The Paris Review6 min read
Where Is Poetry Now?
This year, The Paris Review will engage in an exciting mission to expand its reaches through the world of poetry. For each of our next four issues, our editor, Emily Nemens, will work in tandem with four quite different, highly esteemed poets to find
The Paris Review6 min read
Pop Songs in English, Written by Native Speakers of Swedish
ABBA. If you were in the land of the living in ’93, you’ll remember a song called “All That She Wants,” by the Swedish band Ace of Base. I don’t know anybody who resisted that song. I, who usually hate songs like that (porny-poppy, slick, computer-ge
The Paris Review3 min read
Redux: Help Me Find My Spaceman Lover
Every week, the editors of The Paris Review lift the paywall on a selection of interviews, stories, poems, and more from the magazine’s archive. You can have these unlocked pieces delivered straight to your inbox every Sunday by signing up for the Re
The Paris Review8 min read
Mothers As Makers Of Death
Stages in pregnancy as illustrated in the nineteenth-century medical text Nouvelles démonstrations d’accouchemens. I wrote the first draft of my novel Heartbreaker in a ten-day mania in August 2015 with a fist-size bandage over my left ear; beneath i
The Paris Review10 min read
Satirizing Identity Politics: An Interview with Lexi Freiman
Lexi Freiman. I first encountered Lexi Freiman’s work in a workshop at Columbia University. She had written a short story about a woman in a shifting, phantasmagoric relationship with a man whom the narration treated at some times as a nemesis and at
The Paris Review9 min readSociety
The Historical Future of Trans Literature
Whatever happens against custom we say is against Nature, yet there is nothing whatsoever which is not in harmony with her. May Nature’s universal reason chase away that deluded ecstatic amazement which novelty brings to us. —Michel de Montaigne If y
The Paris Review5 min read
Holy Disobedience: On Jean Genet’s ‘The Thief’s Journal’
In the first stirring lines of The Thief’s Journal, Jean Genet bares his youthful aspirations, his doctrine as a poet, and his tenets as a man. He offers a single sentence—“Convicts’ garb is striped pink and white”—then embarks on a paragraph of Prou
The Paris Review8 min read
Staff Picks: Film Forum, Fallout Shelters, and Fermentation
If you recently found yourself wandering West Houston and Sixth, did you notice the soft sounds of film reels spinning and popcorn popping? If you didn’t, then you weren’t listening hard enough, because Film Forum is reopened for business after its r
The Paris Review5 min read
Translation, In Sickness And In Health
Roman Casas, Decadent Woman, 1899. Translation is a curious craft. You must capture the voice of an author writing in one language and bear it into another, yet leave faint trace that the transfer ever took place. (The translator extraordinaire Charl
The Paris Review8 min read
The Sad Boys of Sadcore
Peter Milton Walsh performing with his band the Apartments. “I liked my shirt a few hours ago, but now I feel bad about it,” Mark Eitzel said from the tiny stage at (Le) Poisson Rouge. He was smiling but not joking. He’d been forgetting lyrics and fa
The Paris Review8 min read
Feminize Your Canon: Violette Leduc
Our monthly column Feminize Your Canon explores the lives of underrated and underread female authors. Violette Leduc. In the summer of 1956, Violette Leduc, the autofiction pioneer and protegée of Simone de Beauvoir, began inpatient psychiatric treat
The Paris Review2 min read
Leonor Fini: Theatre of Desire
I always imagined that I would have a life very different than the one imagined for me, but I understood from a very early age that I would have to revolt in order to make that life. —Leonor Fini Admirers of the Argentine Italian artist Leonor Fini h
The Paris Review3 min read
Notes Nearing Ninety: Learning to Write Less
Donald Hall, who died in June this year at the age of eighty-nine, was a prolific poet, essayist, and editor whose work has had an enormous impact on American letters. He was The Paris Review’s first poetry editor, and he served as the U.S. poet laur
The Paris Review7 min readSociety
Joan Morgan, Hip-Hop Feminism, and The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill
Lauryn Hill. One recent midsummer afternoon, I trekked from Central Brooklyn to the South Bronx to meet the pioneering hip-hop journalist and feminist writer Joan Morgan, author of the new book She Begat This: 20 Years of The Miseducation of Lauryn H
The Paris Review2 min read
Redux: Doing Battle with Your Successors
Every week, the editors of The Paris Review lift the paywall on a selection of interviews, stories, poems, and more from the magazine’s archive. You can have these unlocked pieces delivered straight to your inbox every Sunday by signing up for the Re
