid this collision


Ride to the Right. Ride far enough to the right that

you won't run into any door that's opened unexpectedly. You may be wary about riding so far into the lane that cars can't pass you easily, but you're more likely to get doored by a parked car if you ride too close to it than you are to get hit from behind by a car which can clearly see you.

The Cross Walk Slam


You're riding on the sidewalk and cross the street at a crosswalk, and a car makes a left turn, right into you

How to avoid this collision

Get a headlight. If you're riding at night, you should absolutely use a front headlight. It's required by LAW Slow down. Slow down enough that you're able to completely stop if necessary Don't ride on the sidewalk in the first place. Crossing between sidewalks is a fairly dangerous maneuver. If you do it on the righthand side of the street, you risk getting slammed . If you do it on the left-hand side of the street, you risk getting slammed by a car behind you that's turning left. Sidewalk riding also makes you vulnerable to cars pulling out of parking lots or driveways. And you're threatening to pedestrians on the sidewalk, who could get hurt if you hit them

The Wrong-Way Wreck


You're riding the wrong way (against traffic, on the Righthand side of the street). A car makes a left turn from a side street, driveway, or parking lot, right into you. They didn't see you because they were looking for traffic only on their right, not on their left. They had no reason to expect that someone would be coming at them from the wrong direction.

Even worse, you could be hit by a car on the same road coming at you from straight ahead of you. They had less time to see you and take evasive action because they're approaching you faster than normal (because you're going towards them rather than away from them). And if they hit you, it's going to be much more forceful impact, for the same reason. (Both your and their velocities are combine

The Wrong-Way Wreck


How to avoid this collision
Don't ride against traffic. Ride with traffic, in the same direction Riding against traffic may seem like a good idea because you can see the cars that are passing you, but it's not. Here's why

Cars which pull out of driveways, parking lots, and cross streets (ahead of you and to the right), which are making a left onto your street, aren't expecting traffic to be coming at them from the wrong way. They won't see you, and they'll plow right into you How can you ever going to make a right turn? Cars will approach you at a much higher relative speed. If you're going 15mph, then a car passing you from behind doing 35 approaches you at a speed of only 20 (35-15). But if you're on the wrong side of the road, then the car approaches you at 50 (35+15), which is more than twice as fast

Red Light of Death


You stop to the left of a car that's already waiting at a red light or stop sign. They can't see you. When the light turns green, you move forward, and then they turn left, right into you.

Don't stop in the blind spot. . Simply stop BEHIND a car, instead of to the left of it. This makes you very visible to traffic on all sides. It's impossible for the car behind you to avoid seeing you when you're right in front of it. when you're tailing a slow-moving vehicle, ride behind it, not in its blind spot immediately to the right of it. Even if you're not passing a car on the right, you could still run into it if it turns right while you're right next to it. Give yourself enough room to brake if it turns.
The Left Hook. A car passes you and then tries to make a left turn directly in front of you, or right into you. They think you're not going very fast just because you're on a bicycle, so it never occurs to them that they can't pass you in time. Even if you have to slam on your brakes to avoid hitting them, they often won't feel they've done anything wrong. This kind of collision is very hard to avoid because you typically don't see it until the last second, and because there's nowhere for you to go when it happens

The Left Hook


A car passes you and then tries to make a left turn directly in front of you, or right into you Don't ride on the sidewalk. When you come off the sidewalk to cross the street you're invisible to motorists. You're just begging to be hit if you do this Ride to the right. Taking up the whole lane makes it harder for drivers to pass you to cut you off or turn into you. Don't feel bad about taking the lane: if motorists didn't threaten your life by turning in front of or into you or passing you too closely, then you wouldn't have to. If the lane you're in isn't wide enough for cars to pass you safely, then you should be taking the whole lane anyway. Glance in your mirror before approaching an intersection. If you don't have a handlebar mirror, get one now. Be sure to look in your mirror well before you get to the intersection. When you're actually going through an intersection

The Left Hook, Pt. 2


You're passing a slow-moving car (or even another bike) on the left, when it unexpectedly makes a left turn right into you, trying to get to a parking lot, driveway or side street

How to avoid this collision Don't pass on the left. This collision is very easy to avoid.