The Paris Review6 min read
Seven Books I’ll Never Read
There comes a point in every reader’s life when they must make peace with all the books they’ll never read. This is true even for the most voracious reader in the world. They say Alexander Pope was the last person to have read every book ever written
The Paris Review7 min read
Mermaids and Transgressive Sex: An Interview with Alexia Arthurs
How to Love a Jamaican, Alexia Arthurs’s first book, is a short-story collection that delves into the lives of people who have Jamaica in common. Whether it’s the place they currently live, the place they left, or the place their parents are from, Ja
The Paris Review11 min read
Notes On The Death Of Oxana Shachko
From Oxana Shachko’s Instagram (@oksanashachko). Oxana Shachko told me she preferred that spelling, with the x, in 2016, as I was finalizing an essay that would describe, among other things, her life. In news articles about her, which have multiplied
The Paris Review11 min read
The Treasures That Prevail: On the Prose of Adrienne Rich
Adrienne Rich. Toward the end of “Diving into the Wreck,” one of her most renowned poems, Adrienne Rich explains the goals of her underwater journey: I came to explore the wreck. The words are purposes. The words are maps. I came to see the damage th
The Paris Review7 min read
Staff Picks: Jewel Thieves and Drunken Companions
The comedy of the New York girl abroad, exemplified in Elaine Dundy’s The Dud Avocado, is high among my favorite genres, followed closely by the tragedy of the New York girl abroad—Daisy Miller is one among many Jamesian examples. Eve Babitz’s Black
The Paris Review8 min readFood & Wine
Cooking with Buchi Emecheta
In Valerie Stivers’s Eat Your Words series, she cooks up recipes drawn from the works of various writers. The Nigerian expatriate writer Buchi Emecheta (1944–2017) in her own words was a “sort of” successful novelist in the London of the 1970s and 1
The Paris Review10 min read
A Conversation Between Nell Painter and Lynne Tillman
Left: photo by John Emerson; Right: photo by Craig Mod Lynne Tillman and Nell Painter can’t remember how they first met. Tillman believes they were introduced at a history conference, while Painter is sure that their first encounter was here, at the
The Paris Review2 min read
Paradise for Bookworms
The first and only edition of an extensive monograph on the silkworm by Emilio Cornalia. Bugs are not great from the booklover’s point of view. They eat paper, devouring precious words in the process. They nestle audaciously inside expensive bindings
The Paris Review7 min read
The Spectacle of Women’s Wrestling
Vintage newspaper photograph of women wrestlers. “The virtue of wrestling is to be a spectacle of excess,” Roland Barthes begins—but we are wary of excess in women, wary of too much flesh, too much blood, too much lust or power. Too much knowledge: E
The Paris Review5 min read
Poetry Rx: Listen I Love You Joy Is Coming
In our column Poetry Rx, readers write in with a specific emotion, and our resident poets—Sarah Kay, Kaveh Akbar, and Claire Schwartz—take turns prescribing the perfect poems to match. This week, Sarah Kay is on the line. ©Ellis Rosen Dear Poets, I’m
The Paris Review8 min readPolitics
The Vanishing of Reality
Do I want to interfere with the reality tape? And if so, why? Because, he thought, if I control that, I control reality. —Philip K. Dick, “The Electric Ant” Surreal and chaos have become two of those words invoked hourly by journalists trying to desc
The Paris Review2 min read
Images from Louisiana’s Black Trail-Riding Clubs
Black trail-riding clubs have their roots in Creole culture, formed in South Louisiana in the eighteenth century. Today trail rides are an opportunity for generations of people to gather, celebrate, and ride horseback. The riders form a distinctive y
The Paris Review9 min read
Who Is Nanette?
Still from Nanette. When I look at Hannah Gadsby, I see myself. The stand-up comedian from Tasmania holds her body like a tall woman is wont to do: chest puffed out, shoulders turned inward, weathered from years of hunching. I know this because I am
The Paris Review2 min read
Redux: On Trial
Every week, the editors of The Paris Review lift the paywall on a selection of interviews, stories, poems, and more from the magazine’s archive. You can have these unlocked pieces delivered straight to your inbox every Sunday by signing up for the Re
The Paris Review10 min read
Ugliness Is Underrated: In Defense of Ugly Paintings
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Czardas dancers, 1908. Inside an old brick building in Somerville’s Davis Square, below the gilded stage and the red velvet seats, there is an unusual museum. Hidden in the basement of the 1914 Art Deco building is a collection
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