Just don't pass any vehicle on the left. If a car ahead of you is going only 10 mph, then you slow down, too, behind it. It will eventually start moving faster. If it doesn't, pass on the right when it's safe to do so. If several cars are stopped at a light, then you can try passing on the left cautiously. Remember that someone can fling open the passenger door unexpectedly as they exit the car. Also remember that if you pass on the left and traffic starts moving again unexpectedly, you may suffer

Look behind you before turning left. Look behind you before making a left-hand turn to make sure a bike isn't trying to pass you

The Rear End


You move Right to go around a parked car or some other obstruction in the road, and you get nailed by a car coming up from behind

How to avoid this collision. Never, ever move Right without looking behind you first. Some motorists like to pass cyclists within mere inches, so moving even a tiny bit to the left unexpectedly could put you in the path of a car. Practice holding a straight line while looking over your shoulder until you can do it perfectly. Most new cyclists tend to move right when they look behind them, which of course can be disastrous. Use a mirror. If you don't have one, get one from a bike shop Signal. Never move right without signaling. Just put your right arm straight out. Be sure to check your mirror or look behind you before signaling (since a car passing too closely can take your arm out).

The Rear End, Pt. 2


A car runs into you from behind. This is what many cyclists fear the most, but it's actually not very common, comprising only 3.8% of collisions It is one of the hardest collisions to avoid, since you're not usually looking behind you.

How to avoid this collision


Get a rear light. If you're riding at night, you absolutely should use a red rear light.

Wear a reflective vest or a safety triangle. High

quality reflective gear makes you a lot more visible even in the day time, not just at night.

Choose wide streets Choose slow streets Use back streets on weekends. The risk of riding on Friday or Saturday night is much greater than riding on other nights because some drunks could be driving around. If you do ride on a weekend night, make sure to take neighborhood streets rather than arterials.

Causes of Motorcycle Crashes

lack of basic riding skills failure to appreciate the inherent operating characteristics failure to appreciate the limitations of the motorcycle failure to use special precautions while riding failure to use defensive driving techniques. lack of specific braking and cornering skills failure to follow speed limit

A motorcycle should be selected for a comfortable fit & Requirements


Select a motorcycle that fits. A motorcyclist should be able to touch the ground with both feet when astride the vehicle.

If you will be carrying a passenger, make sure the motorcycle you select has a passenger seat as well as footrests for the passenger. Check the location of the controls. Make sure you can reach and operate them comfortably

Drive Defensively
Be especially alert at intersections because approximately 70 percent of motorcycle-vehicle collisions occur there! Watch for vehicles that may unexpectedly turn in front of you or pull out from a side street or driveway. At intersections where vision is limited by shrubbery, parked vehicles, or buildings, slow down, make doubly sure of traffic, and be prepared to react quickly. Check the rearview mirrors before changing lanes or stopping. A quick stop without checking rear traffic may result in a rear-end crash. When changing lanes, use signals and make a visual check to assure that you can change lanes safely.

Drive Defensively
Watch the road surface and traffic ahead to anticipate problems and road hazards.
Road hazards that are minor irritations for an
automobile can be a major hazard for a rider. Hazards include potholes, oil slicks, puddles, debris or other objects on the roadway, ruts, uneven pavement, and railroad tracks.

Painted roadway markings and manhole covers can be extremely slippery when wet. Go around most hazards. To do so safely, you must be able to spot such hazards from a distance. Slow down before reaching the obstacle and make sure you have enough room before changing direction. Railroad tracks should be crossed at an angle as close to 90 degrees as possible.

Drive Defensively
Maintain a safe speed consistent with driving conditions and your capabilities. Gravel on the road and slippery road surfaces can be hazardous. Avoid sudden braking or turning.
When riding in the rain, riders find they get better traction by driving in the tracks of vehicles in front of them. But avoid following too closely, and riding on painted lines and metal surfaces such as manhole covers because they offer less traction. If caught in a sudden shower while riding, pull off the highway under some shelter (e.g., overpass) and wait for the rain to stop. If you must ride in the rain, remember that conditions are most dangerous during the first few minutes of rainfall because of oil and other automobile droppings on the roadway. If possible, sit out the beginning of a rain shower.

Don't tailgate, and don't let other drivers tailgate you. Following too closely behind another vehicle may make it difficult for you to brake suddenly. Further, you won't have time to avoid road hazards and traffic situations ahead. If another vehicle is following too closely, wave it off with a hand signal or tap your brake pedal. If they continue to follow too closely, change lanes or pull off the road, and let them pass

Safety Tips
Get in gear A helmet will best protect you against injury in case of an accident. Be sure to wear it every time you ride. Get insured Make sure you and your cycle are both properly licensed before you head out. Get insured so that you and your passengers are adequately protected. Ride smartly Use your headlight, avoid other drivers' "blind spots," don't make rapid lane changes and be prepared to use your horn so you can be certain other drivers see you.

Safety Tips
Ride defensively
Three-fourths of all two-wheeler accidents involve collisions with automobiles. They happen because the driver of the car did not see you. Be aware of what the other vehicle operators are doing - or might do - when you ride. Be extra aware of drivers waiting to turn left across your path at intersections since this is the most frequent problem.

Keep your distance


Don't ever stop directly behind another vehicle. If you leave enough space, you'll be able to maneuver around the vehicle in front of you in case an approaching vehicle doesn't see you and can't stop in time.

Safety Tips
Don't drink and ride About half of fatal two-wheeler accidents involve alcohol. That is because alcohol and other drugs impair your ability to make sound judgments. So when you're drinking, let someone else do the driving. Have your bike checked regularly Follow the recommended service schedules for your bike and have all repairs made by an authorized dealer. What's more, always check your bike's tyres suspension and controls before hitting the road.

Two Wheelers Safe Driving Tips


Before starting driving, make a habit of precheck your vehicle like loosening of clutch, break, in gear or neutral, indicators, headlight (for night driving), mirrors etc. Always wear fully cover helmet it is for your safety. Avoid over speed while driving in rain, that may lead to severe accident.

Before starting you should make a sketch of your route and destination in your mind.

Two Wheelers Safe Driving Tips


While driving, you should be extra cautious about the stray animals over the road. Reduce the speed of your vehicle to 3040km during rainy days.

Extra cautious about humps on the road.


Avoid deep pools of water. You never know what could be underneath the surface

Two Wheelers Safe Driving Tips


Turn on the headlights. When driving in rain, switch on your headlights. It will increase your visibility and allow other drivers to see you from a distance. Be especially careful not to follow closely behind large buses or trucks: the spray thrown off by their rear wheels could impair your vision

Follow lane while driving and avoid jumping lanes, always use an indicator to do so

More General Tips


Avoid busy streets One of the biggest mistakes that people make when they start biking is to take the exact same routes they used when they were driving. It's usually better to take different streets with fewer and slower cars. Sure, cyclists have a right to the road, but that's a small consolation when you're dead. Consider how far you can take this strategy: If you learn your routes well, you'll find that in many cities you can travel through neighborhoods to get to most places, only crossing the busiest streets rather than traveling on them

More General Tips


Signal your turns
You're less likely to get hit when your movement doesn't take motorists by surprise. Let them know you're about to turn or move left or right by signaling with your side indicators. In case indicators are not available then use arm. Point your left arm out to move left, and point your right arm out to move right. (You might have learned an old way of signaling a right turn with your left arm, but drivers have no idea what that means, so it's useless

More General Tips


Be aware that riding with a passenger requires even more skill than riding alone. Riding with a passenger should be delayed until you have considerable solo riding time and are ready to take on the responsibility of carrying a passenger. Obtain your learner's permit or motorcycle endorsement on your driver's license before you venture onto the streets. You will be required to display the knowledge and skill needed to operate a motorcycle safely before being issued a motorcycle operator's license. Never drink and ride. Alcohol slows reflexes and greatly limits your ability to operate a motorcycle. Even a very small amount of alcohol can reduce your ability to operate a motorcycle safely. Helmet:

This is the most important piece of equipment. Safety helmets save lives by reducing the extent of head injuries in the event of a crash. Many good helmets are available. Make sure it fits comfortably and snugly, and is fastened for the ride

More General Tips


Re-think music players and mobile phones. It's more important to hear what's around you when you're biking than when you're driving. Whether you want to ride with headphones is your choice, but doing so does increase your risk. Similarly, texting or talking on a mobile phone raises the risk level. When you're mixing with car traffic, the fewer distractions the better. Also, you'll want both hands free in case you have to brake suddenly.

More General Tips


It's a good idea to signal a right turn, but it's a better idea to make your right turn at a time or place where there aren't cars behind you that could hit you while you're stopped and waiting to make that turn

More General Tips


Never ride without a certified motorcycle helmet and eye protection. Read your owner's manual thoroughly. Use it to get familiar with your motorcycle. Attend a motorcycle rider-training course. It is the best way to learn how to operate a motorcycle safely and skillfully. Rider- training classes provide unique knowledge and skills that you may not learn if a friend teaches you how to ride

CAUSES OF FIRE
FAULTY ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT/WIRING OVERLOADED ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS CARELESS HANDLING/ DISPOSAL OF SMOLDERING MATERIALS INCORRECT USE OF HEATING DEVICES OVERHEATING OF EQUIPMENT

VIOLATION OF STOCKING/ STORAGE RULES/POOR HOUSE KEEPING


WELDING & CUTTING OPERATIONS

SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION(DIRECT HEAT)

DONT WORK ON ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT IF YOU ARE NOT QUALIFIED

FRAYED CABLES

Dont overload sockets use one plug in each socket

Piggy-backed multi-plug strips

Always position heaters so the back is against a wall and facing the room. Dont place heaters near curtains or Furnishings. Switch heaters off if youre not in the room, and also when you go to bed

Careless smoking can cause fire !

CAUSES OF FIRE
(STATISTICS)

OTHER CAUSES 11%

CARELESS SMOKING 18%

ELECTRIC 71%

CLASSIFICATION OF FIRES
TYPE A (SOLIDS) - Paper, wood, fabric etc TYPE B (LIQUIDS) - Petrol, spirits, wax, oil, paint etc TYPE C (GASES) - LPG, CNG, hydrogen, acetylene etc

GAS

TYPE D (METALS) - Magnesium, sodium, Aluminium etc

CHEMISTRY OF FIRE

FUEL

EXTINGUISHING A FIRE
FIRE IS EXTINGUISHED BY REMOVAL OF ANY ONE OF THE 3 ELEMENTS

Starvation

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS--- HOW TO USE THEM EVEN THOUGH EXTINGUISHERS COME IN A NUMBER OF SHAPES AND SIZES, THEY ALL OPERATE IN A SIMILAR MANNER. WHEN USING AN FE REMEMBER THE WORD PASS : P A S S -- PULL, AIM, SQUEEZE, AND SWEEP

Dos & Donts in a fire


Dos
KEEP COOL WALK CRAWL COVER NOSE & MOUTH WITH WET HANKY

Donts
PANIC
RUN

WASTE ENERGY
INHALE SMOKE & FUMES TAKE SHELTER TOILETS IN

IF TRAPPED SHOUT FOR HELP

WORK IN UNISON - TEAM WORK WILL SAVE LIVES

REMEMBER
FIRE RESPECTS NOTHING

- IT DESTROYS
- IT CLOSES FACTORIES - IT CREATES JOB LOSSES

- IT KILLS

MAKE UP YOUR MIND DO YOU WANT TO COMBAT IT YOURSELF OR LEAVE IT TO OTHERS

Always Keep your back towards exit to escape if fire increases

If fighting in the open, do not face the wind to avoid heat & agent hitting your body If fire major, close the door, windows & raise alarm. This is done for two reasons. Firstly, the heat, smoke & fire is contained inside and does not spread giving you more time to react. Secondly, there are chances that the fire is smothered out due to depleting level of oxygen inside the room.

Flames above your head Cant breathe properly or cannot bear the heat Cant see clearly what is burning Dont have adequate or appropriate equipment Unable to operate the extinguisher with your back towards an exit Instincts tell you not to get involved Forgot how to use an extinguisher!!! Never enter a smoke-filled room except for saving life. It is easy to get lost in smoke & smoke also causes major damages (especially burns inside the lungs and asphyxia)

Safety Rules While Using LPG Gas Cylinders


1Always remember to switch off the Pressure Regulator
when the stove is not in use, especially at night. Don't tamper with your cylinder or allied equipment.

Make sure all parts of the installation are in good condition. If you find anything wrong with any part, contact your distributor and ask for a mechanic immediately
Keep children away from the Stove (Chulha) while you're cooking. Use dry pot holders. Never leave the hotplate on and unattended. The burners could extinguish by overflow of cooking material or even draught of air) allowing gas to leak.

AVOID ACCIDENTS- SAVE LIFE


Prevention is better than Cure